Research Commons Presents

Bridging the Gap: Our Experience with Outreach Educational Activities as a Way to Expand Social Perspective (Sep. 27, 2018)

In the current worldwide political scenario, the perception individuals have of human diversity and cultural variation play an important role in shaping events on local, regional, national and international scales. Intolerance in particular plagues communities around the world, including our own. Much of this intolerance is ultimately the result of people not being able to properly contextualize human diversity, and therefore not being able to accept and incorporate the perspectives of others. The value in diversity is lost. This presentation tackles issues surrounding intolerance by discussing the role that outreach programs can play in broadening people’s perspectives and thereby, reducing different types of biases. Through a series of activities we created at the Department of Anthropology, with the participation of undergraduate, graduate and faculty volunteers, we are engaging in the development of interactive educational opportunities that explore the larger human biocultural context. Join us for this talk so we can share our experience and discuss our initiatives with educators, students, and researchers from different backgrounds.

A Zero Hunger World: Data Resources for Improving Food Access, Health, and Well-Being (Oct. 16, 2018)

The world produces enough food to feed everyone, but 815 million people still suffer from hunger. In Ohio, 14.8% of households, and 1 in 5 children, experience low food security, meaning they lack reliable access to a sufficient quantity of affordable, nutritious food. Whether you are a working professional, farmer, student or simply someone that is willing to make a change, you can take action for #ZeroHunger! Join us on World Food Day to raise awareness for food security challenges in our community, and learn more about utilizing the libraries as one of the resources that people can draw upon in seeking solutions.

GIS Day 2018 (Nov. 14, 2018)

GIS Day at Ohio State is an annual event for students, staff, faculty, and visitors to learn more about geographic information systems (GIS) and celebrate the power of geospatial analysis and visualization in answering research questions and solving real-world problems. GIS Day 2018 will include:

Two Humanitarian Map-a-Thons
Join us for a short training session on OpenStreetMap and the HOT Tasking Manager, and then dive into mapping features to assist communities, organizations, and governments across the world in addressing local development challenges and aiding in disaster response. Bring your own device (i.e., laptop) to fully participate in the map-a-thon. No prior experience with OpenStreetMap is necessary, and all new mappers are welcome!

Lightning Talks
Learn about the application of geospatial technologies across a wide variety of disciplines from OSU faculty, staff, and students, as well as local GIS professionals. Refreshments will be provided. Click here to see the list of presentation topics and speakers.

Exhibits and Resource Fair
Explore map collections housed in the OSU Libraries along with GIS resources available across campus and beyond. GIS professionals will be happy to talk with students about careers in GIS and the applications of geospatial technologies in real-world scenarios.

Researching The Stowaway: Telling the Tale of An Expedition to Antarctica (Nov. 15, 2018)

In 2013, author and journalist Laurie Gwen Shapiro began researching the story of William “Billy” Gawronski, a young New Yorker who managed to stowaway on Admiral Richard E. Byrd’s first expedition to Antarctica.  Shapiro had nearly completed her research—including her own expedition to Antarctica!—when she discovered that Admiral Byrd’s papers were held at The Ohio State University in The Byrd Polar and Climate Research Center Archives.  Shapiro made the unexpected trip from New York City to Columbus to complete the research she needed to publish her first full-length work of nonfiction.

Join Shapiro in the Research Commons, as she discusses her research process—from discovering the story of Billy Gawronski to researching in the Polar Archives, to turning that research into a published work of nonfiction.

About the author:

Laurie Gwen Shapiro is an award-winning documentary filmmaker and journalist whose writing has appeared in New YorkSlateAeonThe Forward, and the Los Angeles Review of BooksThe Stowaway is her first full-length work of nonfiction.

Workshops and Events

Corporate Research Engagement 101 (Sep. 5, 2018)

Many factors are driving an increase in engagement between universities and industry; including increased competition for redirected and/or declining governmental research investments and the creation of products and markets that require a workforce with new skills. As University researchers navigate these dynamics it is important to understand the extent to which successful relationships are dependent on an understanding of corporate decision making, the ability to manage expectations, and taking a holistic approach to finding win-win value propositions on the industry/university engagement continuum. Strategic partnerships in this domain merge the discovery-driven culture of the university with the innovation-driven environment of the company. To make the chemistry work, each side must overcome the cultural and communications differences that often impair industry/university partnerships of all types and undercut their potential. This seminar led by the Industry Liaison Office addresses the industry-university opportunities by providing researchers with a fundamental understanding of the value of industry engagement and the engagement continuum, tools for rapidly vetting and solidifying industrial opportunities, and knowledge of the support resources at OSU that are key to helping secure and nurture industrial relationships

IRB Training for Graduate Students (Sep. 5, 2018)

The Office of Responsible Research Practices is offering a workshop for graduate students on how to navigate the Institutional Review Board (IRB) process. The workshop will focus on the following key topics:

– Understanding why we have an IRB process
– Exploring types of research and levels of review
– Reviewing application components
– Tips for successful application completion
– Finding out where to go for help
– Q&A

GIS for Research I: An Introduction to GIS Concepts and Data (Sep. 6, 2018)

Geographic Information Systems (GIS) can be a powerful research tool for solving problems in and across a wide range of disciplines. If your research question has a geographic component, GIS data and tools can be integral to informing your analysis and communicating spatial patterns to your audience. In this workshop, participants will:

  • Be introduced to key concepts for using GIS in research
  • Learn more about common GIS data formats
  • Explore OSU Libraries’ and public databases where GIS data can be retrieved
Introduction to Data Visualization (Sep. 12, 2018)

Data visualization (or data viz for short) has rapidly developed into a huge area of interest for a broad group of users including researchers, businesses, and anyone looking to effectively communicate a large amount of information to a specific audience. If you have a research question that utilizes data, data visualization and its associated tools can help you analyze and make sense of the information you have gathered. In this presentation, participants will:

  • Be introduced to what data visualization is and why it is both an important and relevant skill to learn in this day and age.
  • Learn more about the types of data visualizations available to choose from and reasons for using specific types of visualizations.
  • Take a look at some resources available for learning more about different types of data visualizations and how to create them.
  • Explore some of the tools used to create data visualizations in a variety of fields.
  • Watch a video showcasing what a great visualization and presentation can look like.
  • Gain some useful tips on how to better design your next visualization.
  • Find out what the Ohio State University Libraries has to offer in terms of data visualization support.
GIS for Research II: Essential Skills for GIS Data Management and Visualization (Sep. 20, 2018)

Geographic Information Systems (GIS) are becoming increasingly recognized by researchers across a wide range of disciplines for their use in answering questions, solving problems, and making decisions. Despite the powerful tools and potential benefits associated with GIS, researchers often perceive barriers to entry when it comes to learning new skills in this area, similar to challenges encountered when trying to learn any new software or technology. The aim of this workshop is to lower those barriers for researchers new to GIS by focusing on some of the most common tasks and essential skills for getting started with GIS data management and visualization. In this workshop, participants will:

  • Gain hands-on experience using ArcGIS Desktop, the industry-leading GIS software
  • Learn best practices for describing, preparing, organizing, and managing their GIS data
  • Perform fundamental GIS tasks including acquiring data, projecting data, joining data, and creating map layouts for visualization
Finding Funding: SPIN (Sep. 25, 2018)

Want to learn strategies for finding funding opportunities and creating custom funding alerts relevant to your research? Join Jeff Agnoli from the Office of Research for this interactive workshop, where you will learn more about using the SPIN funding opportunities database and accessing other funding and grant writing resources available to researchers at Ohio State. 

Digital Projects: Getting Started (Sep. 25, 2018)

When it comes to getting a digital research project underway, “knowledge is power”. In this presentation for humanities and arts researchers, Dr. Leigh Bonds discusses the process of getting a digital project started- from project scoping to determining the best platform or tool, from managing digital content to developing a proof of concept.

Introduction to Developing a Proposal Win Strategy- Part One (Sep. 26, 2018)

This session introduces the concept of developing a proposal win strategy for a specific funding opportunity prior to the solicitation release. You will learn how strategy development fits into the proposal and project lifecycle and how this approach leads to differentiating your proposal from your competitors. This introductory session is open to anyone interested in learning about the proposal development process. We recommend that participants attend this introductory session before registering for the subsequent hands-on workshop on how to develop a proposal win strategy.

Introduction to Excel for Data Visualization (Sep. 27, 2018)

Microsoft Excel is a basic, but powerful spreadsheet program that is often used as the starting point for data visualization because of its ease of use. Using data in a table format allows for an organized way of entering your data, cleaning, processing, and analyzing it, and even visualizing it. While there may be other, more specialized data analysis and statistical tools available, Excel provides a basic foundation for visualizing data that then can be refined in other programs such as Adobe Illustrator or imported into more visualization- focused tools like Tableau. In this workshop, participants will:

  • Learn about the interface of Excel and the power of spreadsheets for organizing and manipulating data.
  • Explore the variety of data visualizations that you can create with Excel’s graphical tools.
  • Customize your visualization with the appropriate legend, labels, title, colors, and other adjustments.
  • Learn how to save and export visualizations for printing or further editing in other programs such as Adobe Illustrator.
Making Your Science Accessible (Sep. 28, 2018)

This introductory workshop is designed specifically for researchers, scientists, data analysts and others who want to share their research succinctly with their audiences. Topics included are:

  • Identifying the level of your audiences’ knowledge.
  • Building context.
  • Laddering complex ideas for clearer understanding.
  • Showcasing what is possible.

This event is sponsored by the University LibrariesOffice of ResearchDiscovery Themes, and the STEAM Factory.

Tracking and Enhancing Your Research Impact (Oct. 2, 2018)

Measuring your impact is an important step in the research process, especially for applying for positions, for promotion and tenure, and for grant funding. This may include traditional factors such as citation counts and journal reputation, and new measures that look at the reach and visibility of the work through downloads, saves, and views, as well as mentions in blogs and other social media. This introductory workshop will provide an overview of the following topics:

  • Establishing your author identity using ORCID and researcher IDs.
  • Understanding and tracking common metrics such as journal impact, factors, h-index, and times cited.
  • Understanding and tracking altmetrics (alternative metrics) such as views, downloads, and mentions in online media.
  • Enhancing your impact through journal choice and open access, and promoting your work via research profiles and online media.
Web Mapping Basics with ArcGIS Online (Oct. 4, 2018)

Want to make a map for your research, teaching, outreach, or just for fun? ArcGIS Online (AGOL) is the premier platform for easily and efficiently creating interactive web mapping applications. In this workshop, participants will:

  • Sign-up for access to ArcGIS Online using their OSU username and password
  • Learn the basics of making web maps with ArcGIS Online, including adding layers to a map, changing layer styles, and configuring pop-ups
  • Be introduced to spatial analysis and visualization techniques based on a real-world scenario

This workshop is offered through a collaboration between the Center for Urban and Regional Analysis and the University Libraries.

Corporate Research Engagement 101 (Oct. 5, 2018)

Many factors are driving an increase in engagement between universities and industry; including increased competition for redirected and/or declining governmental research investments and the creation of products and markets that require a workforce with new skills. As University researchers navigate these dynamics it is important to understand the extent to which successful relationships are dependent on an understanding of corporate decision making, the ability to manage expectations, and taking a holistic approach to finding win-win value propositions on the industry/university engagement continuum. Strategic partnerships in this domain merge the discovery-driven culture of the university with the innovation-driven environment of the company. To make the chemistry work, each side must overcome the cultural and communications differences that often impair industry/university partnerships of all types and undercut their potential. This seminar led by the Industry Liaison Office addresses the industry-university opportunities by providing researchers with a fundamental understanding of the value of industry engagement and the engagement continuum, tools for rapidly vetting and solidifying industrial opportunities, and knowledge of the support resources at OSU that are key to helping secure and nurture industrial relationships

Citation Tracking and Research Metrics Working Session (Oct. 11, 2018)

These small group hands-on sessions will focus on tracking citations to your work and gathering research metrics such as h-index, journal impact factors, and alternative metrics.  After a brief overview of the available tools (e.g. Web of Science, Scopus, Journal Citation Reports, Altmetric, etc.) the bulk of the time will available for participants to gather their own information, ask questions, and receive individualized assistance.  

Creating Figures and Diagrams in Adobe Illustrator (Oct. 17, 2018)

Adobe Illustrator is a common tool used by graphic designers, but it also has many applications for students and professionals in other fields. Although it can be a daunting tool to learn, it is extremely powerful for creating custom figures and diagrams for your projects. In this workshop, participants will:

  • Learn about the Adobe Illustrator interface and layout.
  • Explore the different pen and shape tools available, as well as color, fill, strokes, and brush effects.
  • Build figures and diagrams using the introduced tools.
  • Advance from a sketched out idea to a more fully developed figure or diagram within Adobe Illustrator.
  • Import and adjust free icons into Adobe Illustrator figures and diagrams.
  • Explore other learning resources for Adobe Illustrator such as Lynda.com through the Columbus Metropolitan Library.
Grant Writing: An Introduction (Oct. 18, 2018)

We will address some of the similarities and differences between the funding processes for federal/state agencies and private foundations. Topics include:

  • Best practices for engaging with sponsors
  • Navigating the research administration/proposal development and submission process
  • Drafting a compelling narrative
  • Seeking funding; Including the SPIN Funding Opportunities system and other funding resources
  • Examples of writing that is both persuasive and clear

Presenters include:

Leanda Rix, Executive Director, Foundation Relations
Jeff Agnoli, Office of Research

Wiki Education (Oct. 22, 2018)

With the sheer volume of information now available on the internet, having trustworthy, accurate digital resources is more important than ever. The general public no longer only turns to publishers, subject matter experts, or even news outlets for most of their information; they also look to Wikipedia. But Wikipedia is edited by volunteers, with varying interests, educational contexts, and access to academic publications. The site still lacks detailed and accurate articles about all topics, in all languages, and many articles are inaccurate, misrepresented, or missing altogether.

That’s why Wiki Education, a nonprofit organization dedicated to improving Wikipedia’s quality, equity, and reach is working to amplify the impact of your courses, libraries, and student research. By joining one of Wiki Education’s programs, you can help add reliable, accessible academic information to the world’s largest free encyclopedia. Any instructor, librarian or staff member may participate by assigning students to edit Wikipedia’s contentlearning how to contribute to Wikipedia themselves, or providing Wikipedia volunteers with remote access to scholarship related to your field.

During this workshop, we will discuss content gaps on Wikipedia, and we will encourage attendees to join our initiatives to close these gaps and make information more accessible and comprehensible to the public. Wiki Education staff will share: assignment template for student research projects; learning benefits for students and scholars; and details about Wiki Education’s suite of tools, trainings, and Wikipedia expertise available to program participants.

GIS for Research II: Essential Skills for GIS Data Management and Visualization (Oct. 24, 2018)

Geographic Information Systems (GIS) are becoming increasingly recognized by researchers across a wide range of disciplines for their use in answering questions, solving problems, and making decisions. Despite the powerful tools and potential benefits associated with GIS, researchers often perceive barriers to entry when it comes to learning new skills in this area, similar to challenges encountered when trying to learn any new software or technology. The aim of this workshop is to lower those barriers for researchers new to GIS by focusing on some of the most common tasks and essential skills for getting started with GIS data management and visualization. In this workshop, participants will:

  • Gain hands-on experience using ArcGIS Desktop, the industry-leading GIS software
  • Learn best practices for describing, preparing, organizing, and managing their GIS data
  • Perform fundamental GIS tasks including acquiring data, projecting data, joining data, and creating map layouts for visualization
Troubleshooting Informed Consent (Oct. 25, 2018)

The Office of Responsible Research Practices is offering a workshop on common informed consent screening and IRB review findings, and consent issues that arise during ongoing research projects. The session will:

  • Identify common submission screening questions.
  • Examine IRB-required modifications related to the consent process.
  • Discuss common post-approval monitoring findings.
  • Review best practices and available resources
Digital Projects: Management (Oct. 25, 2018)

Whether a digital research project involves a team of collaborators or a single researcher, having a “best laid” work plan often helps prevent things from going “awry”. In this presentation for humanities and arts researchers, Dr. Leigh Bonds reviews developing a work plan- breaking down a project into steps, assigning tasks, setting deadlines, determining benchmarks, etc.- and tracking progress.

Open Teaching, Learning, and Research: Making Your Scholarship More Affordable and Accessible through Open Licensing (Oct. 26, 2018)

During Open Access Week, join the University Libraries’ Copyright Services to learn more about the benefits and special considerations in making your scholarship and teaching materials openly available. This presentation will provide an introduction to the rights provided to authors under copyright law and review important points of OSU’s IP policy. We will explore the different open license options provided by Creative Commons and discuss how those licenses can be utilized in your teaching and research.

Citation Tracking and Research Metrics Working Session (Oct. 30, 2018)

These small group hands-on sessions will focus on tracking citations to your work and gathering research metrics such as h-index, journal impact factors, and alternative metrics.  After a brief overview of the available tools (e.g. Web of Science, Scopus, Journal Citation Reports, Altmetric, etc.) the bulk of the time will available for participants to gather their own information, ask questions, and receive individualized assistance.  Bring your own laptop or other device.

Introduction to Tableau for Data Visualization (Nov. 1, 2018)

Tableau is a data visualization program that offers both quick and flexible methods of visualizing your data in a variety of ways, including through interactive dashboards. Offering ways to explore your dataset as well as explain it, Tableau combines ease of use and powerful options for engaging your audience with interesting visualizations. In this workshop, participants will:

  • Learn about the different types of Tableau that exist and how they can access the program.
  • Discover the Tableau interface and learn how to import and connect data to Tableau itself.
  • Explore how to quickly visualize data with different chart types and through dashboards.
  • Interact with other resources like Tableau Public’s Gallery and knowledge bank to help learn about Tableau beyond this workshop.
Publishing: Understanding and Negotiating the Terms of Your Agreement (Nov. 5, 2018)

Join the University Libraries’ Copyright Services for a workshop on understanding and negotiating the terms of your publishing agreement. We will discuss common phrases and terms found in scholarly journal articles, how those terms may impact how you use and share your research, and tactics for retaining the rights that are important to you. In this workshop, participants will have the opportunity to practice reviewing and negotiating terms using a sample publishing agreement.

Corporate Research Engagement 101 (Nov. 6, 2018)

Many factors are driving an increase in engagement between universities and industry; including increased competition for redirected and/or declining governmental research investments and the creation of products and markets that require a workforce with new skills. As University researchers navigate these dynamics it is important to understand the extent to which successful relationships are dependent on an understanding of corporate decision making, the ability to manage expectations, and taking a holistic approach to finding win-win value propositions on the industry/university engagement continuum. Strategic partnerships in this domain merge the discovery-driven culture of the university with the innovation-driven environment of the company. To make the chemistry work, each side must overcome the cultural and communications differences that often impair industry/university partnerships of all types and undercut their potential. This seminar led by the Industry Liaison Office addresses the industry-university opportunities by providing researchers with a fundamental understanding of the value of industry engagement and the engagement continuum, tools for rapidly vetting and solidifying industrial opportunities, and knowledge of the support resources at OSU that are key to helping secure and nurture industrial relationships.

Making your Science Accessible (Nov. 6, 2018)

This introductory workshop is designed specifically for researchers, scientists, data analysts and others who want to share their research succinctly with their audiences. Topics included are:

  • Identifying the level of your audiences’ knowledge.
  • Building context.
  • Laddering complex ideas for clearer understanding.
  • Showcasing what is possible.

This event is sponsored by the University LibrariesOffice of ResearchDiscovery Themes, and the STEAM Factory.

Increasing the Visibility of Your Research (Nov. 7, 2018)

This workshop will discuss the strategies and outlets for making your research more visible, including open access, scholarly profiles, social media, and The Conversation. Presenters include:

  • Nancy Courtney, Research Impact Librarian, University Libraries
  • Jeff Grabmeier, Senior Director, Research Communications
Grant Writing: An Introduction (Nov. 13, 2018)

We will address some of the similarities and differences between the funding processes for federal/state agencies and private foundations. Topics include:

  • Best practices for engaging with sponsors
  • Navigating the research administration/proposal development and submission process
  • Drafting a compelling narrative
  • Seeking funding; Including the SPIN Funding Opportunities system and other funding resources
  • Examples of writing that is both persuasive and clear

Presenters include:

Kristina Ward, Director, Foundation Relations
Jeff Agnoli, Office of Research

Sharing Your Research with Story Maps (Nov. 27, 2018)

Want to make a map that will help you share the stories being uncovered through your research and make them accessible to a broader audience? ArcGIS Story Maps combine maps, data, and multimedia content – text, photos, videos, and audio – to communicate information effectively through interactive and user-friendly web mapping applications. In this workshop, participants will:

  • Sign-up for access to ArcGIS Online using their OSU username and password
  • Explore the Story Maps gallery and learn more about the wide range of web app templates available
  • Build a Story Map to illustrate an example of their use in communicating research topics
Citation Tracking and Research Metrics Working Session (Nov. 28, 2018)

These small group hands-on sessions will focus on tracking citations to your work and gathering research metrics such as h-index, journal impact factors, and alternative metrics.  After a brief overview of the available tools (e.g. Web of Science, Scopus, Journal Citation Reports, Altmetric, etc.) the bulk of the time will available for participants to gather their own information, ask questions, and receive individualized assistance.

Copyright Considerations for Research (Dec. 3, 2018)

Who owns the copyright in the works you create? What permissions do you need to share or include another’s content in your research? Join the University Libraries’ Copyright Services for a presentation on the basics of copyright. Topics included are: the types of works that may be protected by copyright, your rights as an author, and the different exceptions and limitations in the law that permit certain uses of copyrighted content.

Corporate Research Engagement 101 (Dec. 4, 2018)

Many factors are driving an increase in engagement between universities and industry; including increased competition for redirected and/or declining governmental research investments and the creation of products and markets that require a workforce with new skills. As University researchers navigate these dynamics it is important to understand the extent to which successful relationships are dependent on an understanding of corporate decision making, the ability to manage expectations, and taking a holistic approach to finding win-win value propositions on the industry/university engagement continuum. Strategic partnerships in this domain merge the discovery-driven culture of the university with the innovation-driven environment of the company. To make the chemistry work, each side must overcome the cultural and communications differences that often impair industry/university partnerships of all types and undercut their potential. This seminar led by the Industry Liaison Office addresses the industry-university opportunities by providing researchers with a fundamental understanding of the value of industry engagement and the engagement continuum, tools for rapidly vetting and solidifying industrial opportunities, and knowledge of the support resources at OSU that are key to helping secure and nurture industrial relationships.

Citation Tracking and Research Metrics Working Session (Dec. 18, 2018)

These small group hands-on sessions will focus on tracking citations to your work and gathering research metrics such as h-index, journal impact factors, and alternative metrics.  After a brief overview of the available tools (e.g. Web of Science, Scopus, Journal Citation Reports, Altmetric, etc.) the bulk of the time will available for participants to gather their own information, ask questions, and receive individualized assistance. 

ADVANCE Faculty Research Lecture Series

Ohio State ADVANCE launches a new faculty research lecture series focusing on the research journey of Ohio State faculty. Each lecture will feature the research of an invited faculty speaker. Speakers will also share their own research journey as a way to highlight both the challenges and successes that are part of the research process.

Past and Contemporary Climate Change: Evidence from Earth’s Cryosphere (Sep. 10, 2018)

About the Speaker: 

Ellen Mosley-Thompson is a Distinguished University Professor in the Department of Geography (Atmospheric Science Program) and the Director of the Byrd Polar and Climate Research Center at The Ohio State University.  She uses the chemical and physical properties preserved in cores collected from both polar ice sheets and high mountain glaciers to reconstruct Earth’s complex climate history.  These records indicate that Earth’s climate has moved outside the range of natural variability experienced over at least the last 2000 years.  She has led nine expeditions to Antarctica and six to Greenland to retrieve ice cores.  In 2010 she led the field team for the ice core drilling project on Bruce Plateau (Antarctic Peninsula), a U.S. contribution to the International Polar Year, where the team collected a 448-meter core to bedrock.  She has published 133 peer-reviewed papers and is the recipient of 51 research grants. She is an elected member of the National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the American Philosophical Society and is an elected Fellow of the American Geophysical Union and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. She recently served on the NRC-NAS Committee that produced the 2014 report “The Arctic in the Anthropocene: Emerging Research Questions.”

20/20 Vision (Oct. 8, 2018)

About the Speaker:

Melissa D Bailey, OD, PhD is an associate professor at The Ohio State University (OSU) College of Optometry. She received her optometry degree and PhD in vision science from The Ohio State University. Dr. Bailey’s research career is devoted to developing new technologies for use in eye care as well as her research on the role of the ciliary muscle in the development of myopia and accommodative function in children.

In 2015, Dr. Bailey was selected as the Early Career Innovator of the Year at The Ohio State University for her work in developing patented methods for measuring the ciliary muscle.

She is currently teamed up with two local startup companies. Sight4All, Inc., is working with Dr. Bailey to develop new, patent-pending ways to estimate a patient’s glasses prescription and also measure eye alignment with a smart phone. Sight4All, Inc. Dr. Bailey is also working with Lentechs, LLC to bring a novel, bifocal contact lens design to market with her collaborator, Joseph Barr, OD, MS.

Biobehavioral Aspects of Cancer (Nov. 5, 2018)

About the Speaker:

Barbara L. Andersen is a Distinguished University Professor and a Distinguished Professor in the Department of Psychology, with a joint appointment in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the Ohio State University. She is trained as a clinical psychologist with expertise in behavioral medicine.  As professor of psychology and member of the OSU Comprehensive Cancer Center (CCC) Cancer Control and Immunology Programs since 1989, her research portfolio focuses broadly upon biobehavioral aspects of cancer, studies of psychological mechanisms leading to changes in immunity, inflammation, and poor health outcomes, including cancer progression, and psychological intervention development, testing, and dissemination.  She previously held an NIH/National Cancer Institute (K05) Research Career Award (Established Investigator Award in Cancer Prevention, Control, Behavioral, and Population Sciences from 2004 to 2014.  She has authored three books and over 170 research articles in clinical psychology and cancer control and her research has been continuously funded since 1983.  While at the University of Iowa she received the Distinguished Faculty Award in Teaching (1985) and the Distinguished Scholar Award in Research (1988).  Moving to Ohio State University (OSU) in 1989, she has received the Distinguished Scholar Award (2000) and the Distinguished Lecturer Award (2003).  For the OSU Comprehensive Cancer Center, she was the first Director of the Behavioral Measurement Shared Resource and the Livestrong Survivorship Center of Excellence (2008-2011).  Other awards include the Senior Investigator Award for Outstanding Contributions in Health Psychology from the American Psychological Association (2003), the Minton Hero of Hope Medal of Honor from the ACS (Ohio, 2004), Fellow status in AAAS (2004), Distinguished Senior Investigator Award from the Society of Behavioral Medicine (Cancer SIG, 2015), and the award for Outstanding Education and Training from the American Psychosocial Oncology Society, 2018

Science Cafe Sessions

Disciplinary Illusions: Enter the Trans (Sep. 5, 2018)

Our speaker will:

  • Describe and then argue for transdiciplinarity approaches and efforts as being crucial to solving the world’s big problems of the day.
  • Provide examples from the speaker’s work and research.
  • Describe a design process the speaker has been developing that supports and fosters transdisciplinary creations.

 Speaker: Alex Oliszewski, Associate Professor of Media Design

Alex Oliszewski’s specialization is in theatrical media design + devising. His technical knowledge includes sound, lighting, stagecraft, and performance in video, musical, dance, play, and interactive forms. His MFA graduate studies in Interdisciplinary Digital Media and Theatre at Arizona State University. His interdisciplinary work includes online training resources for women in STEM, dementia care training, public art, and course development work.

Hackathon Stars and Their Winning Projects (Nov. 7, 2018)

HackOHI/O is over after October 28th, then it’s time to hear from the winning teams! Make sure to come and hear about the projects that won prizes at HackOHI/O 2018.

Information Sessions

Publishing Grants for Open Access Digital Monographs in the Humanities and Humanistic Social Sciences (Nov. 8, 2018)

The Ohio State University Libraries (OSUL) is funding Open Access scholarly monographs in the humanities and humanistic social sciences. OSUL has committed to funding awards of up to $15,000.  Awards will be provided as subventions to participating university presses. Our next deadline for expressions of interest is November 16, 2018. To learn more about this initiative and how to submit a proposal, please attend this information session.