Category: NN Exhibits (page 1 of 4)

Celebrating Sparky: Charles M. Schulz and Peanuts

Image with adjacent text alternative.

On view at the Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum
May 21 – October 23
More Information >>

Charles M. Schulz, known as Sparky to his family and friends, single-handedly created 17,897 Peanuts comic strips during a span of almost fifty years. At the time of Schulz’s retirement in 1999, his creation ran in more than 26,000 newspapers, was translated into twenty-one languages in seventy-five countries, and had a daily readership estimated to be 355 million. Peanuts became a worldwide cultural phenomenon in the second half of the twentieth century. Its impact can be seen on everything from space travel and classical music to the Broadway stage, merchandising, and even the English language. 

This exhibition celebrates the centennial of Schulz’s birth and highlights the lasting legacy of his life and work. Schulz’s own words guide visitors to explore the themes of friendship, connectedness, unrequited love, and insecurity that made the strip resonate with so many fans. 

Celebrating Sparky is curated by Lucy Shelton Caswell and mounted in partnership with the Charles M. Schulz Museum and Research Center.

STILL…Racism in America: A Retrospective in Cartoons

On display at the Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum
May 21 – October 23
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Pioneering father/daughter cartoonists Brumsic Brandon Jr. (1927– 2014) and Barbara Brandon-Croft (1958– ) chronicled the nation’s cultural landscape in their comic strips through the lens of racism. The elder Brandon, who created Luther in the late sixties, and was later syndicated by the Los Angeles Times Syndicate until 1986, was also known for his blistering editorial cartoons. Where I’m Coming From is the work of his youngest daughter, the nation’s first Black woman cartoonist in the mainstream press; it debuted in 1989 in the Detroit Free Press. Universal Press Syndicate later distributed her provocative feature until 2005. For six decades, their respective pens lay bare the truth: Nothing has changed. This retrospective reveals how vividly the specter of racism remains in America… STILL.  

This exhibition originated at Medialia Gallery in New York City. The Ohio State University’s installation will include original Luther cartoons from the Brumsic Brandon, Jr. Collection at the Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum. STILL is curated by Tara Nakashima Donahue. 

Save the Date: Opening reception and program with Barbara Brandon-Croft and Tara Nakashima Donahue at the Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum on Saturday, May 21 at 6 p.m.  

“STILL… Racism in America” Exhibit Reception

May 21
6-8 p.m.
The Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum
1813 N. High Street, Columbus, OH 43210

Join us on Saturday, May 21 to celebrate the opening of STILL… Racism in America: A Retrospective in Cartoons, featuring the work of Barbara Brandon-Croft and Brumsic Brandon, Jr.
   
6–7 p.m.: Explore the exhibit and enjoy refreshments
7–8 p.m.: Program with Barbara Brandon-Croft and curator Tara Nakashima Donohue
   
Pioneering father/daughter cartoonists Brumsic Brandon, Jr. (1927–2014) and Barbara Brandon-Croft (1958– ) chronicled the nation’s cultural landscape in their comic strips through the lens of racism. The elder Brandon, who created Luther in the late sixties and was later syndicated by the Los Angeles Times Syndicate until 1986, was also known for his blistering editorial cartoons. Where I’m Coming From is the work of his youngest daughter, the nation’s first Black woman cartoonist in the mainstream press; it debuted in 1989 in the Detroit Free Press. Universal Press Syndicate later distributed her provocative feature until 2005. For six decades, their respective pens lay bare the truth: Nothing has changed. This retrospective reveals how vividly the specter of racism remains in America… STILL.
   
Also on display starting May 21: Celebrating Sparky: Charles M. Schulz and Peanuts
   
Unable to join us in person? Sign up for a livestream of the 7 p.m. program on Zoom.

Diekmann and Lewandowski Receive Collaborator’s Award

Florian Diekmann, head of the Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences Library and Student Success Center, and Monica Lewandowski, assistant professor in the Department of Plant Pathology, were selected as recipients of Chadwick Arboretum and Learning Gardens’ Collaborator’s Award for their curation of the exhibit Protecting Plants, People, and the World: Celebrating Ohio State’s Commitment to Plant Health.

Florian has been involved for years in helping Chadwick Arboretum catalog and curate the more than 750 botanical illustrations of the Dr. Emanuel Rudolph Botanical Prints Collection that were given to Chadwick Arboretum in the 1990’s. These prints were once on display in the Columbus Museum of Art and have been waiting for their next showcase ever since.  

In the planning stages of the exhibit, Florian and Monica worked diligently to choose 16 beautiful examples of what exists in this collection, while also finding thoughtful ways to promote and showcase the arboretum in Thompson Library, a very public space on main campus. 

“This exhibit is truly fascinating, inspiring, and engaging – and could only have happened by these two remarkable scholars and educators,” said Julia Wilson, program coordinator at Chadwick Arboretum. “Thank you so much, Florian and Monica!”

Sara Hess & Hannah McCasland: Flux of Effection

February 25 – April 8 
Fine Arts Library
1871 North High Street

Open during Fine Arts Library hours

Flux of Effection couples the studio practices of Hannah McCasland and Sara Hess. This site-responsive installation arranges a landscape of objects and images constructed both independently and collaboratively through material call-and response. Ceramics and works on paper are wedged, nestled and suspended. Objects are composed and all planes of the shelves are activated to create a confined, immersive space. The work is a dialogue and recognition of our overlapping sensibilities through contrasting materials and processes. Within this collaboration, the artists explore ideas of steering without direction – meandering through a new environment to locate moments of uncanny familiarity and anticipated solace. They hope to convey the balance, complexity and fluctuation of partnership, flirting between unstructured and structured materials, forms and physicalities. As the objects and images communicate and energize one another, the artists draw parallels to the effects of human interaction and affection or a lack thereof.

About the Artists

Hannah McCasland is an artist currently living and working in Columbus, Ohio. Previously, Hannah was living in Northern New York where she received a BFA in Studio Art from SUNY Plattsburgh. At SUNY, she studied ceramics and sculpture. She is currently an MFA candidate at The Ohio State University. Hannah has exhibited regionally as well as nationally.

Sara Hess is an artist living and working in Columbus, Ohio. Sara holds a BFA in Studio Art from the University of Georgia’s Lamar Dodd School of Art, where she studied painting and printmaking. She is currently an MFA candidate and Graduate Fellow at The Ohio State University. Sara has exhibited her work regionally and nationally, most recently at ATHICA in Athens, Georgia, Stove Works in Chattanooga, Tennessee and International Print Center New York in Manhattan, New York.

The Department of Planetary Futures: ACSE Laboratory Special Collections Fluid Preserved Planetesimal Specimens Archive

A variety of onions preserved in vinegar, suspended in clear glass jars.

On view at the Fine Arts Library
February 4 – April 18
Open during library hours

The Department of Planetary Futures (DPF) Special Collections Fluid Preserved Planetesimal Specimens Archive is an exhibition by Jacklyn Brickman of the Department’s preserved planetesimals collection. The exhibition will include 54 jars containing onion planetesimals preserved in vinegar, a publication outlining the scientific processes of DPF, lab book, archival images and a video tour and explanation of the Allium Cepa Stella Erratica (ACSE) Nebular Mitosis laboratory.

DPF is a fictional entity through which multi-species collaborative experiments are employed to investigate the interrelationships humans have with other life forms and one another. At the heart of these endeavors is a desire to connect to the surrounding world and its organisms with care and humility; to learn from, engage with and speculate possible livable futures through an intersectional feminist lens.

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Revisiting Between Spaces

A photo of numerous clay disks, each stamped with a roman numeral.

Revisiting Between Spaces

January 24 – April 28, 2022
Fine Arts Library
Open during library hours

The Fine Arts Library is pleased to announce an exhibition by Tamryn McDermott titled Revisiting Between Spaces. 

Mixed media artist Tamryn McDermott asks the viewer to navigate a history through an archive of handmade objects and a corresponding catalog. McDermott’s fabrication and contextualization of terracotta impressions map and link us to a distant classical past. Each object in this exhibition relates to a specific location in time and space. The display of this collection continues to evolve by being deconstructed, reshaped and restitched by the artist, a revisiting over time. What are the limitations of an archive? What is excluded from the archive? How do records continue to evolve and change over time?

This exhibition will be open January 24 through April 29, 2022. The artist will be present for an open house and dialogue about the work on display in the Fine Arts Library on March 25 at 1 p.m. The exhibition is open during library hours.

Artist Bio:

Tamryn is a PhD student in the Arts Administration, Education and Policy (AAEP) program with a concentration in Art Education. Tamryn is an artist, educator and arts administrator with experience in museums, schools, organizations and universities. She is currently the Graduate Research Associate for the Kawsay Ukhunchay: Andean and Amazonian Indigenous Art and Cultural Artifacts Research Collection at Ohio State. Tamryn is also a Graduate Teaching Associate within AAEP and works as a university supervisor for pre-service art education students and teaches Introduction to Art Education within the department. Her research interests are in interdisciplinary and integrated learning within a higher education context.

Prior to arriving at Ohio State in fall 2020, she managed nine temporary public art projects at Penn State University as part of the university’s Campus Arts Initiative. Tamryn was the Traveling Exhibition Manager for Rooted, Revived, Reinvented: Basketry in Americaa contemporary and historic basketry exhibition that traveled to nine venues across the United States from 2017-2019. As an artist, Tamryn works with materials (silk, wax, wood, steel, terracotta, hand-made paper, waxed linen) and history as a way to investigate how we apply meaning to objects to tell and re-tell stories about our past through the archive. 

 

 

Gatherings: The Social, Material and Cultural Networks of Books from 1450-1800

Two books talking to each other. One says, "Think it'll be a good gathering?" The other replies, "It's bound to be!"

December 15, 2021 
Noon-2 p.m.
Thompson Library
Rooms 150A&B

Join the student curators from the History of the Book course (MEDREN 5611) for a live exhibition highlighting materials from the Rare Books & Manuscripts Library.
   
In book making, a “gathering” is several leaves of paper bound into a single unit—the essential building block of the codex as an object. The varying uses of books in the world reflect this material aspect of their creation: books are fundamentally social objects that create novel methods and opportunities for gathering. This exhibition examines material features of books from the hand-press period (1450–1800) in the Rare Books & Manuscripts Library for evidence of how they bring together people and ideas across boundaries of space, time, identity and ideology.

Power Lines: Comics and the Environment

Power Lines: Comics and the Environment

November 13, 2021 – May 8, 2022
Exhibit Hours: 1:00 PM – 5:00 PM
Open Tuesday – Sunday
Free and open to the public

The Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum
1813 N. High Street
Columbus, OH 43210

At the start of the 21st century, the term Anthropocene was coined to describe a new geological epoch defined by humanity’s transformation of the natural world.  Scientists have long known that human beings have a complex relationship to the world we inhabit. We survive and thrive thanks to the earth’s many resources, but we also cause irreparable harm to the planet. This exhibit surveys over 100 years of comics that depict the pleasures and dangers of human interaction with the environment. Comics have captured it all—including fears about pollution, the celebration of nature preserves, anger at the failures of the Environmental Protection Agency, and the recognition of the ways environmental destruction and global warming disproportionately affect people of color. 

Curated by Jared Gardner and Elizabeth Hewitt. 

Dark Laughter Revisited: The Life and Times of Ollie Harrington

Dark Laughter Revisited: The Life and Times of Ollie Harrington

November 13, 2021 – May 8, 2022
Exhibit Hours: 1-5 p.m.
Open Tuesday – Sunday
Free and open to the public

The Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum
1813 N. High Street
Columbus, OH 43210

Throughout his career, Oliver “Ollie” Harrington (1912-1995) used his voice and artistic talents as a cartoonist to attack racial, economic and social injustice with razor-sharp wit and insight. Speaking from the perspective of a cartoonist of color, his commentary chronicles many of the events and issues that defined the 20th century, from segregation and apartheid, to war and poverty. Harrington’s life and career intersected with the Harlem Renaissance, the Civil Rights movement, the Black émigré community in Paris after WWII, and communist East Germany. Many of Harrington’s cartoons remain relevant and speak to problems that sadly are still unresolved in contemporary times. 

Starting in the 1930s, Harrington’s work was widely published in the Black Press including the New York Amsterdam News, the Pittsburgh Courier and the People’s Voice.  His long-running series Dark Laughter (later known as Bootsie), cast a satirical, yet affectionate, gaze on Black America through the adventures of an observant African-American “everyman.” 

Harrington was an unapologetic activist and critic of racism and capitalism, who emigrated to Paris in 1952 and, ultimately to Berlin in 1961, in response to concerns about FBI surveillance due to his outspoken criticism of the U.S. government. During World War II, he served as a war correspondent and later worked briefly as the NAACP public relations director. Later in his career, he also published trenchant editorial cartoons in the Daily World and the German satirical publication, Eulenspiegel.   

This retrospective exhibition features work from the private collection of Dr. Walter O. Evans as well as the Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum’s Oliver Harrington Collection, acquired from his widow, Dr. Helma Harrington.   

Curated by Jenny E. Robb and Dr. Kay Clopton.

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