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Tag: Story Maps

Save the Date: GIS Day 2020

GIS Day logo

GIS Day is an annual event for students, staff, faculty, and the broader community to learn more about Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and to celebrate the power of geospatial analysis and visualization in answering research questions and solving real-world problems. This year, GIS Day is happening on Wednesday, November 18, and we hope you’ll mark your calendars so you can participate. We’re excited to bring you a different kind of GIS Day experience this year and to tell you a bit about what we have in the works.

In the past, we’ve hosted in-person GIS Day events, but we decided early in the discussions about returning to campus for autumn semester that this would not be a good idea in 2020. The first important change for this year is that we’re going virtual!

A virtual GIS Day provides us with a great opportunity to broaden participation in the program. Another important change this year is that our GIS Day 2020 program will be a collaboration between The Ohio State University, Case Western Reserve University, and the University of Cincinnati. Get ready for 3C GIS Day!

We’re in the early stages of planning, but we look forward to an exciting program that will include:

  • Lightning Talks
    • Learn about the application of geospatial technologies in a wide variety of disciplines from faculty, staff, students, and GIS professionals across Ohio’s 3C Corridor (Cleveland, Columbus, and Cincinnati).
  • StoryMaps Showcase
    • We’re inviting any students, staff, and faculty affiliated with The Ohio State University, Case Western Reserve University, and the University of Cincinnati to create and submit ArcGIS StoryMaps to showcase their work on GIS Day and beyond. More details about the StoryMaps Showcase will be coming soon!
  • Professional Networking
    • We will provide a venue for GIS professionals, researchers, and students from across Ohio to connect with one another and discuss experiences, opportunities, and current topics of interest in the world of geospatial.

Stay tuned for more information about 3C GIS Day in the coming weeks and months, and mark your calendars for a great event on November 18, 2020!

The 3C GIS Day planning committee includes Josh Sadvari and Katie Phillips (OSU), Ben Gorham (Case), and Amy Koshoffer (UC). If you have any questions about 3C GIS Day or are interested in participating and want to receive updates, please contact Josh and Katie at geospatial@osu.edu.

ArcGIS StoryMaps Workshop Now Available Online

During the spring semester, Katie Phillips (Outreach Coordinator, Center for Urban and Regional Analysis) and I have been working together to develop a workshop introducing Ohio State faculty, staff, and students to the possible uses of the new ArcGIS StoryMaps platform for research and teaching. We originally intended to offer this as an in-person session on March 31, but like many others across the university, have transitioned to instead provide an online learning opportunity.

Since all of this content is now available online, we wanted to open it up to anyone who might be interested in completing (or reusing) the exercise. Here’s what you need to know:

  1. The workshop is now intended as an asynchronous online exercise that can be completed at your own pace. We expect the exercise will take most people about an hour to complete. All of the content is accessible in BuckeyeBox here: go.osu.edu/storymaps-virtual. The theme of the workshop story map is the U.S. Census, and a completed version is available here for reference.
  2.  In BuckeyeBox, the ArcGIS StoryMaps Exercise folder contains the exercise instructions and all of the content you’ll be adding to your story map. Start with the StoryMaps_Exercise_20200331 document. The other files are referenced in the appropriate task within the exercise instructions. All of the files are available for download.
  3. The Additional Resources folder contains documents that may be useful for planning your own projects and assignments, along with a list of links to other available resources and relevant online training.
  4. We intend to keep these materials publicly available on BuckeyeBox and ArcGIS Online, until at least August 31, 2020If you are an instructor looking for an asynchronous activity to assign to your students as part of the spring semester online transition (and possibly beyond), please feel free to reuse this activity as is or to modify it to best fit your course needs. The exercise instructions and task content files are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License. If you would like to reuse this activity and have any questions before doing so, please contact me at sadvari.1@osu.edu.
  5. For all Ohio State affiliates, task 1 in the exercise will walk you through the process of creating/signing in to an ArcGIS Online organizational account tied to your OSU name.# and password. For anyone not affiliated with OSU, you should be able to work through the exercise in its entirety if you have an ArcGIS Online organizational account through your place of work. If you are not an OSU affiliate and you are also not part of another ArcGIS Online organization, you should be able to complete most of the activity (with the exception of a few steps related to adding specific types of content) using an ArcGIS Online public account, which you can create here: https://www.esri.com/en-us/arcgis/products/create-account.
  6. If you encounter any issues or have any questions as you work through this activity, please do not hesitate to reach out to Katie (phillips.1870@osu.edu) and myself (sadvari.1@osu.edu). If after the exercise, you would like to speak more about using ArcGIS StoryMaps for your own projects, please let us know how we can help. We’re both available for virtual consultations and would look forward to hearing from you!

Sharing Your Research with Story Maps (Workshop)

Want to make a map that will help you share the stories being uncovered through your research and make them accessible to a broader audience? ArcGIS Story Maps combine maps, data, and multimedia content – text, photos, videos, and audio – to communicate information effectively through interactive and user-friendly web mapping applications. In this workshop, participants will:

  • Sign-up for access to ArcGIS Online using their OSU username and password
  • Explore the Story Maps gallery and learn more about the wide range of web app templates available
  • Build a Story Map to illustrate an example of their use in communicating research topics

BYOD – Attendees are encouraged to bring their own laptops or tablets for hands-on participation, and our presenter will be available afterward for consultations.

Who:  OSU faculty, postdocs, and students from all disciplines
When: Monday, April 15 3:00 – 4:30 p.m.
Where: Research Commons, 3rd floor of 18th Avenue Library

Sharing Your Research with Story Maps (Workshop)

Want to make a map that will help you share the stories being uncovered through your research and make them accessible to a broader audience? ArcGIS Story Maps combine maps, data, and multimedia content – text, photos, videos, and audio – to communicate information effectively through interactive and user-friendly web mapping applications. In this workshop, participants will:

  • Sign-up for access to ArcGIS Online using their OSU username and password
  • Explore the Story Maps gallery and learn more about the wide range of web app templates available
  • Build a Story Map to illustrate an example of their use in communicating research topics

BYOD – Attendees are encouraged to bring their own laptops or tablets for hands-on participation, and our presenter will be available afterward for consultations.

Who: OSU faculty, staff, and students from all disciplines
When: Tuesday, November 27, 3:00 – 4:30 p.m.
Where: Research Commons, 3rd floor of 18th Avenue

Love Data Week: Telling Stories with Maps

As Sharon mentioned in her post yesterday, this year’s theme for Love Data Week is Data Stories. One of the topics under that theme is Telling Stories With Data, and there are a whole bunch of apps for that if your goal is to tell stories around geographic data. Esri’s Story Map app templates provide a user-friendly way to combine maps with text, images, and other multimedia content to “harness the power of maps and geography to tell your story.” There’s also a huge gallery of Story Maps submitted by the Esri team and the wider user community that you can explore to see what kinds of stories are being told and find some inspiration for using such a platform to tell your own. I’ll share a few examples below so you can get a better idea of the look and feel of some different Story Map apps.

Prior to joining the OSU Libraries, I was a graduate student studying anthropology, and I remember a Smithsonian Magazine link coming across my desk that included a Story Map (Journal) called Welcome to the Anthropocene. One of the nice things about this example is that it highlights your ability to embed a Story Map in a webpage in addition to being able to share them as standalone apps. Another effective Story Map (Map Series – Tabbed) that I’ve encountered was created by the Esri Story Maps Team following the 10-year anniversary of Hurricane Katrina and made use of a variety of data sources to tell the story of the social and physical changes that took place in New Orleans following that disaster as well as the ongoing recovery.

In addition to these more research-oriented examples, there are good instances of Story Maps being used by government and non-profit organizations to disseminate information more broadly to their communities and the general public. Here’s a good local example of a Story Map (Shortlist) from the City of Westerville that provides updates on the status of development projects and street/sidewalk maintenance programs. I hope that from these few examples, you will have gotten an idea of the potential for using Story Map apps to tell stories with geographic data in an interactive platform that allows for engaging with a wide audience.

Go Westerville Story Map Screenshot

If you are interested in creating your own Story Maps (or web mapping apps with one of the many other configurable templates available), the first step is to get signed up for an ArcGIS Online account using your OSU username and password. The next step is to start doing some hands-on exploring of the various app templates to think about which one might be the best for the story you are trying to tell with your data, and if you have any questions along the way send me an email or schedule a consultation for some assistance.

In tomorrow’s post, you’ll hear more about Data Stories from Lee-Arng Chang, our Data Visualization Specialist so I’ll leave you with one last example that I recently shared with him. The Insights for ArcGIS team recently put together a Story Map (Cascade) called Selecting the Right Data Visualization that highlights the functionality of this template for creating a visually appealing website (even without much of a focus on geographic data in this case).