Digital Scholarship @ The Libraries

Inspiring innovative digital scholarship at the OSU Libraries and beyond

Category: The Knowledge Bank (page 1 of 2)

Staff position: Repository and Publishing Services Program Assistant

The Libraries’ fabulous Digital Content Services department is looking for a Program Assistant to support our repository and publishing programs. An excerpt from the job posting:

The Program Assistant performs production work for Digital Content Services across the repository and publishing programs on multiple simultaneous projects; production work includes submitting content, creating metadata, designing and documenting workflows, scheduling and supervising the production work of student assistants, and tracking projects in project database; works collaboratively with the Interim Co-Heads of the Department and other departmental staff; requires attention to detail, sound judgment and decision making, and knowledge of related and applicable software programs.

Come work with us! Read the full posting and apply by 2/28.

Staff position open in Digital Content Services

Interested in supporting digital scholarship? There is a staff position open in the Digital Content Services department, which encompasses the Knowledge Bank and Publishing Programs. An excerpt from the posting:

The Digital Content Services (DCS) Projects Coordinator performs and coordinates production work for Digital Content Services across the repository and publishing programs and multiple software platforms (e.g., DSpace and Open Journal Systems), on multiple simultaneous projects. Production work includes submitting content, creating metadata, HTML layout editing, and providing technical support; designing and documenting workflows, scheduling and supervising production work, facilitating communications, and tracking projects to completion; works collaboratively with the Interim Co-Heads of the Department and other departmental staff; requires an in-depth understanding of the suite of digital content services provided by the department, attention to detail, sound judgment and decision making, and knowledge of related and applicable software programs.

Learn more about the position and apply online at  https://www.jobsatosu.com, job opening 410104. Applications will be accepted through August 2, 2015.

6th Annual Knowledge Bank Users Group Meeting

NewKBLogo-2014On May 13, 2014, thirty-four faculty and staff from around The Ohio State University joined the Knowledge Bank team in the Thompson Library for the Sixth Annual Knowledge Bank Users Group Meeting. Participants included long-standing and established partners as well as new partners of our institutional repository and publishing programs.

KBUG2014aThis year we celebrated the tenth anniversary of the Knowledge Bank. The meeting included a retrospective of the past ten years of the Knowledge Bank, an update on the publishing program and Open Access mandates, and an interactive program focused on the Libraries’ research services. The presentation slides from the meeting are available via the Knowledge Bank.

The Knowledge Bank team would like to take this opportunity to say thank you to all of our partners for making this year’s event a huge success. The continued participation and input from our partners is invaluable to us and we appreciate the opportunity to gather as a group to talk about our goals and accomplishments.

If you have comments about this year’s meeting, or suggestions for next year, please let us know.

Standard copyright statements for the repository

Yesterday I tweeted that I had finally created a list of standard copyright statements for the repository, and why I was excited about it. I’ve had a couple of people ask to see the statements, so I figured I might as well throw them on the blog while I’m looking for a more permanent home for them in our public documentation. The statements are below the fold.

First, some context: We have a lot of content in our repository, and it runs the gamut. Published articles and preprints, gray literature, digitized library collections, audio and video, etc. The items get submitted by a variety of folks at the Libraries and around the university, and so maintaining our high metadata standards has always been a challenge. One place where we haven’t always been great is in providing copyright information. I have strong feelings about the copyright information libraries provide to their users, so it’s embarrassing that I haven’t done a better job of making it happen in my own backyard.

To remedy this, with the help of my colleagues in Digital Content Services and the Copyright Resources Center, I created a list of standard copyright statements that we can use with different types of content. I’m especially happy with these statements because they are informative – not only about the copyright status of the item(s) in question, but also about things like Fair Use and the Public Domain. Hopefully we will get around to applying them retrospectively to the content in the KB, but for now at least we will have something to draw on when we submit new content. I’m sharing it here because I know this is an area where a lot of Libraries struggle, and I hope other people will find them useful. Feel free to copy them, modify them, build on them as you like.

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Open Access Resolution – Negotiating Author’s rights

Editor’s Note: In July of 2012, the faculty of the OSU Libraries adopted an open access resolution. Under the terms of this resolution, all faculty librarians agreed to retain certain rights in their published journal articles and submit them to the Knowledge Bank. Today’s blogger, Fern Cheek from the Health Sciences Library, offered to describe her experience complying with the resolution when publishing an article. She has helpfully extrapolated some lessons for the rest of us to keep in mind as we do the same.

I would like to share my first experience regarding author’s rights. My first “wrinkle” in the process was forgetting the fact that library faculty are required to retain rights to be able to deposit the article in the Knowledge Bank. It was the first article that I had written since the mandate went into effect and it was not on my radar at the time. It arose when I was asked to sign the copyright for authors’ agreement from the editor. Now, mind you, the article had not even been accepted at this point.

Lesson #1: Talk to your co-authors

For anyone thinking about co-authoring an article, be upfront with your co-authors about this requirement in the initial discussions. After panic set in, I looked at the Open Access Resolution and emailed Melanie Schlosser for help. She referred me to the OA Resolution – Rights Help available on the Carmen wiki. After reading this information, I plunged ahead to contact my co-author and explain the requirement for the article to go into the Knowledge Bank. Thankfully, she was agreeable and offered assistance to help with the process.
I contacted the publisher, an association publisher, to ask about their policies on institutional repositories. They sent a copy and I proceeded to consult with Melanie and Sandra Enimil to make sure that I understood the requirements.

Lesson#2: Look at journal policies

Look at the copyright policies & author agreements for the journals to which you are considering submitting your manuscripts for publication. This can save you the grief that I was going through and give you an idea about whether it will be a fairly easy process or whether negotiation will be required. If so, time should be allowed for that, so it doesn’t hold up the publication. As luck would have it, the policy was one that allowed me to deposit the article, after a period of embargo. Therefore, if the manuscript was accepted for publication, I would be able to fulfill my faculty requirement.
In the health sciences, it’s more routine than not to co-author. I am just getting starting on a project, as part of a systematic review team, where I’ll be doing the literature searching. I’ve already talked with the primary investigator to let her know about my obligation to deposit the article when accepted. I’ve asked her to send me the list of journals that are being considered for submission of the manuscript.

Lesson #3: Keep the goal in mind

It does not have to be a complicated process if you keep in mind what the goal is, to share the information with a larger audience. If all else fails, you can petition for an exception if the publisher is unrelenting.

5th Annual Knowledge Bank Users Group Meeting

knowledge-bank-logoOn May 14, 2013, twenty-seven faculty and staff from around The Ohio State University joined the Knowledge Bank team in the Thompson Library for the Fifth Annual Knowledge Bank Users Group Meeting. Participants included long-standing and established partners as well as new partners of our institutional repository and publishing programs.

KBUG13-1This year’s meeting included updates on current projects by the Knowledge Bank team and large and small group discussions on the topic of open access. The presentation slides from the meeting are available via the Knowledge Bank.

KBUG13-2The Knowledge Bank team would like to take this opportunity to say thank you to all of our partners for making this year’s event a huge success. The continued participation and input from our partners is invaluable to us and we appreciate the opportunity to gather as a group to talk about our goals and accomplishments.

If you have comments about this year’s meeting, or suggestions for next year, please let us know.

You want a conference paper? Let’s cross our fingers!

Oh here we go again.  Another person wants a conference paper.  Is it online?  Nope.  I’ll search the catalog to see if we have it.  Nope.  How about OhioLINK?  Nope.  Let’s try seeing if anyone else in the world might have it!  Yes, someone does!  Oh wait, there’s only one copy of the proceedings…and it’s in Brazil.  Well, maaaaaybe Interlibrary Services can get it.

Has anything like this ever happened to you?  This is one of the reference transactions I always dreaded.  Conference papers can be so good…and so hard to find.  Outside computer science, where we’re lucky enough to have papers from most of their major conferences via a few of our full-text databases, I usually fail in many conference paper quests.

To illustrate the importance some disciplines place on conference papers, Web of Knowledge has somewhat recently added citation indexes for conferences.  Obviously, these are seeing enough demand and use that data is being tracked.  Some disciplines use them very heavily.  Computer science has A LOT of conferences and the proceedings are pretty popular.

This is why one of my most common shticks when bringing up the Knowledge Bank (KB) is to mention conference papers.  I’m sure many OSU researchers have run into the same problem with getting these conference papers.  Some researchers may have even had someone in Brazil contact them for a copy of their paper.  Why not put it in the KB?  The same goes for researchers all across the globe – why not make those conference papers easier to access!  Find out more about the Libraries’ conference archiving and publishing services.

Engineering Undergrad Posters – Headed Your Way

Ever go to an event and end up creating work for yourself – and others?  Well, just that happened to me just over a year ago.

I was invited to view the student posters for CETI (CERCS for Enterprise Transformation and Innovation) student projects.  These were some very interesting projects – one of which I even referred to a colleague in preservation.  Eventually, a thought popped into my head – “Knowledge Bank!”

Undergrads have been contributing items like honors theses to the KB for some time, and I thought these items would be great to put in there as well.  The posters show major research projects these students worked on.  They also highlight Ohio State’s work with industry (companies and government agencies) from around the world.  The students should be proud of this work and  may want to point to it for years to come.

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The Ohio Journal of Science Moves to Open Access

Late on a Friday afternoon in January, I got an e-mail message from Dr. Lynn Elfner, CEO of the Ohio Academy of Science and Acting Editor of The Ohio Journal of Science. Lynn has been an enthusiastic and long-time supporter of the digital archive of OJS in Knowledge Bank. I knew that he was interested in digital publishing, but I wasn’t expecting the great news that had just dropped into my inbox:

By unanimous vote on December 17, 2012, the Executive Committee approved moving The Ohio Journal of Science to a hybrid model: Rapid publication, Open Access online articles plus an annual, single printed volume and an April Annual Meeting Program Abstracts issue in print and online.

open-access-logoAttached to his message was a statement for subscribers bearing the familiar orange Open Access logo. I have been involved with Open Access Week activities on campus in the past, so reading this statement describing the logic behind the decision gave me goosebumps — the good kind. With such a long history of promoting science and science education in Ohio, it is no real surprise that the Academy chose to move in this direction.

Under a handful of titles, The Ohio Journal of Science has been publishing peer-reviewed articles in natural science, engineering, technology, and education for well over 100 years. Since 2006, OJS has been available to the world through Knowledge Bank. Before, the most recently published volumes were held back for two years. Now, articles will be transferred to KB and made available as soon as they are approved in page form.

So what will this mean for authors, researchers, and students? Articles from OJS have been included in major subscription-based indexing/abstracting databases for many years, but articles in Knowledge Bank are also discoverable through Google/Google Scholar. For the authors, fewer barriers to access will mean more readers for their work. Since 2008, more than 3.6 million OJS articles have been downloaded from KB by readers in more than 150 countries. Without a doubt, the audience is out there.

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