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Tag: Copyright (page 1 of 3)

Publishing: Understanding and Negotiating the Terms of Your Agreement (Workshop)

Join the University Libraries’ Copyright Services for a workshop on strategies and considerations for negotiating terms of your publishing agreement. We will discuss common phrases found in scholarly journal publishing agreements, the implication of those terms for future scholarship and research, and tactics for retaining the rights that are important to you.

In this workshop, participants will have the opportunity to practice negotiating terms using a sample agreement.

Who: Early career researchers
When: Tuesday, October 31, 1:00 – 3:00 p.m.
Where: Research Commons, 3rd floor of 18th Avenue Library

Register Here

Use the toggle button to choose your university affiliation (OSU or non-OSU). If you are an OSU affiliate, type in your name.# and click Look Up. Once your information populates, click Submit to confirm your registration. If you are a non-OSU affiliate, enter your information and click Submit to confirm your registration.

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OSU-affiliated


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Open Access Week: Considerations and Benefits of Open Access Scholarship (Workshop)

Join the University Libraries and the Health Sciences Library for a workshop focused on the theme of this year’s International Open Access Week: “Open in Order to _______________________.” Open in order to: raise the visibility of your research; increase the impact of your scholarship; and increase access to knowledge. 

This workshop will cover the basics of copyright and Open Access, including understanding your rights as an author, sharing your research to a broader audience, publishing in Open Access journals, and funding models and support. Participants will also be invited to explore topics of interest in small facilitated group discussions. 

Who: OSU faculty, staff, and students from all disciplines
When: Thursday, October 26, 3:00 – 5:00 p.m.
Where: Research Commons, 3rd floor of 18th Avenue Library

Register Here

Use the toggle button to choose your university affiliation (OSU or non-OSU). If you are an OSU affiliate, type in your name.# and click Look Up. Once your information populates, click Submit to confirm your registration. If you are a non-OSU affiliate, enter your information and click Submit to confirm your registration.

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OSU-affiliated


Fields below will be populated using your OSU name.n.

Open Access Week: Copyright Trivia (Workshop)

Do you have what it takes to be crowned Copyright Champion? Join the University Libraries’ Copyright Services for a short introduction to copyright workshop, where you will learn the many important ways copyright law interacts with your daily academic life. Then test your copyright knowledge and compete for glory and prizes in the Copyright Trivia Championships! This event is in celebration of International Open Access Week

Who: OSU faculty, staff, and students from all disciplines
When: Monday, October 23, 3:00 – 5:00 p.m.
Where: Research Commons, 3rd floor of 18th Avenue Library

Register Here

Use the toggle button to choose your university affiliation (OSU or non-OSU). If you are an OSU affiliate, type in your name.# and click Look Up. Once your information populates, click Submit to confirm your registration. If you are a non-OSU affiliate, enter your information and click Submit to confirm your registration.

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OSU-affiliated


Fields below will be populated using your OSU name.n.

A Fair Use Week Interview with John Muir

We are excited to share this guest post from our partners at the Copyright Resources Center, written by Marley Nelson, Rights Management Specialist. 

At the Copyright Resources Center, our job is to help members of the Ohio State community understand copyright law and how it affects their work. This week, we are focusing on Fair Use- because it is Fair Use Week! If you’d like an introduction to Fair Use Week, check out our earlier blog post for a quick rundown of Fair Use and why we spend an entire week celebrating it.

For Fair Use Week 2017, we wanted to educate ourselves on how Fair Use affects some of our closest clients. In particular, I spoke with John Muir, a veteran Instructional Designer (ID) who helps design awardwinning online courses for The Ohio State University. He has almost a decade of experience designing online courses, with the last four years spent in the Office of Distance Education and eLearning at OSU. As an ID, John not only counsels faculty on designing online educational experiences, but also assists them with populating those online classrooms with content. It is the content piece that has John in frequent communications with the Copyright Resources Center. John sat down with me to talk about how Fair Use impacts his work as an Instructional Designer.

John was first introduced to copyright, as it applied to his work with online content, by the Napster file-sharing litigation. He said it highlighted, and helped to dispel, the common myth that works on the internet are “just there for the taking”. By the time he came to OSU, John says he had “an awareness of copyright”, but it wasn’t until specific questions started popping up that Fair Use came into the picture. His biggest takeaway from learning about Fair Use is that “copyright is not black and white”. Now, when working with faculty to design courses, John can help faculty members fully assess the copyright situation. Instead of asking whether their use is okay under the exception, John works with faculty to reframe their expectations of Fair Use.

He says this reframing is particularly helpful because copyright can seem particularly scary on the internet, which can be “a place of vulnerability”. When working with faculty transitioning from in-person to online teaching, Fair Use is a way to get faculty to understand that copyright is contextual and not a binary, black and white issue. By reframing copyright through the lends of Fair Use, John finds that it can give faculty more freedom to evaluate their course materials and make choices. It takes copyright out of the often foreign realm of “the law” and places it into the contexts of intellectual creativity and respect for other scholars. These more familiar contexts allow faculty to feel a greater ownership of the decisions they make with their online courses. The change of context can also help faculty be more creative and lead to a “richness of materials in the course”.

The issue with Fair Use is that the benefits only accrue if faculty are willing to buy in. Fair Use, despite its usefulness as a copyright exception and a tool to inspire ownership and creativity, can feel unwieldy. This is particularly true for individuals unfamiliar with its use. In John’s experience, many faculty don’t like working with the Fair Use exception, because it doesn’t provide a clear and easy answer. They may prefer to work towards an ability to claim an exception under the TEACH Act. However, with a proper introduction to the benefits of Fair Use, many faculty enjoy using it because it can give them wider discretion in choosing materials for their course. It also gives them more control in decision-making regarding course content.

I learned a lot discussing Fair Use with John. I was particularly struck by his innovative interpretation of Fair Use as a teaching tool. While the importance of Fair Use as an exception to copyright was mentioned, that was not its most important function. As a teaching tool, Fair Use has helped John highlight some of the philosophical underpinnings of copyright an deliver a greater overall understanding of its importance, both to American culture and to our work here at The Ohio State University.

To learn more about the Copyright Resources Center, check out their Copyright Corner Blog: https://library.osu.edu/blogs/copyright/

Fair Use Week 2017

We are happy to share this guest post from our partners at the Copyright Resources Center, written by Marley Nelson, Rights Management Specialist.

In the United States, copyright law grants a limited monopoly to the owner of a copyright. While that limited monopoly is in effect, others may not utilize any of the six exclusive rights of a copyright owner. Unless, of course, they have permission from the copyright owner or they can rely on an exception. Fair use is just such an exception.

A popular common law defense for over 100  years, fair use was codified in the Copyright Act of 1976. While some criticize fair use for being too vague, that same flexibility gives the exception the ability to cover many types of works in many contexts. In fact, proponents of fair use are so enamored of it that they host an entire week of events to celebrate it and educate the public on its use.

Fair Use/Fair Dealing Week 2017 is February 20th – 24th. At The Ohio State University, we’ll be celebrating with blog posts, Tweets, and a workshop at the Research Commons on Tuesday, February 21st, all focused on fair use. In addition, the Association of Research Libraries keeps a running list of all Fair Use Week events, which can be viewed at http://fairuseweek.org/.

The first piece in The Ohio State University’s celebration of Fair Use Week is this blog post. It gathers almost all of our previous posts regarding fair use into one place, creating a wonderful primer on fair use news and updates over the past several years. Stay tuned later in the week for a second blog post highlighting how Senior Instructional Designer John Muir has utilized fair use in his work with faculty.

We invite you to browse our collection of fair use blog posts and follow us on Twitter for more fair use events and information (@OSUCopyright).

Fair Use 101: What is Fair Use?

A great introduction to fair use and how it can benefit you.

 

Fair Use 101: Why do we need Fair Use?

If you are already familiar with fair use and want to take a deeper dive, this post highlights some of the policy reasons behind why we have fair use.

 

George State, A Brief Overview

Overview of Cambridge University Press, et al v. Becker, et al – an important case on the applicability of fair use in the practice of e-reserves.

 

Fair use toolkit for librarians

If you are a librarian interested in fair use, this is the post for you. A treasure trove of links to helpful resources, along with a brief overview of ways that fair use can impact libraries.

 

Fair use best practices to the rescue!

Because of the flexibility of fair use, it can be difficult to determine when one is eligible for a fair use defense. Best practices can help alleviate some of that confusion, and in this post we discuss how best practices interact with fair use, and link to some popular best practices guidelines.

 

Fair Use in Digital Storytelling

Authors of digital stores remix and reuse materials to create something new: a short video with a personal narrative. Learn how fair use intersects and interacts with remixing and the creation of new art.

 

Google Launches YouTube Fair Use Protection Program

A program launched by Google promises to provide legal support for a select group of videos, determined by Google to represent “some of the best examples of fair use”.

To learn more about the Copyright Resources Center, check out their Copyright Corner Blog: https://library.osu.edu/blogs/copyright/

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