From Woody's Couch

Our Playbook on OSU History

Category: Archival resources (page 1 of 14)

Scrapbook provides insights to early student life

Esther McGinnis Scrapbook, 1915

Today, college scrapbooks simply contain photos of one participating in various university events, friends hanging around on the weekends, and maybe a graduation cap tassel or diploma at the very end. However, the almost 200 page scrapbook that Esther McGinnis made to commemorate her time at the Ohio State University may not contain any photos of herself, but tells us much more.

Makio 1915

McGinnis started at Ohio State in the fall of 1911 as a Home Economics major and was actively involved throughout the Ohio State community during her undergraduate career. The journey through her scrapbook begins with the various organizations that she participated in during her four years. The Young Women’s Christian Association (Y.W.C.A.) appears to have been a major organization during McGinnis’ collegiate years.

YWCA Membership Card

Her membership card stating her affiliation and fee of one dollar to join is one of the first items glued into the book with a news article about her appointment as treasurer. She also belonged to the Philomathean Literary Society, one of the oldest existing literary societies among universities. Her scrapbook contains her invitation to join and several invitations to attend events held by the group. Additionally, as a member of the Women’s Glee Club she cut out Lantern news articles about her acceptance and their concerts that followed.

Athletic Tags, c. 1911

During McGinnis’ time at Ohio State she also participated in quite a few organizations pertaining to her major, home economics. She was a member of the Home Economics Club, inducted into Phi Upsilon Lambda – a national home economics honorary, andworked as a student assistant in the Home Economics department.

Dance card, 1912

While this scrapbook is significantly dated, it is similar to today’s scrapbooks by what it contains next. The first half of the book reads like a yearbook mainly because it involves her inclusion in school activities, while the second half of the book is more about the various events she participated in outside of her organizations. One such activity is a Co-Ed prom she attended with Dorothy Griggs in 1913 at The Armory. Inside the scrapbook McGinnis attached a dance card, which lists the dances followed by the name of whomever she danced with. In addition, there are tags that were used for various athletic events around campus with captions underneath them such as, “Girls Basket Ball Tournament.”

Valentine c. 1911

Continuing to flip through the pages will allow one to see all the parties, luncheons, plays, and concerts that McGinnis attended by means of invitations, playbills, tickets, and programs glued inside. One page we found to be interesting within the scrapbook was a cut-out heart valentine that reads “’E’ is for Esther, Please don’t molest her.” While we may not know the context behind it, this clever rhyme allows us to think about a different time in history and what the valentine could have meant to her at the time. Whether it is an inside joke among friends or a gift she received, we may never know but this is what makes the scrapbook intriguing and an asset to our collection at the archives.

The rest of McGinnis’ scrapbook is filled of news clippings about what was going on around campus. While some of these articles acknowledged her induction into an organization or her tryouts for the Glee Club, most of them were just current events or updates on individuals’ lives. Many were about new faculty and staff, engagement and event announcements, event recaps, and the occasional news clipping about Dr. Thompson; such as the Christmas greeting that he wrote in 1914.

Alumni Magazine, 1951

This scrapbook contains the memories and moments that Esther McGinnis wanted to remember beyond her days at Ohio State. In doing so, Esther provided the archives with an inside story of what the life of an Ohio State student was like at the beginning of the 20th century. It highlights the events that took place, what students valued and found to be of importance, and gives us the chance to learn about Ohio State from a new, fascinating perspective.

As for Esther McGinnis, she continued on to receive her master’s in nutrition at Columbia University and her Ph.D in child development at University of Minnesota, but eventually returned to the Ohio State University. In 1951, an honorary Doctor of Laws degree was granted upon her at the Ohio State University and the following year she became a professor in the Home Economics department at Ohio State. She was the member of several honorary societies within her discipline and the author of many books as well. Her scrapbook will remain in the University’s collection to allow our patrons to enjoy it as much as we have!

A bounty of Buckeye-themed goodies, thanks to Trademark and Licensing

It’s likely many of you have never have heard of one of OSU’s most influential offices, but boy, have you sure seen its imprint.

Trademark and Licensing has been around for more than 30 years, “protecting the University’s name and identifying marks,” according to its web site.  It all started in 1982, with a proposal of a program to ensure OSU received a royalty from each sale of OSU-themed merchandise. The program also would regulate which products were allowed to use Ohio State’s trademark, to make sure the University’s image remained unsullied. (By the way, the Libraries receives a percentage of each royalty, so we are particularly grateful for this program.)

Now, vendors who want to use OSU’s  name or logo on their merchandise must undergo a rigorous application process with the Trademark and Licensing Office to get approval.  While the office is strict about its standards, it does approve a wide variety of items to be sold.  We thought we’d take you down memory lane to show what kind of items once adorned the shelves of various retail outlets around town back in the ’80s. The material in these photos is from a collection transferred to the Archives in 1989 by the office.

Our models in the photos were Brandon Abbott, Britain Wetzel and Jimmy Zimmerman. Brandon, a Math major who was a summer-only Archives student assistant, returned to classes last week. Britain and Jimmy graduated last spring, and this fall, Jimmy is starting his second year of courses at OSU’s School of Dentistry. Meanwhile, Britain is beginning her first year of coursework at Kent State University’s College of Podiatric Medicine. Thanks and good luck to all three!

So let’s get to the photos!

 

For Archives, it’s pretty fabulous to be 50

anniversary_emblem_fullsizeEveryone always complains about getting old, but here at the Archives, we found that turning 50, at least, can be one heck of a good time.

We had more than 300 people help us celebrate this important milestone during our Anniversary Open House event on May 14. Our guests were treated to a wide array of artifacts, a viewing of historical campus film footage, and fine food and drink.

If you attended the event, you may have noticed guests who took the opportunity to sit on OSU Football Coach Woody Hayes’ Couch (as seen in the upper-right-hand corner of this blog) and share their favorite memories of attending or working at OSU. Check it out!


To see how really spectacular the event was, please see the Archives’ Flickr Gallery.

You can also revisit the 50 artifacts that were on display during the event in a new interactive story map, designed by Josh Sadvari of the Research Commons.

University Archives' 50th Anniversary Story Map

University Archives’ 50th Anniversary Story Map

We truly appreciate all of our supporters who attended our Anniversary event.  If you were not able to make it, we hope this post has given you an opportunity to see what was missed.  And, if you are interested in donating to the Archives, you can do so through our Paul E. and Sandy Watkins Endowment for University Archives.

See why your support is so important to our mission in a message written by University Archivist Tamar Chute.

And finally, if you just want to take a look at cool old photos of OSU, check out our Flickr page!

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