OSU student helped everyone know where to sit at home football games

Floyd Martin, 1923

Floyd Martin, 1923

After receiving a scrapbook that belonged to OSU graduate Floyd Marion Martin, we’ve gained more insight on the work that took place during the construction of the Ohio Stadium. Martin graduated in 1923 with a Bachelor’s degree in Electrical Engineering and was involved in Theta Xi and the American Institute of Electrical Engineers, but he also took part in hand-stenciling the seat numbers in the Stadium.

The construction for Ohio Stadium began on August 3, 1921, and by November, the concrete for the first nine rows of seats had been poured by contractors. In all, 75,000 barrels of cement, 22,000 tons of sand, and 45,000 tons of gravel would be used.

Martin's friends paint seat numbers on bleachers, 1922

Martin’s friends paint seat numbers in Ohio Stadium, 1922

Impressive numbers for an impressive edifice, the first of its kind for a college stadium. But fans needed a way to determine where they were going to sit on those concrete rows. By the next September, the football stadium was ready for seat numbers. Enter Martin and his friends, who were employed to put on the finishing touches.

The original seats that Martin and others worked on were three long strips of wood that ran thirty inches in width and seventeen inches in height. One photo, dated September 15, 1922, shows Martin at work with his friends, Pete, Baird, and Shug. They called themselves “The Royal Order of Stalling Stadium Stencilers”.

By October 7, 1922, the Buckeyes played their first game in the new Ohio Stadium against Ohio Wesleyan, winning the game 5-0.

(Below are a few more photographs from Martin’s album.)

1922

1922

1922

1922

 

1922

1922

– Filed by B.T.

Posted in Buildings, People, Sports, Students |

‘Experiment’ for older students lasts 40 years

Program 60 students, 1981

Program 60 students, 1981

In December 1973, then-OSU President Harold Enarson approached the Board of Trustees with an idea: allow Ohio residents aged 65 or older to attend classes at OSU for free. It actually wasn’t his idea – he had seen a similar program the year before at the University of Colorado – but he still considered it an “experiment.”

Enarson told the Lantern after the meeting that he thought the program would get off to “a very slow start,” but hoped that “no one will get discouraged.”

His expectations, to put it mildly, were surpassed. The program is still going strong and has hundreds enrolled each semester.

Then called Program 65, it began with winter quarter 1974 and was coordinated out of the Office of Continuing Education. It gave residents of Ohio 65 and older the ability to attend classes at the university free of charge. The first quarter brought in 67 men and women; by the next fall, 185 students had signed up for approximately 200 courses.

Program 60 students, 1996

Program 60 students, 1996

Ohio State’s Program 65 was such a success that the state legislature passed a bill in 1976 to require all state-supported colleges and universities to permit senior citizens aged 60 and older to attend classes on a non-tuition, space-available basis. OSU changed the name of the program to Program 60, and Enarson joked at the time that he was so proud of the program that on his next birthday – his 60th – he would quit his job, enroll in the program, and “haunt all of these faculty members.”

Filed by L.T.

Posted in Departments, People, Presidents |

Welcome to the dog days of summer

Did you know that the University’s first unofficial mascot was a dog?  His name was Chris, and he was a performing police dog.  Owned and trained by Richard Armel, then a member of the OSU cheerleading squad, he was introduced in the fall season of 1941 to jump through hoops and perform other tricks at football and basketball games and rallies.

OSU's unofficial mascot, Chris, jumps through a cheerleader's paper drum, 1941

OSU’s unofficial mascot, Chris, jumps through a cheerleader’s paper drum, 1941

Chris barks at the opponent's mascot, 1941

Chris is not impressed by the Pitt Panther mascot, 1941

Chris appeared to have made it through only the fall season at OSU, but he certainly made an impression on the other team mascots. (See above.)

Okay, that’s enough of the history portion of our blog for this week.  Now, let’s see the doggies!

A dog is checked by veterinarians at the OSU Clinic, 1984

A dog is checked by veterinarians at the OSU Clinic, 1984

Student sits on bench on the Oval with two dogs

1986

An OSU vet performs a check-up, 1986

An OSU vet performs a check-up, 1986

OSU Vet School dog wash, 1987

OSU Vet School dog wash, 1987

1987, Dog carries a students backpack for her

1987

Student on rollerblades being pulled along by his dog

1990s

Student sitting with a puppy

no date

Posted in Activities, Departments |