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Tag: Altmetrics

NISO Virtual Conference on Advancing Altmetrics: Best Practices and Emerging Ideas (Webinar)

This webinar will address issues surrounding the use of alternative metrics to gauge research impact, including disciplinary differences in the definition and use of altmetrics, use of cases in the university setting, application to data, responsible use of altmetrics, and long term impact on the research process and administrative decision-making. 

A full schedule and roster of speakers is available here.

Who: OSU faculty, postdocs, and early career researchers
When: Wednesday, December 13, 11:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Where: Research Commons, 3rd floor of 18th Avenue Library

Register Here

Use the toggle button to choose your university affiliation (OSU or non-OSU). If you are an OSU affiliate, type in your name.# and click Look Up. Once your information populates, click Submit to confirm your registration. If you are a non-OSU affiliate, enter your information and click Submit to confirm your registration.

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Tracking and Enhancing Your Research Impact (Workshop)

Measuring your impact is an important step in the research process, especially for applying for positions, for promotion and tenure, and for grant funding. This may include traditional factors such as citation counts and journal reputation and new measures that look at the reach and visibility of the work through downloads, saves, and views, as well as mentions in blogs and other social media. This introductory workshop will provide an overview of the following topics:

  • Establishing your author identity using ORCID and researcher IDs
  • Understanding and tracking common metrics such as journal impact factors, h-index, and times cited
  • Understanding and tracking altmetrics (alternative metrics) such as views, downloads, and mentions in online media
  • Enhancing your impact through journal choice and open access, and promoting your work via researcher profiles and online media

Participants are encouraged to bring their own laptop or tablet for hands-on participation.

Who: OSU graduate students and early career researchers
When: Wednesday, October 4, 1:00 – 2:00 p.m.
Where: Research Commons, 3rd floor of 18th Avenue Library

Register Here

Use the toggle button to choose your university affiliation (OSU or non-OSU). If you are an OSU affiliate, type in your name.# and click Look Up. Once your information populates, click Submit to confirm your registration. If you are a non-OSU affiliate, enter your information and click Submit to confirm your registration.

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OSU-affiliated


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Increasing Impact One Tweet at a Time

In a recent post, the news team for the leading journal Science took a look at the top 50 science stars of Twitter. The inspiration for this story was the amusing proposal by genomicist Neil Hall for the “Kardashian Index” (or K-index) – a comparison of a scientist’s popularity on Twitter to their impact through traditional citation metrics – named after the reality TV star Kim Kardashian.

Hall’s good-humored suggestion in proposing the K-index was that scientists should take note of discrepancies that might exist between their popular profiles and publication records so that they can identify when “it’s time to get off Twitter and write those papers.”

So, why would a serious researcher ever consider taking the plunge to become a bona fide member of the Twitter community?

In her article, Science writer Jia You notes from speaking with researchers that the social media platform can offer a number of benefits. First, most of the “Science Kardashians” that make up the top 50, many of whom will be instantly recognizable, devote the vast majority of their tweets to communicating science in a way that is more accessible to the public than the academic journal article. Beyond its use as a medium for public outreach, Twitter provides an informal way for researchers to be reviewed by and increase engagement with their peers, by tweeting presentations and papers to followers, gauging reactions, and addressing criticisms. Furthermore, researchers on Twitter can use it both as an outlet for staying up-to-date with the work of others and also for spreading the latest news about their own projects to attract greater attention to their work.

Twitter, then, is one of many social media venues for demonstrating a commitment to public outreach, engaging with peers in the research community, and promoting one’s own work. It will never replace the impact that researchers can make by publishing in peer-reviewed journals, nor should it. Rather, it provides a way of expanding that impact through an alternative platform that ultimately reaches a wider, more diverse audience.

The dynamic landscape of research communication is reflected in the fact that impact is now not only measurable through traditional citation metrics but also through a growing body of alternative metrics, or altmetrics, that take into account a researcher’s contributions via posts on websites, social media, and elsewhere. Check out our Measuring your Impact page to learn more about evaluating and increasing research impact through both traditional and alternative metrics.

And before you know it, you might be calculating your own Kardashian Index!