Month: January 2013

New Exhibit: A.B. Walker’s World

ABWalkerposter_3

Alanson Burton Walker was a very successful magazine cartoonist working at the beginning of 20th century.  His work was much in demand and he drew for all the important magazines of the time–Life, Harper’s, Atlantic Monthly, Saturday Evening Post, Judge and Collier’s–where he created gentle, wry cartoons on issues of the day.

Walker was born in Binghampton, New York on November 19, 1878, attended Buffalo Central High School, and later Rochester University from which he graduated in 1897. He spent the next four years taking classes at the Art Students League in New York, studying under Frank Vincent DuMond.  His brother William H. Walker, also a cartoonist, became the chief editorial cartoonist for Life at the end of the 1890s.  Both brothers lived and worked in Flushing, New York.  A. B. Walker died of a heart attack while shoveling snow on January 22, 1947.

Most of the work on display dates from 1909-1913 and was created by Walker while he was in his early thirties.  All were drawn for Harper’s Magazine and focus on topics of the time:  changes in transportation (automobiles and aeronautics); observations on women and women’s suffrage; and love and marriage.  Walker’s work captures the preoccupations of early 20th century life with wit and charm.  His cartoons, with their fluid lines and gentle humor, remain as pleasing to us today as they were to the audience he created them for a century ago.

These cartoons form part of the International Museum of Cartoon Art Collection and were donated by A. B. Walker’s son and his wife, Keith and Mary Lou Walker.

Curated by Lucy Shelton Caswell, Professor Emerita, The Ohio State University Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum and Ann Lennon, Project Registrar, International Museum of Cartoon Art Collection.

This is our second-to-last show in our current space, and will be on view until April 26th.
We hope you will come by and check it out!

Found in the Collection: “Punk” magazine No. 6

Punk and comics, two of America’s greatest subcultures, together at last in 1976 for Issue no. 6 of John Holmstrom and Legs McNeil’s revolutionary Punk magazine.

Cover of Punk magazine issue no. 6 with art by John Holmstrom, from The San Francisco Academy of Comic Art Collection, The Ohio State University Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum (click to enlarge)

Cover of Punk magazine issue no. 6 with art by John Holmstrom, from The San Francisco Academy of Comic Art Collection, The Ohio State University Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum (click to enlarge)

We won’t be able to include the entire juicy story here–starring some of the Lower East Side’s finest from the 1970s scene including Debbie Harry, Richard Hell, David Byrne, David Jo Hansen, and so many more–but below you can enjoy a few of our favorite pages from this fine photo comic.

The scene is set with Special Agent Victor Martino, as played by Lenny Kaye of the Patti Smith group.

Page 1 of Punk magazine Issue No. 6, From the San Francisco Academy of Comic Art Collection, The Ohio State University Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum (click to enlarge)

Page 1 of Punk magazine Issue No. 6, from The San Francisco Academy of Comic Art Collection, The Ohio State University Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum (click to enlarge)

The star of the show, as indicated on the cover, is the great Richard Hell-pioneer of the punk look himself-as Nick Detroit, a former government agent who had been framed by the press for killing 966 people in the line of duty and forced into retirement. Detroit is called back into action by Chief (and guitarist) Bob Quine to solve some mysterious murders around town.

Punk Magazine issue No. 6, from The San Francisco Academy of Comic Art Collection, The Ohio State University Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum (click to enlarge)

Page 4 of Punk magazine issue No. 6, from The San Francisco Academy of Comic Art Collection, The Ohio State University Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum (click to enlarge)

Page 5 of Punk magazine Issue No.6, from The San Francisco Academy of Comic Art, The Ohio State University Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum (click to enlarge)

Page 7 of Punk magazine Issue No.6, from The San Francisco Academy of Comic Art, The Ohio State University Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum (click to enlarge)

The New York Doll’s David Jo Hansen as the evil Tony, mob king and prime suspect.

Page 6 of Punk magazine Issue No. 6, from The San Francisco Academy of Comic Art Collection, The Ohio State University Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum (click to enlarge)

Page 8 of Punk magazine Issue No. 6, from The San Francisco Academy of Comic Art Collection, The Ohio State University Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum (click to enlarge)

As the plot unfolds, we’re introduced to a star-studded feminist gang who reveal themselves as the real perpetrators in their plot for total world domination, which must begin with the extermination of Nick Detroit, “as he is the living living symbol of masculinity”. High-fashion chaos ensues.

Punk magazine issue No. 6, from The San Francisco Academy of Comic Art Collection, The Ohio State University Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum (click to enlarge)

Page 18 of Punk magazine issue No. 6, from The San Francisco Academy of Comic Art Collection, The Ohio State University Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum (click to enlarge)

…as for the rest of the story, you’ll have to dig through your old zines or visit us at the Cartoon Library to read on.

Found in the Collection: Bill Crawford illustrations

Bill Crawford is yet another cartoonist talent who spent his undergraduate years here at The Ohio State University, where he edited the cartoon magazine Sun Dial.

Original by Bill Crawford, The Bill Crawford Collection, The Ohio State University Billy Ireland Cartoon Library and Museum (click to enlarge)

Original by Bill Crawford, The Bill Crawford Collection, The Ohio State University Billy Ireland Cartoon Library and Museum (click to enlarge)

He worked for years as a sports cartoonist for the Washington Daily News and the Washington Post, and was the chief editorial cartoonist for the Newspaper Enterprise Association.

Bill Crawford original. From the Bill Crawford Collection, The Ohio State University Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum (click to enlarge)

Bill Crawford original. From the Bill Crawford Collection, The Ohio State University Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum (click to enlarge)

Some of his most charming and less seen work, however, were illustrations for various books throughout his career- including Milton Berle’s Out of My Trunk and The Zebra Derby by Max Shulman, among over 20 other publications. We absolutely love his free flowing yet stylized line, and the chain-gang image above is particularly marvelous as the prisoners look almost 3-D as they emerge from the featureless background.

Original art by Bill Crawford. From the Bill Crawford Collection, The Ohio State University Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum (click to enlarge)

Original art by Bill Crawford. From the Bill Crawford Collection, The Ohio State University Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum (click to enlarge)

In 1973, Crawford received the Silver T-Square Award from the National Cartoonist Society, and had been awarded Best Editorial Cartoonist by them 4 times prior to that. He was also an accomplished photographer and sculptor, and designed and sculpted the NCS “No. 1 Award” himself.

Original art by Bill Crawford. From the Bill Crawford Collection, The Ohio State University Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum (click to enlarge)

Original art by Bill Crawford. From the Bill Crawford Collection, The Ohio State University Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum (click to enlarge)

Crawford retired from cartooning in the 1970s, and passed away in Washington D.C. in 1982. In 1993, the Cartoon Library held a retrospective exhibition of Crawford’s work, samples from which can be seen here.

Found in the Collection: Richard Guindon

We absolutely adore the clever, biting, sentimental and even existential sense of humor of the great absurdist cartoonist, Richard Guindon.

Original art by Richard Guindon. From the Richard Guindon Collection, The Ohio State University Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum (click to enlarge).

Original art by Richard Guindon. From the Richard Guindon Collection, The Ohio State University Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum (click to enlarge).

GuindonNiceFish

Original art by Richard Guindon. From the Richard Guindon Collection, The Ohio State University Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum (click to enlarge).

Guindon’s work appeared in the The Detroit Free Press for years, as well as Paul Krassner’s The Realist and the Minneapolis Tribune, and is best known for his self-titled gag feature Guindon.

GuindonLetsDance

Original art by Richard Guindon. From the Richard Guindon Collection, The Ohio State University Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum (click to enlarge).

GuindonOldPeople

Original art by Richard Guindon. From the Richard Guindon Collection, The Ohio State University Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum (click to enlarge).

Residing in Michigan, Guindon retired from cartooning in 2005 but his work can still be found in his website here, and those featured today are among hundreds of others within the Cartoon Library collection.

Found in the Collection: Frederick Burr Opper: A Dangerous American Institution

Frederick Burr Opper take on gun control, from all the way back in 1881.

Frederick Burr Opper's "A Dangerous American Institution-The Free and Untrammeled Revolver:, from December 14th, 1881. The Ohio State University Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum (click to enlarge)

Frederick Burr Opper’s “A Dangerous American Institution-The Free and Untrammeled Revolver:, from December 14th, 1881. The Ohio State University Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum (click to enlarge)

Eerily timeless, isn’t it?

Found in the Collection: W. O. Wilson’s “Madge The Magicians Daughter”

As mentioned in yesterday’s fantastic interview on The Comics Reporter website with our head Curator Jenny Robb, one of the greatly unappreciated and enigmatic virtuosos of the newspaper comics pages was W. O. Wilson.

W.O. Wilson's "Madge The Magician's Daughter" Richard D. Olson Collection, The Ohio State University Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum (click to enlarge)

W.O. Wilson’s “Madge The Magician’s Daughter” from July 7, 1907. From the  Richard D. Olson Collection, The Ohio State University Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum (click to enlarge)

Unfortunately, next to nothing is know about the artist. The great Alan Holtz of the Stripper’s Guide, however, uncovered some potential details about Wilson’s history through naturalization papers, which tell us he was born in South Africa and settled in various areas of Long Island upon arriving in New York in 1890.

W.O. Wilson's "Madge The Magician's Daughter" from April 28th, 1907. From the Richard D. Olson Collection, The Ohio State University Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum (click to enlarge)

W.O. Wilson’s “Madge The Magician’s Daughter” from April 28th, 1907. From the Richard D. Olson Collection, The Ohio State University Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum (click to enlarge)

Wilson’s forgotten work steps right up to bat with other fantasy artists of the time including Winsor McCay and Lionel Feininger, and his other features–The Wish Twins and Aladdin’s Lamp, The Richleigh Family, and Horace the Hero–all hold elements of wonder as well.

W.O. Wilson's "Madge The Magician's Daughter" from March 24th, 1907. From the Richard D. Olson Collection, The Ohio State University Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum (click to enlarge)

W.O. Wilson’s “Madge The Magician’s Daughter” from March 24th, 1907. From the Richard D. Olson Collection, The Ohio State University Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum (click to enlarge)

An excellent point that Jenny Robb brings up in her article Madge’s Magic, co-authored by Richard D. Olson for the print magazine Hogan’s Alley No. 14 is that unlike his contemporaries, “Wilson made his child protagonist a girl and cast her in stories featuring dinosaurs, dragons, mermaids, pirates and Indians– the adventures usually associated with boys. The only similar example featuring a girl was The Naps of Polly Sleepyhead by Peter Newell, but after nine months Newell dropped the fantasy element and transformed it into a strip about children playing pranks.”

W.O. Wilson's "Madge The Magician's Daughter" from May 12th, 1907. From the Richard D. Olson Collection, The Ohio State University Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum (click to enlarge)

W.O. Wilson’s “Madge The Magician’s Daughter” from May 12th, 1907. From the Richard D. Olson Collection, The Ohio State University Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum (click to enlarge)

In every gorgeously full-colored installment of the feature, Madge fusses with her father’s magic wand and the tricks she has picked up from him in order to create a world in which she can impress her friends- a delightfully faithful portrayal of the imagination and desires of the young. The strip unfortunately ran for only a brief stretch, from Sept. 2, 1906 until August 15, 1907.

W.O. Wilson's "Madge The Magician's Daughter" from May 19th, 1907. From the Richard D. Olson Collection, The Ohio State University Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum (click to enlarge)

W.O. Wilson’s “Madge The Magician’s Daughter” from May 19th, 1907. From the Richard D. Olson Collection, The Ohio State University Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum (click to enlarge)

Happy New Year! Found in the Collection: Walter McDougall

Happy New Year from the Cartoon Library, with help from Walter McDougall’s Old Mr. Profanity from 110 years ago.

Walter McDougall's "Old Mr. Profanity Makes a New Years Resolution". From the San Francisco Academy of Comic Art Collection, The Ohio State University Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum (click to enlarge)

Walter McDougall’s “Old Mr. Profanity Makes a New Year’s Resolution”. From the San Francisco Academy of Comic Art Collection, The Ohio State University Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum (click to enlarge)