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Tag: Creative Commons (page 1 of 2)

Open Teaching, Learning, and Research: Making Your Scholarship More Affordable and Accessible Through Open Licensing (Workshop)

Join the University Libraries’ Copyright Services to learn more about the benefits and special considerations in making your scholarship and teaching materials openly available through Creative Commons open licenses. This presentation will provide an introduction to the rights provided automatically to authors and creators under copyright law and review important points of copyright ownership under OSU’s IP policy. We will explore the different open license options provided by Creative Commons and discuss how those licenses can be utilized in your teaching and research.

Who: OSU faculty, staff, postdocs, and graduate students
When: Thursday, September 5, 2:00 – 4:00 p.m.
Where: Research Commons, 3rd floor of 18th Avenue Library

Open Teaching, Learning, and Research: Making Your Scholarship More Affordable and Accessible through Open Licensing (Presentation)

During Open Access Week, join the University Libraries’ Copyright Services to learn more about the benefits and special considerations in making your scholarship and teaching materials openly available. This presentation will provide an introduction to the rights provided to authors under copyright law and review important points of OSU’s IP policy. We will explore the different open license options provided by Creative Commons and discuss how those licenses can be utilized in your teaching and research.

Who: OSU faculty, staff, and students from all disciplines
When: Friday, October 26, 1:00 – 3:00 p.m.
Where: Research Commons, 3rd floor of 18th Avenue Library

Love Data Week: Introduction

Purple heart with binary code ones and zeroes inside the outline

Welcome to Love Data Week 2018 (February 12 – February 16)! Love Data Week is intended to raise awareness and celebrate topics surrounding research data management, data sharing, preservation, and reuse. The theme of this year’s Love Data Week is Data Stories.

To celebrate Love Data Week, we are presenting a series of blog posts, starting with this one on the Library of Congress’ Congressional Data Challenge and The Zooniverse, and including future posts on story maps and data visualization.

Library of Congress’ Congressional Data Challenge

The Library of Congress’ Congressional Data Challenge is a project centered on increasing the discovery and use of legislative data collections, particularly with the goal to “create new meaning or tools to help members of Congress and the public explore [data] in new ways.”

This project highlights the publicly available data sets and associated publications available on Congress.gov and encourages participants to think of reusing the data to improve accessibility and usability to create positive products. What data story do you want to tell members of congress and the public?

A great aspect of this project is that the source code of the resulting creations is required to be published and licensed as CC0, which dedicates the work to the public domain and increases access. For more information on what the different Creative Commons licenses mean I would refer you to a great blog post by the OSU Libraries Copyright Services.

The challenge is calling for participants to submit their digital creations (such as visualizations, apps, or websites) by April 2, 2018 and will be offering a first prize of $5,000.00 and a prize of $1,000.00 for the best high-school project.

The Zooniverse

The Zooniverse is the largest platform for “citizen science” where volunteers help researchers collect and analyze data. Projects on the Zooniverse range across the sciences and humanities such as tracking animals associated with the wildebeest migration in the Serengeti, digitizing the archives of the League of Nations, improving space weather forecasts by tracking solar storms, and identifying plastic litter on beaches.

This platform addresses one of the major complications in modern research – technology can collect a very large amount of data quickly but we still need humans to recognize complex patterns which is a time-intensive process. These crowd-sourced data points are combined from many volunteers creating a “wisdom-of-crowds” version and improving machine learning. By calling on many volunteers, the Zooniverse combines technology and people to generate results more quickly than would otherwise be possible.

Anyone can contribute to research on their own timeline and from the convenience of their own device and it is a great platform to keep in mind next time you have a project that might be a good fit, as a teaching tool, or just as a fun place to embrace your inner data lover.

I hope that you all have a great Love Data Week and we hope to see you at some of the upcoming events focused on topics such as finding data, visualizing data, and managing your data! 

Data Drive: Expanding Access to Social Research with ICPSR
Wednesday, February 14, 2:00 – 3:30 p.m.
Learn more and register

Open and Affordable Tools for Analyzing and Visualizing Data
Thursday, February 15, 3:00 – 4:00 p.m.
Learn more and register

GIS for Research II: Essential Skills for GIS Data Management and Visualization
Friday, February 16, 10:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.
Learn more and register

Creating Data Management Plans with the DMPTool
Wednesday, February 21, 3:00 – 4:00 p.m.
Learn more and register

Open Access Week: Open Access Resources

As the 9th International Open Access Week comes to a close, we wanted to leave you with a detailed list of Open Access resources both on campus and beyond.

OSU Open Access Resources

The Knowledge Bank

The Knowledge Bank is OSU’s Institutional Repository. The Knowledge Bank is an Open Access repository that is available for OSU faculty, staff, and students to deposit their research and scholarship. Members of OSU’s community can deposit content such as: articles, monographs, reports, conference proceedings, posters, and, in some cases, supplemental data. The benefits of depositing your research and scholarship in the Knowledge Bank include: worldwide access, increased visibility, a permanent and stable URL, long-term preservation of content, and having your content indexed in major search engines such as Google, Google Scholar, and Bing. To learn more:

The Libraries’ Publishing Program

The Libraries Publishing Program works with faculty, students, and academic units at OSU to publish open access scholarly work in a variety of formats. They exist to fill a need in the OSU community for free or low-cost publication development and hosting, and serve as an alternative to working with a commercial publisher. These publishing services are free to members of the OSU community. As their mission is to provide open access to scholarship, all of the content published must be made freely available online, either immediately or after an embargo period. To learn more:

Copyright Resources Center

The Copyright Resources Center at OSU Libraries supports faculty, staff, and students by providing education and guidance on the application of copyright law to facilitate teaching, research, and scholarship. The Copyright Resources Center can help you understand the rights in your author agreement so that you know how you can share your work and how to use Creative Commons licenses to make your work more open. To learn more:

Other Resources

Open Access Week Website

The Open Access Week website is dedicated to promoting Open Access Week every year and connecting individuals who are passionate about Open Access. The website highlights the different ways that individuals are promoting Open Access across the world, runs an informative blog, and provides access to Open Access promotional resources.

Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC)

SPARC works to enable the open sharing of research outputs and educational materials. Their motivations are to democratize access to knowledge, accelerate discovery, and increase the return on the investments in research and education. SPARC focuses on collaborative partnerships to promote Open Access as the default for research and education.

Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ)

The DOAJ is an online directory that indexes and provides access to peer-reviewed Open Access journals. DOAJ is a great starting point for searches for quality, peer-reviewed open access material. Journals that are indexed by the DOAJ must fill out an application and meet certain criteria related to transparency of journal processes and policies as well as technical best practices and infrastructure.

Open Access Scholarly Publishers Association (OASPA)

OASPA’s mission is to represent the interests of Open Access journal and book publishers globally in all scientific, technical, and scholarly disciplines. Their mission is carried out through exchanging information, setting standards, and promoting Open Access publishers that adhere to best practices in scholarly publishing. OASPA is a great resource when looking for reputable Open Access publishers.

Open Access Directory

The Open Access Directory is a collection of lists and resources about Open Access maintained by the broader Open Access community. The Open Access Directory is a great starting point for anyone who wants to really learn more about Open Access and look into additional resources.

Open Access Overview

This overview of Open Access by Peter Suber is a well-known resource that goes into more detail than our blog post on Tuesday, while still being easy to read. Additionally, this blog post is organized in a way that lets the reader skip around to the sections they might find most relevant to their own Open Access interests.

Open Access Week: Understanding Creative Commons Licenses

One of the many facets of Open Access is open licensing. As mentioned in yesterday’s post covering the basics of open access, the most broad interpretation of Open Access includes content that is free of use restrictions. One of the most common ways for content creators to open up their work is to apply a Creative Commons license that supports the use, sharing, re-purposing, and remixing of the work.

This blog post written by the Copyright Resources Center gives a great overview of Creative Commons licenses and what you need to know as both a creator and a user.

Finally, if you want to learn more about Creative Commons and how this relates to Open Educational Resources there is a workshop being offered this morning in Thompson Library, Room 165 from 10:00 to 11:30 am. You can RSVP by filling out the form at: go.osu.edu/oa-creativecommons.

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