Election Day gallery: Women’s Suffrage cartoons from “Ladies First”

It’s Election Day in the United States, and 2020 is the centennial of the ratification of the 19th Amendment, prohibiting the government from denying the right to vote to citizens on the basis of sex. In celebration of our current exhibit, “Ladies First: A Century of Women’s Innovations in Comics and Cartoon Art”, we are highlighting some of the powerful work by suffragist cartoonists who were fighting for the issues they believed in; from child labor laws and prohibition, to the vote itself. It is important to note, however, that women of color were often blocked from casting their vote for many decades after the 19th Amendment passed. Today when we go to the polls, we are grateful to all who came before us to fight for the rights of all people to vote.

To see more of this work, make an reservation today to visit the Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum galleries.

Blanche Ames (1878 – 1969)

Blanche Ames, “Double the power of the home — two good votes are better than one” October 23, 1915. Woman’s Journal and Suffrage News

Katherine Milhous (1894–1977)

Katherine Milhous, “A Moving Picture” March 11, 1916 Woman’s Journal and Suffrage News

Lou Rogers (1879–1952)

Lou Rogers, “Conquering and Still to Conquer” November 9, 1912. Womans Journal and Suffrage News

Lou Rogers, “The Village Soak — A Voter”  February 19, 1916. Woman’s Journal and Suffrage News

Fredrikke S. Palmer (1860-1947)

Fredrikke S. Palmer, “Child Labor: What are you going to do about it?” January 22, 1916. Woman’s Journal and Suffrage News

Fredrikke S. Palmer, “Waiting for the Returns”, October 30, 1915. Woman’s Journal and Suffrage News

Marika Bryn (unknown)

Marika Bryn, “The Trumpeter Awakening New York” May 6, 1911. Woman’s Journal and Suffrage News

Mayme B. Harwood (unknown)

Mayme B. Harwood, “His Christmas Pie” December 19, 1914, Woman’s Journal and Suffrage News

Laura Foster (1871 – 1920)

Laura Foster, “Progress” March 17, 1917, Puck

Nina Allender (1873–1957)

Nina Allendar, “Exploding Opposition” July 10, 1915. The Suffragist

Edwina Dumm (1893-1990)

Edwina Dumm, “Up to him now”, February 2, 1917. Columbus Monitor

BICLM Zoom Background Series: Frank King’s Gasoline Alley

Few cartoonists can capture the feel of changing seasons quite like Frank King, creator of Gasoline Alley. Known for his innovative panel design, brilliant color palate and the “real-time” aging of his characters, King’s lovingly rendered full-page comics graced the Sunday newspaper from from 1918-1959.  As the leaves change here in Ohio and many of us continue to work from home or attend classes online, BICLM is bringing you a new set of autumnal Zoom backgrounds featuring Walt and Skeezix.

You can click to enlarge and save the images below, or download the files directly here.
Need help changing your Virtual Background in Zoom? Video instructions here.

Gasoline Alley, November 16, 1924. From our San Francisco Academy of Comic Art Collection. See full image here.

Gasoline Alley, October 21, 1923. From our San Francisco Academy of Comic Art Collection. See full image here.

Gasoline Alley, October 30, 1921. From our San Francisco Academy of Comic Art Collection. See full image here.

Gasoline Alley, October 21, 1923. From our San Francisco Academy of Comic Art Collection. See full image here.

Gasoline Alley, October 21, 1923. From our San Francisco Academy of Comic Art Collection. See full image here.

Gasoline Alley, October 28, 1923. From our San Francisco Academy of Comic Art Collection. See full image here.

Gasoline Alley, October 21, 1923. From our San Francisco Academy of Comic Art Collection. See full image here.

Gasoline Alley, October 28, 1923. From our San Francisco Academy of Comic Art Collection. See full image here.

Gasoline Alley, October 29, 1922. From our San Francisco Academy of Comic Art Collection. See full image here.

Gasoline Alley, October 30, 1921. From our San Francisco Academy of Comic Art Collection. See full image here.

Gasoline Alley, October 21, 1923. From our San Francisco Academy of Comic Art Collection. See full image here.

Check out our Little Nemo in Slumberland and Krazy Kat backgrounds, too!

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