Author: Sandra Enimil (page 1 of 3)

Copyright Services Rights Review Project

In Fall 2018, Copyright Services began a pilot rights review project of material, mainly images, available through the Digital Collectionshttps://library.osu.edu/dc (DC). The original goal was to research the copyright status of material in the DC and to select the appropriate rightsstatement to submit material to the Digital Public Library of America. We also had a goal of learning what content may be in the public domain. In beginning this project, we were inspired by the work of the University of Michigan’s Copyright Review Management System and the New York Public Library in determining copyright status of items in their collections.

We have had at least one student, and as many as three, working on this project since then. We’ve had a student in high school, undergraduates, law and graduate students working with us. Important skills we look for in a student are interest in copyright, research, and strong writing abilities. We provide training on copyright and how to research rights status to each student.

We ask the students to create detailed research reports on the artists and creators as listed in the DC. Here’s what the students look for and where they look:

Information for the rights review:

  • Who created the work and in what capacity (e.g. individual v. employee)?
  • What type of work are we evaluating?
  • Where was the work created/published?
  • When was the work created/published?
  • Why was the work created (to be used for a private/internal purpose or to be distributed to the public)?

Where they look:

The students access internal and external facing databases within the libraries. They may also visit the collection in person, search for registration and renewal records through the U.S. Copyright Office’s Copyright Catalog and through earlier digitized copies of the Catalog of Copyright Entries, and conduct outside online research on the creators in order to better understand the work they created and their professional lives.

The students also now use spreadsheets to track item level information for each collection.

These two documents (the narrative research document and the excel spreadsheet) will eventually be available for our curators and librarians to use.  

The process can take anywhere from a few days to several weeks, depending on the depth of research needed. We cannot say for certain how long a review will take since the type of content and creators can vary. A typical rights review may involve research into the creator, their employment history, the publication a work was distributed in, a search through copyright registration and renewal files, and determination of public domain status under U.S. copyright law. 

We are undertaking this rights review to provide more complete and accurate information, specifically about copyright for the collections that researchers and the general public can access online. We appreciate the help and support that we’ve received so far. Because copyright creators and rightsholders are important in determining copyright ownership and status, the rights reviews are, where possible, focused on a particular author or creator. To continue to move forward we have requested from our colleagues in the Libraries:

  • Departmental priorities for authors/collections
  • Any known information/resources about the creators, for example:
    • birth/death dates
    • creation dates
    • copyright dates/notice
    • work history

This project has been extremely worthwhile and hopefully others can see the value in the work we are doing. For our students, we are providing meaningful work. The students learn or enhance their attention to detail, research, and writing skills. Additionally, they are able to see a tangible outcome of their work in updates to the Digital Collections or progression for other digital projects within the Libraries.

We have expanded the reviews to include content that may or may not be added to the DC. These additional reviews have varying levels of research and evaluation of status, but it has increased our involvement in looking into rights status for content for our Libraries.

If you are interested in learning more about how to get started with your own rights review project, please get in touch with us.

 

Additional Materials:

Copyright Review Student Training Manual

Ballinger, Linda, Brandy Karl, and Anastasia Chiu. 2017. “Providing Quality Rights Metadata for Digital Collections Through RightsStatements.Org.” Pennsylvania Libraries: Research & Practice 5 (2): 144–58. https://doi.org/10.5195/palrap.2017.157.

 

Copyright Services Celebrates Open Access Week 2018

Please join Copyright Services as we celebrate Open Access Week, October 22-26, 2018!

Open Access Week Logo

Paywall: The Business of Scholarship (Film Screening)

Wednesday, October 24 @ 3:00 pm – 5:00 pm

As part of Open Access Week, join us for a screening of the documentary Paywall: The Business of Scholarship, a film that focuses on the need for open access to research and science, questions the rationale behind the $10-25 billion a year that flows to for-profit academic publishers, and examines the 35-40% profit margin associated with the top academic publisher Elsevier. After the hour long film, stay for a panel-facilitated audience discussion.

Light refreshments will be served. Sponsored by the University Libraries’ Research Commons and Scholarly Sharing Program Area and the Health Sciences Library.

Who: OSU faculty, staff, and students from all disciplines
When: Wednesday, October 24, 3:00 – 5:00 p.m.
Where: Thompson Library, Room 165 

 

Open Teaching, Learning, and Research: Making Your Scholarship More Affordable and Accessible through Open Licensing (Presentation)

Friday, October 26 @ 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm

During Open Access Week, join the University Libraries’ Copyright Services to learn more about the benefits and special considerations in making your scholarship and teaching materials openly available. This presentation will provide an introduction to the rights provided to authors under copyright law and review important points of OSU’s IP policy. We will explore the different open license options provided by Creative Commons and discuss how those licenses can be utilized in your teaching and research.

Who: OSU faculty, staff, and students from all disciplines
When: Friday, October 26, 1:00 – 3:00 p.m.
Where: Research Commons, 3rd floor of 18th Avenue Library

Open Access Week Events

Please join Copyright Services at these upcoming Open Access Week events:

Open Access Week: Copyright Trivia 
October 23 @ 3:00 pm – 5:00 pm
Do you have what it takes to be crowned Copyright Champion? Join the University Libraries’ Copyright Services for a short introduction to copyright workshop, where you will learn the many important ways copyright law interacts with your daily academic life. Then test your copyright knowledge and compete for glory and prizes in the Copyright Trivia Championships! This event is in celebration of International Open Access Week.

Who: OSU faculty, staff, and students from all disciplines
When: Monday, October 23, 3:00 – 5:00 p.m.
Where: Research Commons, 3rd floor of 18th Avenue Library

Register here: https://library.osu.edu/researchcommons/event/copyright-trivia/ 

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Open Access Week: Considerations and Benefits of Open Access Scholarship 
October 26 @ 3:00 pm – 5:00 pm
Join the University Libraries and the Health Sciences Library for a workshop focused on the theme of this year’s International Open Access Week: “Open in Order to _______________________.”

Open in order to: raise the visibility of your research; increase the impact of your scholarship; and increase access to knowledge.

This workshop will cover the basics of copyright and Open Access, including understanding your rights as an author, sharing your research to a broader audience, publishing in Open Access journals, and funding models and support. Participants will also be invited to explore topics of interest in small facilitated group discussions.

Who: OSU faculty, staff, and students from all disciplines
When: Thursday, October 26, 3:00 – 5:00 p.m.
Where: Research Commons, 3rd floor of 18th Avenue Library

Register here: https://library.osu.edu/researchcommons/event/open-scholarship/

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OSU Open Access Monograph Initiative
October 27 @ 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm

The Ohio State University Libraries (OSUL) is launching a new initiative to fund Open Access scholarly monographs in the humanities and humanistic social sciences. OSUL has committed to funding three $15,000 awards a year for five years. Awards will be provided as subventions to participating university presses. To learn more about this initiative and how to submit a proposal, please attend this information session.

Who: OSU faculty
When: Friday, October 27, 1:00 – 2:00 p.m.
Where: Research Commons, 3rd floor of 18th Avenue Library

Register here: https://library.osu.edu/researchcommons/event/monograph-initiative/

 

 

Exploring Challenges and Opportunities Surrounding Our Collections of Recorded Student Musical Performances

The OSU Music and Dance Library has a sizable collection of recorded student musical performances encompassing individual students’ recitals and ensemble performances. The collection exists on a variety of media, some of which is deteriorating, is anticipated to deteriorate within the foreseeable future or is in an obsolete format . The Music and Dance Library is working with the Copyright Resources Center to explore options for preserving these artifacts of scholarly and creative activities at The Ohio State University and making them available for research and education.

As part of our initial information gathering, we collaborated with Alan Green and Sean Ferguson at the Music and Dance Library to craft an informal survey that would be sent their colleagues at other institutions on managing rights issues for similar collections. Based on the results of this survey, we found that other institutions are facing the same questions and conundrums and many survey participants indicated that they are also in the early or exploratory stages of developing or implementing plans for managing their collections of recorded student musical performances. While this appears to be an area of interest for many libraries, it will require further development and study within the profession before significant trends and community practices begin to emerge.  Though we are still gathering information, we have a few initial thoughts to share.

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Open Access Week 2015

Open Access Logo

Next week is Open Access Week (October 19-25)! Open Access (OA) is a global movement that encourages making scholarly resources more freely available over the internet in order to maximize the impact and accessibility of research, especially research that has been funded with public money. Open Access Week is an event where members of the academic and research community teach, learn, and share information about the OA publishing model.

Want to learn more about Open Access? View the resources linked below:

And check out the workshops and initiatives happening at Ohio State in support of Open Access:

Open Access Publishing: Potentials and Pitfalls (Discussion Forum)

Are you curious about open access publishing? Have you published in an open access journal, or are you considering this as a possibility? Have you received questionable solicitations to publish your research or had a run-in with a predatory publisher? If you answered yes to any of these questions and want to know more about who can help, join Sandra Enimil (Head, Copyright Resources Center) and Melanie Schlosser (Digital Publishing Librarian) to learn some tips for steering clear of unethical publishing practices and some ways that researchers can benefit from scholarly open access publishing.

Who: OSU faculty, graduates, and postdocs
When: Wednesday, October 21, 12:00 – 1:00pm
Where: Thompson Library, Room 165

Register here: https://library.osu.edu/researchcommons/event/open-access-discussion/

Lunch & Learn: Creative Commons

Please join the University Libraries’ Copyright Resources Center for a lunch and learn about Creative Commons (CC). The session will introduce CC and explore how CC licenses benefit creators and users of licensed material. These licenses contribute to affordability and the development and use of Open Educational Resources, a particularly relevant topic for us in light of the university-wide focus on affordable learning. Bring your lunch and your questions!

Who: OSU faculty, staff, and students
When: Thursday, October 22, 12:00 – 1:00pm
Where: Thompson Library, Room 204

Space is limited. Please RSVP at the following link: http://goo.gl/forms/ciSlGzvOga

Changes to OSU Libraries’ website copyright information and licensing

In support of Libre Open Access, content on The Ohio State University Libraries’ (OSUL) website for which OSUL owns the copyright (or has permission to sublicense) will be licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license.  The CC BY license enables others to share, reuse, and remix OSUL content so long as they credit The Ohio State University Libraries as the source of the original material and they indicate if changes have been made. For more information, please visit: https://go.osu.edu/osul-copyright-info.

Open Access at The Ohio State University Libraries

More than 20,000 theses and dissertations by Ohio State students are open access via the Libraries’ partnership with the OhioLINK ETD Center. With participation from thirty universities and colleges in Ohio, the OhioLink ETD Center houses a combined collection of over 50,000 electronic theses and dissertations and has over 25 million total downloads worldwide.

The Libraries Publishing Program works with faculty, students, and academic units at OSU to publish open access scholarly work in a variety of formats. This program provides free or low-cost publication development and hosting, and serves as an alternative to working with a commercial publisher.

OSU’s institutional repository, the Knowledge Bank, provides digital content publishing and archiving for OSU faculty, staff, and graduate students. Many materials in the Knowledge Bank are available open access.

The Faculty of The Ohio State University Libraries is committed to disseminating the fruits of its research and scholarship as widely as possible. In keeping with that commitment, the Faculty adopted an open access resolution effective July 1, 2012: The Ohio State University Libraries Open Access Resolution

 

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By Jessica Chan, Rights Management Specialist at the Copyright Resources Center, The Ohio State University Libraries

Copyright in the Libraries: Special Collections

Copyright touches many library services because we collect, share and loan original works fixed in a wide variety of tangible media. The Copyright Resources Center conducted a series of informational interviews with faculty and staff from various areas of The Ohio State University Libraries to discuss the ways in which they engage with copyright issues. This blog series documents those conversations, and highlights how copyright law helps to shape services provided by the Libraries. See all posts in the series here.

photo of Nena Couch

Nena Couch, Head of Special Collections

The Ohio State University Libraries are home to several special collections spanning a variety of subject areas. These collections contain many rare, primary source, and unique materials around a particular topic or area of study, and serve as a rich resource for education, research, and other projects. Special collections often contain objects beyond traditional publications, lending additional complexity to copyright questions regarding these materials. I met with Nena Couch, Head of Thompson Library Special Collections, and Beth Kattelman, Associate Professor and Curator of Theatre, to discuss the ways that copyright influences the Libraries’ special collections such as the Jerome Lawrence and Robert E. Lee Theatre Research Institute (TRI).

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Copyright in the Libraries: Music and Dance Library

Photo of Alan Green

Alan Green,
Head Librarian for Music and Dance and
Adjunct Professor at the School of Music

Copyright touches many library services because we collect, share and loan original works fixed in a wide variety of tangible media. The Copyright Resources Center conducted a series of informational interviews with faculty and staff from various areas of The Ohio State University Libraries to discuss the ways in which they engage with copyright issues. This blog series documents those conversations, and highlights how copyright law helps to shape services provided by the Libraries. See all available posts in the series here.

The Music and Dance Library at The Ohio State University houses a diverse collection of materials in a wide variety of media: compact disc and tape recordings, books, sheet music, DVDs, VHS, serials, vinyl records, and more. I met with Alan Green, Head Librarian for Music and Dance and Adjunct Professor at the School of Music, and Sean Ferguson, an Assistant Librarian at the Music and Dance Library, to discuss the ways that copyright affects their services, collections, and patrons.

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Copyright in the Libraries: Fine Arts Library

Copyright touches many library services because we collect, share and loan original works fixed in a wide variety of tangible media. The Copyright Resources Center conducted a series of informational interviews with faculty and staff from various areas of The OSU Libraries to discuss the ways in which they engage with copyright issues. This blog series documents those conversations, and highlights how copyright law helps to shape services provided by the Libraries. See all available posts in the series here.

Profile photo of Sarah Falls

Sarah Falls, Fine Arts Librarian

Sarah Falls, Assistant Professor, is the Head of the Fine Arts Library at OSU, and as Fine Arts Librarian, Sarah supports the Departments of DesignArt, History of Art, Arts Administration, Education and Policy, and the Advanced Computing Center for the Arts and Design. I met with Sarah to discuss copyright and the arts, and the unique influence copyright exerts on these particular disciplines.

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Copyright in the Libraries: eReserves

Note: This blog has been updated to reflect the fact that the eReserves service within the University Libraries has been discontinued.

Copyright touches many library services because we collect, share and loan original works fixed in a wide variety of tangible media. The Copyright Resources Center conducted a series of informational interviews with faculty and staff from various areas of The Ohio State University Libraries to discuss the ways in which they engage with copyright issues. This blog series documents those conversations, and highlights how copyright law helps to shape services provided by the Libraries. See all available posts in the series here.

The Ohio State University Libraries previously provided an eReserves service to assist instructors with uploading supplementary course readings to Carmen (the learning management system used at OSU). Terry Camelford, the Program Coordinator for eReserves, met with me to discuss her team’s work and how they navigated the copyright issues related to eReserves.

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Copyright in the Libraries: Digital Content Services (Part 2)

Copyright touches many library services because we collect, share and loan original works fixed in a wide variety of tangible media. The Copyright Resources Center conducted a series of informational interviews with faculty and staff from various areas of The Ohio State University Libraries to discuss the ways in which they engage with copyright issues. This blog series documents those conversations, and highlights how copyright law helps to shape services provided by the Libraries. See all posts in the series here.

Photo of Maureen Walsh

Maureen Walsh,
Institutional Repository Services Librarian

Digital Content Services at The OSU Libraries includes the Libraries’ Publishing Program and the Knowledge Bank, OSU’s institutional repository (this post focuses on the Knowledge Bank, while Digital Content Services: Part 1 discussed the Libraries’ Publishing Program). Melanie Schlosser (Digital Publishing Librarian) and Maureen Walsh (Institutional Repository Services Librarian) are interim co-heads of Digital Content Services; Melanie and Maureen met with me to discuss the ways that copyright affects their work in the publishing program and the institutional repository. In fact, they observed that not a day goes by when they aren’t thinking about copyright, as they are constantly working with copyrighted materials and “someone else’s content.”

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