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Tag: Science Cafe (page 1 of 3)

Science Café: Modeling the COVID-19 Pandemic in Ohio

Over the last several weeks many mathematicians, statisticians and data scientists have found themselves involved with various efforts in response to the public health crisis caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. Did predictive modeling really help with COVID preparedness and decision making? 

Following up on his earlier lectures on the topic over the summer, Dr. Grzegorz Rempala, Ohio State Professor of Public Health and Mathematics, will give a perspective of how various mathematical methods turned out to work (or not) in practical settings of the daily predictions of the pandemic size in Ohio. In particular, he will briefly outline some new ideas and possible improvements in current plans for pandemic effects mitigation.

Who: All Ohio State affiliates and community members
When: Wednesday, October 7 at 6:30 p.m.
Where: Zoom

→ Learn More Here←

If you require an accommodation such as live captioning or interpretation to participate in this event, please contact libevents@osu.edu as soon as possible. Requests made at least one week prior to the event will generally allow us to provide seamless access, but the university will make every effort to meet requests made after this date. A captioned recording of this program will be posted on the University Libraries website within 10 business days following the event.

Science Café: Meeting The Need To Belong In An Age Of Isolation

This talk will explore the core social motives that drive much of human behavior, particularly the need to belong. We’ll explore some interesting consequences of these motives, and discuss how people might meet these needs during the age of COVID-19. 

Who: All Ohio State affiliates and community members
When: Wednesday, September 2 at 6:30 p.m.
Where: Zoom

→ CLICK HERE TO REGISTER ←

Science Café: Engineering Oxygen Therapeutics For Use In Transfusion Medicine

Universal oxygen (O2) carrying solutions that can replace the O2 storage and transport functions of red blood cells (RBCs) will greatly improve clinical outcomes for trauma victims and patients undergoing high-blood-loss surgical procedures. These O2 carriers are to be used when blood is not readily available, such as on the battlefield, during natural disasters, at the site of a terrorist attack or in rural areas without hospital access. My talk will address a simple approach for designing hemoglobin-based O2 carriers (HBOCs) as RBC substitutes. This work is significant in that it will lead to the development of novel materials that are safe and efficacious for use in transfusion medicine.

About our speaker:

Andre Palmer, Professor and Ohio Eminent Scholar in Nanotechnology

Professor Palmer’s research interests encompass the development of novel hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers for a variety of applications in transfusion medicine and tissue engineering. He served as department chair of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering from 2014-2019. In 2015, he was inducted into the College of Fellows of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering. Palmer’s research is supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health and the Department of Defense.

Sponsors
Sigma Xi – The Ohio State University Chapter
The Ohio State University Libraries

Open to all Ohio State affiliates and community members. No registration required.

Science Café: How Studying Ocean Viruses May Help Save the Earth and Cure Disease

Microbes drive energy and nutrient cycling that fuels the Earth, and viruses modulate these microbial impacts via killing, reprogramming and gene transfer. As environmental virology studies the global virosphere (the diversity of viruses in nature), we face challenges to organize this ‘sequence space’ (create a sequence-based viral taxonomy), link viruses to their hosts (who infects whom), and establish how virus populations are structured (ecological drivers) and alter ecosystems (their impacts). Here I will review how we study viruses in complex communities, new biology being revealed, and how that will help fight climate change and spur a new generation of medical treatments.

About our speaker:

Matthew Sullivan, Professor of Microbiology and Civil, Environmental and Geodetic Engineering

Ohio State Professor Matthew B. Sullivan pioneers approaches to better “see” viruses that infect microbes in the oceans, soils, and humans. He earned his Ph.D. from MIT and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in 2004, co-founded the UA Ecosystem Genomics Institute, and is recognized as a Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation Investigator, Kavli Frontiers in Science Fellow, and co-director of the Microbial Communities Program at OSU’s Infectious Disease Institute.

Sponsors
Sigma Xi – The Ohio State University Chapter
The Ohio State University Libraries

Science Café- Father and Son: The Ortons and Their Many Gifts to Science, Ohio State and Beyond

Edward Orton Sr. was Ohio State’s first president, a role he juggled with his first love: Geology. While he ran the daily operations of the then-fledgling University, he also taught and conducted research. His many contributions to the field of Geology included his 18-year role as State Geologist during which he developed the theory of the relationship of gas, oil and brine in subterranean reservoirs. His son, Edward Orton Jr., was no less prolific in his many pursuits, most notably as Ohio State’s first professor of ceramic engineering. Find out more about this father-and-son pair and their many contributions that continue to have an impact today.

About our speaker:

Kevlin C. Haire, Assistant University Archivist

Kevlin Haire has been a staff member of the University Archives since 2006. She holds a Master’s of Library and Information Science degree from Kent State University.

Sponsors: 

Sigma Xi – The Ohio State University Chapter
The Ohio State University Libraries

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