Faculty Forum Series Lectures

Soundmapping Religion in the Midwest (Feb. 18, 2016)

What does religion in the Midwest sound like? How might we understand it differently if we begin by listening for it? These questions animate the Religious Sound Map Project, which will invite multiple public audiences to experience the religious diversity of the Midwest through sound. In this Faculty Forum Series presentation, Prof. Isaac Weiner (Comparative Studies) will introduce this new digital project by reflecting on some of the possibilities and limits of religious soundmapping.

Reframing Public Housing: Visualization and Data Analytics in History (Mar. 2, 2016)

An array of scholars have long concluded that America’s experiment with public housing was an unmitigated failure. If we look to the case of Chicago and the reporting of the problems with public housing in the Chicago Tribune, it might be easy to come to that conclusion. A collaborative research project between Patrick Potyondy (History), David Staley (History), and Terry Reese (OSU Libraries) challenges this received wisdom. By employing sentiment analysis on nine major historically-black newspapers, a different picture of the efficacy of public housing emerges, a picture that comes into focus when we employ new techniques of data analytics and visualization.

The Thrills of Interdisciplinary Research Teamwork (Apr. 19, 2016)

Join us for a reflection on the development and implementation of interdisciplinary team building and research.  Maurice Stevens (Comparative Studies), Tracie McCambridge (Wexner Center for the Arts), and Amanda Rinehart (OSU Libraries), will discuss their experiences convening a group of diverse researchers, community partners, and participants to consider the complex social meanings and realities faced by people living with brain/mind injury and their family systems.

Workshops

Grant Writing: An Introduction (Jan. 21, 2016)

Join us for this interactive workshop on grant writing. We will address some of the similarities and differences between the funding processes for federal/state agencies and private foundations. Topics include best practices for seeking funding, including the SPIN Funding Opportunities system and other funding resources, and examples of writing that is both persuasive and clear. Presenters include:

  • Dinessa Solomon, Executive Director, Foundation Relations
  • Jeff Agnoli, Office of Research
  • Amanda Rinehart, Data Management Services Librarian

Strategies for Writing a Successful Abstract (Jan. 27, 2016)

Are you interested in presenting your research at a poster forum or conference? During this session, you will learn from a faculty member about strategies for writing a research abstract in any field and develop the skills to compose a strong abstract. Representatives from the Undergraduate Research Office will also provide a brief overview of the guidelines for applying to present at the Denman Forum and the Spring Expo.

Grants for Graduate Students: How to Successfully Apply for a CGS Grant (Jan. 28, 2016)

Are you a graduate student interested in research, conference travel, and professional development grants available to you through the Council of Graduate Students (CGS)? Want to know how to push your CGS grant application over the top? Join us to learn the ins and outs of applying for the Global Gateway Grant, Ray Travel Award, Career Development Grant, and Hayes Research Forum.

Finding Funding: STEM and Ag Research (Feb. 2, 2016)

Want to learn strategies for finding funding opportunities and creating custom funding alerts relevant to your research? Join Jeff Agnoli and Margo Nash of the Office of Research for this interactive workshop, where you will learn more about using the SPIN funding opportunities database and accessing other funding and grant writing resources available to researchers at Ohio State. This session will focus on research funding opportunities in STEM and Ag disciplines.

IRB Training for Undergraduates (Feb. 9, 2016)

Are you interested in working with human subjects or their data in your research? Do you need IRB approval? Not sure? Doing research that involves human subjects, especially in the Social and Behavioral Sciences and allied fields, requires prior approval from an Institutional Review Board (IRB). Join the Office of Responsible Research Practices and the Undergraduate Research Office to learn about the approval process, and know the rules before you start!

Lab Etiquette for the Beginning Researcher (Feb. 11, 2016)

When student researchers join a laboratory, they are walking into a new environment that has more rules than a typical workspace. Some rules will become obvious very rapidly, but many are not explicitly written anywhere. Figuring out the rules and knowing good lab etiquette is essential for success. In this session, Dr. Marcela Hernandez will go over some basic lab etiquette rules and provide tips on how to figure out the laboratory’s unique culture and expectations. This program is sponsored by the Undergraduate Research Office.

Guidelines for Keeping a Good Lab Notebook (Feb. 17, 2016)

Keeping good records of your research is crucial to a successful project in any field of study. Many student researchers are working in laboratories, where they are asked to keep a lab notebook. This session will teach you how to maintain and organize your lab notebook to keep track of protocols, experiments, and results. Join Dr. Marcela Hernandez to learn the secrets to a great lab notebook, whether you are currently working in a research lab or interested in joining one! This program is sponsored by the Undergraduate Research Office.

Grant Writing: An Introduction (Feb. 23, 2016)

Join us for this interactive workshop on grant writing. We will address some of the similarities and differences between the funding processes for federal/state agencies and private foundations. Topics include best practices for seeking funding, including the SPIN Funding Opportunities system and other funding resources, and examples of writing that is both persuasive and clear. Presenters include:

  • Dinessa Solomon, Executive Director, Foundation Relations
  • Jeff Agnoli, Office of Research
  • Amanda Rinehart, Data Management Services Librarian

Fair Use in Research and Education (Feb. 24, 2016)

Do you use copyrighted materials from third party sources in your teaching or research publications? Have you heard that all educational use is fair use but have some concerns about whether this is accurate? How can you evaluate whether something may qualify as fair use or determine if you need to seek permission? Join the Copyright Resources Center during Fair Use Week to learn how to use copyrighted material confidently and legally in your research publications and teaching.

Preparing and Presenting Research Posters: STEM (Feb. 24, 2016)

Getting ready to present your research at a poster forum or conference? Looking for tips on how to create an eye-catching and informative research poster? Hear from a faculty member about what they look for in a research poster, and see a mock presentation from a prior Denman participant. This session is focused on research posters in STEM fields, but researchers from all disciplines are welcome to attend! This program is sponsored by the Undergraduate Research Office.

Zotero Basics: Citation Management Training (Feb. 25, 2016)

Are you interested in using citation management software for your next writing project but not sure where to start? Want to learn more about how citation management software can make your life easier when it comes to collecting, organizing, and citing published works? Join the Libraries’ Research Services for an overview of how you can use Zotero to organize your references, create bibliographies, and more as you prepare for your next paper or publication.

“The Write Stuff”: Navigating the Changing Landscape of Scholarly Publishing (Mar. 3, 2016)

Navigating today’s publishing landscape can raise many questions for researchers: What do I need to know before signing a publishing agreement? How should I evaluate digital, open access, and new model publications? How will I meet funding agency requirements for sharing my work? This workshop will offer answers to these questions and more! Whether you’re getting ready to publish your first journal article or are an experienced author looking to understand how publishing is changing, there is something in this session for you! Presenters include:

  • Sandra Enimil, Head of the Copyright Resources Center, University Libraries
  • Lynda Hartel, Associate Director, Knowledge Integration, Health Sciences Library
  • Melanie Schlosser, Digital Publishing Librarian, University Libraries
  • Maureen Walsh, Institutional Repository Services Librarian, University Libraries

Finding Funding: Biomedical Research (Mar. 9, 2016)

Want to learn strategies for finding funding opportunities and creating custom funding alerts relevant to your research? Join Jeff Agnoli and Margo Nash of the Office of Research for this interactive workshop, where you will learn more about using the SPIN funding opportunities database and accessing other funding and grant writing resources available to researchers at Ohio State. This session will focus on research funding opportunities in biomedical fields.

Preparing and Presenting Research Posters: Arts, Humanities, and Social & Behavioral Sciences (Mar. 10, 2016)

Getting ready to present your research at a poster forum or conference? Looking for tips on how to create an eye-catching and informative research poster? Hear from a faculty member about what they look for in a research poster, and see a mock presentation from a prior Denman participant. This session is focused on research posters in the arts, humanities, and social & behavioral sciences, but researchers from all disciplines are welcome to attend! This program is sponsored by the Undergraduate Research Office.

Data Management Plans: Biomedical Research (Mar. 22, 2016)

Many funding agencies now require the submission of a data management plan along with a researcher’s grant proposal. In this session, we will discuss the information that researchers should be including in their data management plans. Participants will also learn strategies for creating data management plans with the online DMPTool, which walks researchers through a funding agency’s specific requirements and expectations. Join Amanda Rinehart, OSU’s Data Management Services Librarian, for this hands-on workshop. This session will focus on creating data management plans in biomedical fields.

Preparing and Presenting Research Posters: General (Mar. 23, 2016)

Getting ready to present your research at a poster forum or conference? Looking for tips on how to create an eye-catching and informative research poster? Hear from a faculty member about what they look for in a research poster, and see a mock presentation from a prior Denman participant. This is a general poster workshop, and researchers from all disciplines are welcome to attend! This program is sponsored by the Undergraduate Research Office.

Getting Your Article Published: Tips for Sharing Your Research (Mar. 29, 2016)

Looking for tips on navigating the peer review process? Wondering how to avoid some of the most common reasons for an article to be rejected? Join Melanie Schlosser, OSU’s Digital Publishing Librarian, for advice about sharing your research in scholarly journals and getting your next article published.

Waivers of Informed Consent and HIPAA Research Authorization (Mar. 30, 2016)

The Office of Responsible Research Practices is offering a workshop covering the regulatory requirements for informed consent and HIPAA research authorization and possible exceptions to those requirements through waivers. IRB review considerations, applicable federal regulations, and Ohio State Human Research Protection Program policies will also be discussed. Anyone involved in preparing Social and Behavioral Sciences IRB submissions is invited to attend.

Finding Funding: Social Sciences and Humanities Research (Apr. 14, 2016)

Want to learn strategies for finding funding opportunities and creating custom funding alerts relevant to your research? Join Jeff Agnoli and Margo Nash of the Office of Research for this interactive workshop, where you will learn more about using the SPIN funding opportunities database and accessing other funding and grant writing resources available to researchers at Ohio State. This session will focus on research funding opportunities in social sciences and humanities disciplines.

Data Management Plans: Social Sciences and Humanities Research (Apr. 21, 2016)

Many funding agencies now require the submission of a data management plan along with a researcher’s grant proposal. In this session, we will discuss the information that researchers should be including in their data management plans. Participants will also learn strategies for creating data management plans with the online DMPTool, which walks researchers through a funding agency’s specific requirements and expectations. Join Amanda Rinehart, OSU’s Data Management Services Librarian, for this hands-on workshop. This session will focus on creating data management plans in social sciences and humanities disciplines.

Panel Discussions

Spilling the Beans: Secrets to Summer Research (Jan. 19, 2016)

Summer is a great time to devote to undergraduate research! Hear student panelists in various fields speak about their experiences conducting full-time summer research projects throughout the country, and find out how you can do the same! This program is sponsored by the Undergraduate Research Office.

Predatory Publishing, Solicitation Scams, and Unethical Publishing Practices (Apr. 7, 2016)

Join us for an informal presentation and discussion about the alarming increase of predatory publishing and other scams. This session will focus on the quality and integrity of the publishing process, responsible editorial policies, transparency & ethical manuscript review, and things authors should look out for when assessing a journal. Presenters will share resources on both the potentials and pitfalls of open access publishing and where to go for additional information when it comes time to publish your research. This session is open to all members of the university community, i.e., faculty, postdocs, and graduate students. Learn more about this topic.

Dr. Holly J. Falk-Krzesinski’s visit is being coordinated by the Center for Applied Plant Sciences (CAPS), University Research Committee of the Faculty Senate, Office of Research, and University Libraries.

Panelists include:

  • Holly J. Falk-Krzesinski, PhD, Vice President. Strategic Alliances | Global Academic Relations | Elsevier
  • Melanie Schlosser, Digital Publishing Librarian, Associate Professor, Collection & Technical Services, University Libraries
  • Jennifer Yucel, PhD, Research Integrity Officer & Director, Office of Research Compliance
  • Caroline Wagner, PhD, Chair, University Senate Research Committee, Wolf Chair in International Affairs, John Glenn College of Public Affairs
  • Vladimir Kogan, PhD, Assistant Professor, Political Science, College of Arts & Sciences
  • Jan Neiger, PhD, Assistant Vice Provost, Office of Academic Affairs

Discussion Forums

Mobile Coffee: The Humanities and the Arts Discovery Theme (Feb. 25, 2016)

Join us for coffee and conversation to connect with colleagues in the university community and beyond.

The Humanities and the Arts Discovery Theme will co-host an ongoing Mobile Coffee series to foster dialogues on national topics in higher education and the liberal arts. The Coffees highlight new scholarly and creative projects, resources, and opportunities and provide a forum for discussing the ongoing impact and value of the humanities and arts.

The Mobile Coffee Series is free and open to all faculty, staff and students and to the public. The topic for the February 25th Mobile Coffee is Digital Scholarship and Data in the Arts and Humanities.

Suggested Readings:

The Humanities, Done Digitally: http://chronicle.com/article/The-Humanities-Done-Digitally/127382/

A Short Guide to the Digital_Humanities: http://jeffreyschnapp.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/D_H_ShortGuide.pdf

Big? Smart? Clean? Messy? Data in the Humanities: http://journalofdigitalhumanities.org/2-3/big-smart-clean-messy-data-in-the-humanities/