University Libraries Exhibits The King James Bible Virtual Exhibit Illustrations of the Book of Job

Illustrations of the Book of Job
  • Book of Job (1826) - Title Plate
            
    Book of Job (1826) - Title Plate
  • Book of Job (1826) - Plate 1
            
    Book of Job (1826) - Plate 1
  • Book of Job (1826) - Plate 2
            
    Book of Job (1826) - Plate 2
  • Book of Job (1826) - Plate 3
            
    Book of Job (1826) - Plate 3
  • Book of Job (1826) - Plate 4
            
    Book of Job (1826) - Plate 4
  • Book of Job (1826) - Plate 5
            
    Book of Job (1826) - Plate 5
  • Book of Job (1826) - Plate 6
            
    Book of Job (1826) - Plate 6
  • Book of Job (1826) - Plate 7
            
    Book of Job (1826) - Plate 7
  • Book of Job (1826) - Plate 8
            
    Book of Job (1826) - Plate 8
  • Book of Job (1826) - Plate 9
            
    Book of Job (1826) - Plate 9
  • Book of Job (1826) - Plate 10
            
    Book of Job (1826) - Plate 10
  • Book of Job (1826) - Plate 11
            
    Book of Job (1826) - Plate 11
  • Book of Job (1826) - Plate 12
            
    Book of Job (1826) - Plate 12
  • Book of Job (1826) - Plate 13
            
    Book of Job (1826) - Plate 13
  • Book of Job (1826) - Plate 14
            
    Book of Job (1826) - Plate 14
  • Book of Job (1826) - Plate 15
            
    Book of Job (1826) - Plate 15
  • Book of Job (1826) - Plate 16
            
    Book of Job (1826) - Plate 16
  • Book of Job (1826) - Plate 17
            
    Book of Job (1826) - Plate 17
  • Book of Job (1826) - Plate 18
            
    Book of Job (1826) - Plate 18
  • Book of Job (1826) - Plate 19
            
    Book of Job (1826) - Plate 19
  • Book of Job (1826) - Plate 20
            
    Book of Job (1826) - Plate 20
  • Book of Job (1826) - Plate 21
            
    Book of Job (1826) - Plate 21

William Blake (1757-1827) subscribed to a religious tradition that conceptualized the Bible not as the Word of God itself—which is Christ—but rather as the inseparable witness to the Word. In this view, the Bible becomes a spur to imagination, inspiring readers to visualize and interpret the reality of the Bible's account of history. The twenty-two intaglio engravings Blake created to retell the Book of Job reflect this emphasis on visualization and interpretation, offering viewers some of the most ambitious and compelling graphical interpretations of the Bible ever produced. The engravings go beyond providing a simple literal interpretation of Job's story; they also offer us a look at how one particular reader—who just so happened to be one of the most creative artists of his time—imagined and understood the text for himself.