Faculty Publications

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University Libraries is a vibrant, dynamic community of world-class faculty and staff redefining what a university library can and should be. Expert researchers and scholars, their work is helping promote a more engaged and better informed society.

Photograph of Jane Hammons

Jane Hammons

Teaching & Learning Engagement Librarian

Strategic Instruction through Connected One-Shots


Publication Date:
Publication Type: Book Chapter

Hidden Architectures of Information Literacy Programs attempts to make all information literacy program labor visible, raise its importance, and encourage more scholarship on what might seem like the “boring” parts of program development. This book is for graduate students learning about information literacy programs, administrators who may never have taught an information literacy session, instruction librarians looking to step out of the everyday and understand the depth and breadth of their program, and all educators interested in the accomplishments and inner workings of information literacy programming.

Photograph of Amanda Folk

Amanda Folk

Head of Teaching & Learning

Mathematics Courses and the Ohio Open Ed Collaborative: Collaborative Course Content Building for Statewide Use


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Publication Type: Book Chapter

With the cost of higher education increasingly on the minds of students and a rising amount of course time being spent in a virtual environment, initiatives to provide online course content at low or no cost to students are an important way to make higher education more affordable. The initiative described in this chapter is an example of how Ohio tackled this issue, providing access to course content for use across the state. The materials developed are fully available online and are provided at no additional cost to students. This chapter focuses on efforts to develop materials for mathematics courses, but the Ohio Open Ed Collaborative included courses from multiple disciplines for the Ohio higher education community. With users beyond Ohio able to adapt most of the content as well, this initiative adds valuable content that enables course instructors around the world to adapt affordable online content for their classes.

This article was co-authored with Daniel Dotson and four other authors from different institutions.

Photograph of Jane Hammons

Jane Hammons

Teaching & Learning Engagement Librarian

Teaching the teachers to teach information literacy: A literature review


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Publication Type: Article

As part of the ongoing debates over the best methods for teaching information literacy, some librarians have argued for a “teach the teachers” strategy. In this approach, librarians concentrate some of their instructional energies on teaching disciplinary faculty to teach information literacy. In this paper, multiple examples of “teach the teachers” efforts are reviewed, in order to provide insight into the impact that taking this approach might have on librarians, faculty, and students. Results indicate that the “teach the teachers” approach shows promise as one method by which librarians can support the integration of information literacy into the curriculum, but that more assessment is needed to determine the long-term impact of such initiatives on faculty teaching practices and students' information literacy development.

Photograph of Jane Hammons

Jane Hammons

Teaching & Learning Engagement Librarian

Teaching information literacy: Developing an online course for faculty


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Publication Type: Article

As part of the profession’s ongoing efforts to integrate information literacy into the curriculum, some librarians have taken an approach centered on teaching disciplinary faculty to teach information literacy. Indeed, some have argued that the best way for librarians to ensure that students are developing information literacy is to focus primarily on faculty, rather than on providing instruction to students. Although most librarians do not seem prepared to stop all direct instruction to students, there are many examples of libraries offering faculty development programming. While many of these programs involve face-to-face interactions between librarians and disciplinary faculty, there are examples of librarians creating online information literacy workshops or courses for faculty.

Photograph of Beth Black

Beth Black

Undergraduate Engagement Librarian

Instructional design for single information literacy sessions


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Publication Type: Article

The purpose of this paper is to describe how the Understanding by Design instructional design framework can be applied to design high-quality single-session information literacy instruction. The author describes the Understanding by Design process in detail, noting modifications for single instructional session design with examples from the application of this instructional design process to design co-curricular instruction sessions for undergraduates.

Photograph of Daniel Dotson

Daniel Dotson

Head of Geology Library

Google Scholar Versions: Errors and Implications


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Publication Type: Article

Google Scholar combines versions of what should be the same item into a single record with multiple versions listed and a common citation rate for all versions. However, these versions are not always the same document. A study on the citations of theses and dissertations found unusually high citation rates for some titles. On closer examination, these titles had versions that were other formats, sometimes with additional authors. A close examination of highly cited theses and dissertations revealed that nearly half of the titles were considered versions of other different formats, often much shorter and sometimes multi-authored journal articles.

Photograph of Florian Diekmann

Florian Diekmann

Head of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (FAES) Library, Science Liaison Librarian

A scoping review of research funding for small-scale farmers in water scarce regions


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Publication Type: Article

Water scarcity is a global issue that disproportionately affects small-scale farmers in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Through geospatial analysis, we estimated that less than 37% of small-scale farms probably have irrigation in water scarce regions across LMICs, compared with 42% of non-small-scale farms. Through a literature synthesis assisted by machine learning, we then systematically mapped the existing research for on-farm interventions that improve the incomes or yields of small-scale farmers in water scarce regions. We mapped over 888 on-farm interventions used to combat water scarcity from 560 publications and showed a research bias towards yields rather than livelihoods. We found gaps in evidence for many commonly proposed solutions, including livestock management, digital technology and solutions to protect natural resources at the farm-level, such as buffer strips. Our findings can be used to set a funding agenda for research on the geographies that are most at risk of water scarcity and the interventions that most lack evidence.

Photograph of Jessica Page

Jessica Page

Head of Veterinary Medicine Library, Science Liaison Librarian, Associate Professor

A scoping review on incentives for adoption of sustainable agricultural practices and their outcomes


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Publication Type: Article

The increasing pressure on agricultural production systems to achieve global food security and prevent environmental degradation necessitates a transition towards more sustainable practices. The purpose of this scoping review is to understand how the incentives offered to farmers motivate the adoption of sustainable agricultural practices and, ultimately, how and whether they result in measurable outcomes. To this end, this scoping review examines the evidence of nearly 18,000 papers on whether incentive-based programmes lead to the adoption of sustainable practices and their effect on environmental, economic and productivity outcomes. We find that independent of the incentive type, programmes linked to short-term economic benefit have a higher adoption rate than those aimed solely at providing an ecological service. In the long run, one of the strongest motivations for farmers to adopt sustainable practices is perceived benefits for either their farms, the environment or both. Beyond this, the importance of technical assistance and extension services in promoting sustainable practices emerges strongly from this scoping review. Finally, we find that policy instruments are more effective if their design considers the characteristics of the target population, and the associated trade-offs between economic, environmental and social outcomes.

Photograph of Daniel Dotson

Daniel Dotson

Head of Geology Library

Affordability of course materials: Reactive and proactive measures at The Ohio State University Libraries


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Publication Type: Article

The Ohio State University Libraries has been working on affordability issues related to course materials for some time. This article details some of those efforts, going into detail about moving from reactive methods of dealing with course materials via instructor-initiated reserve requests to more proactive methods of a general education textbook project and curriculum mapping to provide information about ebooks and streaming media as course content.

This article was co-authored with Aaron Olivera.

Photograph of Hilary Bussell

Hilary Bussell

Assistant Professor

When Two Homes Are Better Than One: Collaborating on Cross-Institutional Research


Publication Date:
Publication Type: Book Chapter

In this chapter, we describe the process of working on a cross-institutional study. We begin with background information on our study’s aims and methods and then move on to the nuts and bolts of collaborating on a research project with librarians at other institutions. We discuss designing a research project, applying for IRB approval at multiple institutions, obtaining funding, collaborating on data analysis and the literature review process, project management and communicating, establishing realistic timeframes and goals, and collaborating on writing up and disseminating your research. We conclude the chapter with a reflection on the value of cross-institutional research and lessons learned from our experience.

Photograph of Craig Gibson

Craig Gibson

Professional Development Librarian

The Engaged Librarian Framework at The Ohio State University Libraries


Publication Date:
Publication Type: Article

Photograph of Jessica Page

Jessica Page

Head of Veterinary Medicine Library, Science Liaison Librarian, Associate Professor

Expanding a single-institution survey to multiple institutions: Lessons learned in research design and deployment


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Publication Type: Article

Creating generalizable knowledge across institutions is a step beyond a successful local research project. The purpose of this article is to share the process and lessons learned from expanding a survey tool developed and piloted at a single veterinary college to its deployment at multiple veterinary colleges in the United States and Canada.

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Jolie Braun

Curator of Modern Literature & Manuscripts

Your Zine Changed My Life’: The Impact and Legacy of Zines in Sassy Magazine


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Publication Type: Article

The teen magazine Sassy (1988–1996) positioned itself as an edgier alternative to its competitors; underground culture, and particularly zines, were important parts of its identity. By featuring zines by young women and girls, Sassy made reading and writing zines accessible to its readers. This message was especially powerful within the context of Sassy’s larger project of encouraging readers to produce their own media. Yet as small-circulation, self-published works, zines are not intended for mainstream audiences, and some zine writers saw the magazine’s interest as exploitative. This essay explores the consequences of covering them in a mainstream magazine for teen girls.

Photograph of Hilary Bussell

Hilary Bussell

Assistant Professor

Meeting graduate student needs: An exploration of disciplinary differences


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Publication Type: Article

To better engage our graduate students, we asked them to describe their research strategy and challenges, helpful research support services, and their preferred venue for learning research skills. We conducted a thematic analysis and found that participants’ top reported research strategies included “Research Topic Development” and “Literature Review,” while their challenges cited “Finding and Evaluating Information” and “Access Issues.” The students mentioned “Library Databases” most frequently as helpful and websites were their most preferred learning venue. We found evidence that discipline-specific library instruction may be more relevant than large, in-person orientations and discovered a concerning trend of situational challenges.

Photograph of Hilary Bussell

Hilary Bussell

Assistant Professor

Meeting graduate student needs: An exploration of disciplinary differences


Publication Date:
Publication Type: Article

To better engage our graduate students, we asked them to describe their research strategy and challenges, helpful research support services, and their preferred venue for learning research skills. We conducted a thematic analysis and found that participants’ top reported research strategies included “Research Topic Development” and “Literature Review,” while their challenges cited “Finding and Evaluating Information” and “Access Issues.” The students mentioned “Library Databases” most frequently as helpful and websites were their most preferred learning venue. We found evidence that discipline-specific library instruction may be more relevant than large, in-person orientations and discovered a concerning trend of situational challenges.

This article was co-authored with Jennifer Schnabel and Amanda Rinehart.

Photograph of Amanda Larson

Amanda Larson

Affordable Learning Instructional Consultant

Exploring Faculty Perceptions of OER and Impediments to their Use: A Multi-Institutional Study.


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Publication Type: Article

Understanding faculty perceptions about OER is a vital step for those hoping to support the growth of OER initiatives at higher education institutions. Faculty members’ perceptions of OER often influence their interest in adopting open educational practices and their willingness to seek out support from campus staff. To explore how faculty members across their four institutions feel about open education, the authors developed a survey to discover faculty members’ (1) perspectives on, (2) barriers to, and (3) beliefs about OER use. The survey corroborated past research findings that faculty often have difficulty finding time to locate and evaluate OER, and that there is a need among the academic community to better compensate educators for their work developing open content. More notably, the authors discovered that the faculty who are aware of library support services and other institutional OER initiatives are more engaged in open educational practices and willing to explore OER, regardless of their prior experience with open education.

Photograph of Amanda Larson

Amanda Larson

Affordable Learning Instructional Consultant

Open Education Librarianship: A Position Description Analysis of the Newly Emerging Role in Academic Libraries


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Publication Type: Article

According to the latest Babson Survey, Freeing the Textbook: Educational Resources in US Higher Education, “faculty awareness of OER has increased every year, with 46 percent of faculty now aware of open educational resources, up from 34 percent three years ago” (Seaman and Seaman 2018). While open educational resources (OER) gain traction with faculty who are looking to lower costs for their students and re-engage with their pedagogy, academic libraries are creating a variety of open or affordable textbook programs to help increase the use of OER or low-cost materials as replacements for high-cost traditional materials. Some libraries are creating specific positions to support these initiatives that aim to help faculty who want to adopt, adapt, or author OER. As more of these roles emerge, it raises questions about what the field perceives as the role of an Open Education or OER librarian, and the support that libraries provide OER initiatives. To explore these concerns, I collected position descriptions for librarians whose role it is to support OER initiatives into a corpus. I applied deductive thematic analysis to code it while investigating four main questions: 1) What inspires academic libraries to hire OER-related support? 2) What skills do they anticipate applicants to possess? 3) Where do these positions fit within the organization chart of the library? 4) Is there a standard scope of work that emerges from the corpus? In addition to these four questions, this research also explored the expectations for librarians in these roles to change faculty’s perception of OER through outreach and if they are expected to run burgeoning grant initiatives to launch adoption, adaptation, or authoring efforts at their institution.

Photograph of Daniel Dotson

Daniel Dotson

Head of Geology Library

Big in the Big Ten: Highly Cited Works and Their Characteristics


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Publication Type: Article

For this study, the 100 most highly cited items from Scopus were examined for each Big Ten Academic Alliance school (plus University of Chicago) to determine format use, subjects covered, citation counts, publisher trends, and other details. In all, 1,223 unique items were examined. Journals and commercial publishers dominated, but were not exclusive. Similarly, expected titles Science and Nature appeared, but did not overwhelmingly dominate the citation counts nor the number of appearances in the results. The publication title list included 479 unique titles, with many journal titles appeared only once. Science titles dominated, with some social sciences (especially psychology) titles showing up in the highly cited list. Total citation counts varied widely across institutions. The schools examined had a good degree of inter-institution collaboration.

Photograph of Michael Flierl

Michael Flierl

Information Literacy & Research Engagement Librarian

Refining information literacy practice: Examining the foundations of information literacy theory


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Publication Type: Article

There are many ways for an academic librarian to contribute to the teaching and learning mission of an institution ranging from direct instruction to assignment design. Given this plethora of information literacy educational practices, what should academic librarians and educators focus time, labor, and resources on, and why should they do so? With an eye towards improving information literacy educational practice and addressing these fundamental questions, we examine the foundational philosophical commitments of two information literacy theories, Critical Information Literacy and Informed Learning. We find that these information literacy theories may be biased towards a 20th-century European worldview. This finding supports the idea that “good” IL educational practice in higher education requires active engagement with information literacy theory to justify what one does as an educator and to demonstrate why information literacy can be integral to learning in higher education.

Photograph of Pamela Espinosa de los Monteros

Pamela Espinosa de los Monteros

Latin American Studies Librarian, Assistant Professor

Decolonial Information Practices: Repatriating and Stewarding the Popol Vuh Online


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Publication Type: Article

The digitization and online dissemination of the Popol Vuh, a historical indigenous knowledge work, poses distinct ethical, legal, intellectual, and technological concerns for humanities researchers and information practitioners seeking to study and digitally curate works through a decolonized consciousness. Ongoing debates on data sovereignty, the repatriation of cultural artifacts, and cultural appropriation question the ability of researchers and information practitioners to effectively steward indigenous knowledge works in a digital environment. While consensus on best practices for the postcolonial digital library or archive remain to be established, information inequity continues to persist, effacing indigenous knowledge, languages, and content from the knowledge society. The following case study will discuss the results of a 10-year multi-institutional initiative to curate, repatriate, and steward the reproduction of an indigenous knowledge work online. From the vantage point of the library, the case study will explore the project’s successes, failures, and the work left to be done.

Photograph of Michael Flierl

Michael Flierl

Information Literacy & Research Engagement Librarian

Academic librarians’ experiences as faculty developers: A phenomenographic study


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Publication Type: Article

Academic libraries are integral to the teaching and learning missions of colleges and universities. Yet, libraries continue to face substantial challenges in their work to advance student learning, especially regarding the sustainability and scalability of their instructional efforts. This paper describes a phenomenographic research project that investigated the varied experiences of Purdue University Libraries faculty members participating in the IMPACT faculty development program. The findings suggest that academic librarians are capable of acting as faculty developers who can engage faculty in conversations, which may or may not relate to information literacy, to advance student-centered teaching and learning environments.

Photograph of Courtney Hunt

Courtney Hunt

Art and Design Librarian

Wicked, Hard, and Supple: An Examination of Suzanne Valadon’s Nude Drawings of Young Maurice


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Publication Type: Article

This article examines the nude drawings Suzanne Valadon made of her young son, Maurice Utrillo. These drawings, depicting Utrillo from late childhood until adolescence, began Valadon's interest in the male nude, which she carried into her later career. Though children appeared often in her work, the drawings of Utrillo are complicated by the relationship between the artist and subject.

Photograph of Beth Snapp

Beth Snapp

Head of Applications Development & Operations

Integrating Lean UX Practices Into the Development of Library Systems


Publication Date:
Publication Type: Article

Beth Snapp and Michelle Henley were recently published in Computers in Libraries. This cover article details the process of iterative changes and incorporating user feedback into improvements for Discover.

Photograph of Joshua Sadvari

Joshua Sadvari

Geospatial Information Librarian

Mapping Concepts to Locate Learning Opportunities: Aligning the ACRL Framework to the GIS&T Body of Knowledge


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Publication Type: Article

The adoption of the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education in 2016 coincided with the launch of the digital edition of the Geographic Information Science and Technology (GIS&T) Body of Knowledge. The GIS&T Body of Knowledge and the ACRL Framework share a common goal of providing a flexible, community-driven, living document to support teaching and learning in higher education. The Body of Knowledge serves as a representation of the GIS&T knowledge domain, while the ACRL Framework aids librarians in integrating core information literacy concepts into instruction in their respective knowledge domains. Despite this connection, no attempt to evaluate how these guiding documents can be aligned to one another to inform instructional practice has yet been reported. This study uses a relative crosswalk approach to map connections between the knowledge practices and dispositions in the ACRL Framework and the learning objectives in the GIS&T Body of Knowledge. This analysis highlights alignment between these documents and can serve as a conceptual foundation to make it easier for map, geospatial, and subject librarians to identify practical opportunities for integrating information literacy instruction into GIS&T education, both independently and in collaboration with disciplinary faculty.

Photograph of Jane Hammons

Jane Hammons

Teaching & Learning Engagement Librarian

Identifying the Components of a Research Article


Publication Date:
Publication Type: Book Chapter

The focus of this chapter is on an activity designed to help students to identify, and explain the purpose of, commonly included sections in a research article such as the abstract, methods, discussion and more, in the hopes that they will be able to more critically read articles.

Photograph of Hanna Primeau

Hanna Primeau

Instructional Designer

Quit Serving CRAAP, Start making DRAMA


Publication Date:
Publication Type: Book Chapter

The chapter leads the reader through an activity that is paired with learning technologies. It focuses on giving students a process to begin thinking critically about source evaluation, specifically web resources, and a basic acronym to guide their thoughts. This will hopefully help students identify areas to investigate, rather than creating a checklist of things that create the “perfect” resource.

Photograph of Leta Hendricks

Leta Hendricks

African American and African Studies Librarian, Comparative Studies Librarian, Interim Anthropology Librarian, Assistant Professor

Discovering a Hidden Figure of Service and Leadership: The Reverend Charles Edgar Newsome, MD


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Publication Type: Article

Collaborative research between the University School of Medicine Office of Diversity and Inclusion, Health Sciences Library and Department of African and African American Studies recently identified Dr. Charles Edgar Newsome as the institution's first African American physician graduate in 1893. Born May 25, 1856 in the town of Buffalo within Putnam County of Northwest Virginia, he served for 3 years and 6 months as a member of the Regimental Band of the United States Army 25th Infantry, also known as the Buffalo Soldiers, became Grand Master of the Grand United Order of Odd Fellows, and served communities of the state as a reverend, physician, and civic leader. Archival records and photographs uncover the remarkable life of Reverend Charles Edgar Newsome, MD, a hidden figure in history.

Photograph of Beth Kattelman

Beth Kattelman

Curator of the Jerome Lawrence and Robert E. Lee Theatre Research Institute, Associate Professor

Folk Horror in the Ozarks: The Genre Hybridity of Debra Granik’s Winter’s Bone


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Publication Type: Article

Kattelman’s essay appears in a special issue devoted to folk horror and positions the film Winter’s Bone as a hybrid that sits on the cusp of that genre and several others. The essay discusses how the film’s hybridity can offer unique insights into norms and construction of the folk horror genre.

Photograph of Michael Flierl

Michael Flierl

Information Literacy & Research Engagement Librarian

Training the trainer to embed IL into curricula


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Publication Type: Article

Academic libraries have long recognised the benefits of integrating information literacy into disciplinary curricula. One model that addresses the common problems of sustainability and scalability of such efforts is the train the trainer model, where academic librarians serve as faculty developers. Improving faculty development efforts requires understanding the methods and strategies of librarians engaged in this work. Using an action research methodology, this paper investigated the experiences of librarians and disciplinary instructors participating in a course redesign program at a large, public university in the midwestern United States, in order to identify effective strategies for engaging with disciplinary instructors about information literacy. Findings include focusing on pragmatic, contextual ways in which students will need to use information in the future, providing professional development opportunities for librarians to further develop faculty development skills, and prioritising strong collaborations between librarians and other academic units.