Tag: Girl Scouts of America

Girl Scouts of the USA – Troop 303 Hastings Middle School!

Happy Friday, beloved Cartoon Library blog followers! You may have noticed that our blog has a new look — we’d love to get your feedback on it in the comments section.

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Our gift to you this weekend is even more eternally-inspiration photos of our most recent visit from the Girl Scouts of the USA! Troop 303 of the Girl Scouts of Ohio’s Heartland Council came by from Hastings Middle School to earn their Cadette Comic Artist Badge by learning all about women in comics, methods of self-publishing, re-purposing materials, and storytelling techniques. As usual, the afternoon culminated in each Junior Girl Scout producing an amazing 8 page comic out of one sheet of paper. To learn more about our involvement with the Girl Scouts of America in the Cartoon Library, visit our past posts here and here.

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The Girls poured over dozens of mini-comics, Stephenny Godfrey’s epic fold-out comic Panorama being an especially big hit with this group. Click to enlarge the images below!

Reeling with ideas, they set to work on their comics, some girls even finishing two or three during our session!

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Congratulations to the awesome cartoonists of Troop 303 on their first self published works!

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For information about starting a small-press collection at your library, or bringing a Girl Scout troop into our library, please contact Caitlin McGurk at mcgurk.17@osu.edu

Making Comics with Girl Scouts of the USA Troop 2687 (Photoset)

On Thursday, February 7th, Girl Scouts of the USA Troop 2687 visited the Cartoon Library to learn all about DIY book binding, women in comics, and how to make their own 8-page comic out of one sheet of paper. We’re always thrilled to work with the Girls, and Troop 2687 cranked out the most mini-comics of any crew we’ve hosted yet!

To get a full run down on what kind of activities we do with the Girl Scouts for them to earn their Drawing Badge or Comic Artist Badge, hop over to our post from this Fall on our time with Troop 1320.

After a whirlwind introduction to the great women in comics history, the group went over a wide variety of exciting and eccentric ways to print and bind comics, much to their astonished delight. Fully inspired and raring to go, they then sat down to put it all out on paper.

Giggles rang throughout the Cartoon Library as we contemplated the various hilarious roles for a hamster to play as the main character in our individual comics, which served as a muse for many of them. At the end of our hour-and-a-half session, the Girls slapped their comic onto the copy machine, emerging as official self-published cartoonists with copies of their debut work ready for the world!

Congratulations to the great cartoonists of Troop 2687! Girls rule forever.

Girl Scouts of the USA in the Cartoon Library (Photoset)

Junior Girl Scouts of the USA (4th and 5th graders) Gables Elementary Troop 1320 visited the Cartoon Library yesterday afternoon to learn about comics, self-publishing, and to earn their Drawing Badge! We love the Girl Scouts, and some of you may remember our work with Troop 1214 for their Cadette Comic Artist Badge this summer.

Girl Scout troop 1320 Gables Elementary

These fabulous girls arrived at the Cartoon Library yesterday, equipped with pencils, paper, scissors and more ideas than they could get down on the page during our one-hour session. We went over an abridged history of women in comics, and then took a look at some great works by female cartoonists including Megan Kelso, Tarpe Mills, Raina Telgemeier, Vera Brosgol, Colleen Coover, Sara Varon and many more.

The girls were also given a selection of items to study from The Dylan Williams Collection; all hand-made, uniquely bound, self-published and widely varying formats of mini-comics. We figured out how each one was made, and explored the beauty of re-purposing materials for your artwork (floss! potato stamps! cereal boxes! cigarette cartons! and more), and took some time to read our favorites.

They went wild over the potential that self-publishing holds, making this session another of many that drove home the importance of collecting and archiving self-published and small press works. These items are often the most inspirational–especially to youths–by their ability to capture the possibility, accessibility, and fun in DIY projects. Kids are empowered by the freedom that self-publishing offers, are unintimidated by the comics and cartoon format, and always attracted to the craftiness of hand-binding. Here at the Cartoon Library, we are finding boundless benefits from starting this collection of mini-comics, and strongly encourage other libraries to do the same.

Troop 1320 handles, reads, and discusses self-publishing formats and styles

Teeny-tiny magnifying glass inside of Catherine Peach’s “Unicromonicon” offers much delight

Critiquing the finer points of alternative comics

 

Reading a Melissa Mendes story from the “KIDS” anthology

Let the cartooning begin! After studying and sharing these works with each other, the girls then set out to make their own comics. Some stuck to the one-sheet-workshop format and others pushed their pieces to a whole new level, folding folds where folds have never been folded before! Some made multiple finished booklets, others took time to detail 9 panels onto each 2 3/4 x 4 1/4 page.

The girls get to work, amid their influences

Cartooning is serious business to Troop 1320

Troop 1320 trade ideas in the bullpen

Mary Grace shows off her character between giggles: THE STARING MAN!

Thanks for visiting, Troop 1320!

Junior Drawing Badge, earned by 9 future cartoonistas at The Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum

For information about starting a small-press collection at your library, or bringing a Girl Scout troop into our library, please contact Caitlin McGurk at mcgurk.17@osu.edu

Excitement at the Cartoon Library!

School is out, and June proved to be a fun month for us over here at the Cartoon Library! And as the heat rises in Columbus, we’re as grateful as ever for our temperature and humidity controlled archival sanctuary.

On June 21st, the Girl Scouts of America paid a visit to the Cartoon Library to earn their fabulously-designed Cadette Comic Artist Badge! We were thrilled to hear that a badge like this now exists for the Girl Scouts, and happy to help Troop #1214 gain theirs. During their time here, they received a history of ground-breaking female cartoonists, looking at originals from Edwina Dumm, Trina Robbins, Hilda Terry, Lynda Barry and many more, as well as seeing the Miss Fury tearsheets by Tarpe Mills! They were also given an introduction to the world of self-publishing, and a mini-comics making workshop. Pictured below is girl scout Beth Bolan with a Wonder Woman original!

Girl Scout Beth Bolon with original art by Trina Robbins for “The Legend of Wonder Woman”. From the Mark J. Cohen and Rose Marie McDaniel Collection, The Ohio State University Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum

During the week of June 18-21st, we had the pleasure of hosting researcher and cartoonist, JB Winter from Columbia, Missouri who came here to use the manuscripts of our founding collection- Milton Caniff! Winter is studying the character Miss Mizzou, who Caniff introduced into his Steve Canyon strips in 1952. Mizzou’s namesake comes from the nickname of the University of Missouri in Columbia. Winter spent his time at the Cartoon Library using Caniff’s research files and personal correspondence folders to explore Caniff’s relationship with Columbia, Missouri, in order to write an article encompassing the history of the Miss. Mizzou character- especially timely as this year marks her 60th anniversary. Miss Mizzou’s character also had several promotional tie-ins with the city, some which were celebrated and some controversial, so we’re certain that JB’s article will be a fascinating read.

Below, Caniff’s Miss Mizzou herself:

Milton Caniff’s “Miss Mizzou”. From The Toni Mendez Collection, The Ohio State University Billy Ireland Cartoon Library and Museum

On June 26th, we brought Portland-based cartoonist and illustrator Aidan Koch in to give a talk at the Wexner Center! You can read more about the event here. Aidan was the cartoonist in residency for the month of June at the downtown art space Skylab Gallery, and we’re thrilled to have had our first cross-community collaboration like this. She is also the youngest cartoonist to join us on stage at the Wexner, and the very first self-publisher. As we approach our move into Sullivant Hall in the Fall of 2013, we anticipate much more programming like this as we’ll finally have the space and accessibility to do so. Thanks again to all those who came out to see Aidan last week!

We’ll be posting a video of Aidan’s event this week, but for now you can listen to an audio recording of it here. Enjoy!