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Tag: GIS (page 1 of 5)

GIS for the Rest of Us (Workshop)

Geographic Information Systems (GIS) has revolutionized our ability to visualize and display information connected to locations. Whether you have used Google’s free tools to find aerial photos of your neighborhood, have searched for a friend’s address using the county auditor’s website, or researched the likelihood of your business flooding during a major storm event, GIS tools are at work. This half-day workshop is designed for:

– Researchers from All Disciplines New to GIS
– K-12 Educators
– Informal Educators
– Members of the Non-Profit Community
– Community Members Who Want to Learn More

A team of instructors will provide an overview of GIS and mapping tools from Google, Esri, and Tableau and showcase examples of how GIS can be used for research and education. Breakout sessions will provide training for various levels of experience. Participants are highly encouraged to bring their own devices.

RSVP at: go.osu.edu/gis-aug9

Direct questions to Josh Sadvari at sadvari.1@osu.edu or 614-292-5828. This program is offered through a partnership between the Byrd Polar and Climate Research Center, the Center for Urban and Regional Analysis, and the University Libraries at The Ohio State University.

GIS for Research II: Essential Skills for GIS Data Management and Visualization (Workshop)

Geographic Information Systems (GIS) are becoming increasingly recognized by researchers across a wide range of disciplines for their use in answering questions, solving problems, and making decisions. Despite the powerful tools and potential benefits associated with GIS, researchers often perceive barriers to entry when it comes to learning new skills in this area, similar to challenges encountered when trying to learn any new software or technology. The aim of this workshop is to lower those barriers for researchers new to GIS by focusing on some of the most common tasks and essential skills for getting started with GIS data management and visualization. In this workshop, participants will:

  • Gain hands-on experience using ArcGIS Desktop, the industry-leading GIS software
  • Learn best practices for describing, preparing, organizing, and managing their GIS data
  • Perform fundamental GIS tasks including acquiring data, projecting data, joining data, and creating map layouts for visualization

The software that will be used during this workshop is available in the Research Commons Computer Lab. Due to the lab’s capacity, this workshop will be limited to 12 participants. Participants do not have to bring their own device.

Who: OSU faculty, staff, and students from all disciplines
When: Thursday, March 8, 2:00 – 5:00 p.m.
Where: Research Commons, 3rd floor of 18th Avenue Library

Join the Waitlist

Use the toggle button to choose your university affiliation (OSU or non-OSU). If you are an OSU affiliate, type in your name.# and click Look Up. Once your information populates, click Submit to confirm your registration. If you are a non-OSU affiliate, enter your information and click Submit to confirm your registration.

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OSU-affiliated


Fields below will be populated using your OSU name.n.

GIS for Research II: Essential Skills for GIS Data Management and Visualization (Workshop)

Geographic Information Systems (GIS) are becoming increasingly recognized by researchers across a wide range of disciplines for their use in answering questions, solving problems, and making decisions. Despite the powerful tools and potential benefits associated with GIS, researchers often perceive barriers to entry when it comes to learning new skills in this area, similar to challenges encountered when trying to learn any new software or technology. The aim of this workshop is to lower those barriers for researchers new to GIS by focusing on some of the most common tasks and essential skills for getting started with GIS data management and visualization. In this workshop, participants will:

  • Gain hands-on experience using ArcGIS Desktop, the industry-leading GIS software
  • Learn best practices for describing, preparing, organizing, and managing their GIS data
  • Perform fundamental GIS tasks including acquiring data, projecting data, joining data, and creating map layouts for visualization

The software that will be used during this workshop is available in the Research Commons Computer Lab. Due to the lab’s capacity, this workshop will be limited to 12 participants. A second session of this workshop is offered on March 8. If you would prefer to register for that session instead, you can do so here: https://library.osu.edu/researchcommons/event/gis-essential-skills2-sp18/.

Who: OSU faculty, staff, and students from all disciplines
When: Friday, February 16, 10:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.
Where: Research Commons, 3rd floor of 18th Avenue Library

Register Here

Use the toggle button to choose your university affiliation (OSU or non-OSU). If you are an OSU affiliate, type in your name.# and click Look Up. Once your information populates, click Submit to confirm your registration. If you are a non-OSU affiliate, enter your information and click Submit to confirm your registration.

* indicates required field

OSU-affiliated


Fields below will be populated using your OSU name.n.

Open and Affordable Tools for Analyzing and Visualizing Data

The tools available to analyze and visualize data have increased in number and decreased in complexity, making them much easier for students to use for course projects. While open source and web-based tools are freely available, many proprietary tools are available through campus or lab software licenses, or in licensed library databases. This session will introduce some of those tools. Inal Elbeyli will discuss the concept of “open source” and the Github repository that makes these tools available. Josh Sadvari will talk about open source and proprietary tools for GIS, and Leigh Bonds will introduce some of the tools available for analyzing text. Lee-Arng Chang will then talk about the capabilities and features of Tableau and Adobe Illustrator, and provide information on where you can download and access these tools on campus.

Register Here

When: Thursday, February 15, 3:00 – 4:00 p.m.
Where: Thompson Library 150A

Love Data Week: Telling Stories with Maps

As Sharon mentioned in her post yesterday, this year’s theme for Love Data Week is Data Stories. One of the topics under that theme is Telling Stories With Data, and there are a whole bunch of apps for that if your goal is to tell stories around geographic data. Esri’s Story Map app templates provide a user-friendly way to combine maps with text, images, and other multimedia content to “harness the power of maps and geography to tell your story.” There’s also a huge gallery of Story Maps submitted by the Esri team and the wider user community that you can explore to see what kinds of stories are being told and find some inspiration for using such a platform to tell your own. I’ll share a few examples below so you can get a better idea of the look and feel of some different Story Map apps.

Prior to joining the OSU Libraries, I was a graduate student studying anthropology, and I remember a Smithsonian Magazine link coming across my desk that included a Story Map (Journal) called Welcome to the Anthropocene. One of the nice things about this example is that it highlights your ability to embed a Story Map in a webpage in addition to being able to share them as standalone apps. Another effective Story Map (Map Series – Tabbed) that I’ve encountered was created by the Esri Story Maps Team following the 10-year anniversary of Hurricane Katrina and made use of a variety of data sources to tell the story of the social and physical changes that took place in New Orleans following that disaster as well as the ongoing recovery.

In addition to these more research-oriented examples, there are good instances of Story Maps being used by government and non-profit organizations to disseminate information more broadly to their communities and the general public. Here’s a good local example of a Story Map (Shortlist) from the City of Westerville that provides updates on the status of development projects and street/sidewalk maintenance programs. I hope that from these few examples, you will have gotten an idea of the potential for using Story Map apps to tell stories with geographic data in an interactive platform that allows for engaging with a wide audience.

Go Westerville Story Map Screenshot

If you are interested in creating your own Story Maps (or web mapping apps with one of the many other configurable templates available), the first step is to get signed up for an ArcGIS Online account using your OSU username and password. The next step is to start doing some hands-on exploring of the various app templates to think about which one might be the best for the story you are trying to tell with your data, and if you have any questions along the way send me an email or schedule a consultation for some assistance.

In tomorrow’s post, you’ll hear more about Data Stories from Lee-Arng Chang, our Data Visualization Specialist so I’ll leave you with one last example that I recently shared with him. The Insights for ArcGIS team recently put together a Story Map (Cascade) called Selecting the Right Data Visualization that highlights the functionality of this template for creating a visually appealing website (even without much of a focus on geographic data in this case).

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