Tag: publishing (page 1 of 2)

Articles of Interest: July-December 2016

This post highlights articles published in the second half of 2016 with a focus on copyright, especially as it pertains to libraries, higher education, and scholarly communication. Links to the full-text articles are provided when available; [OSU full-text] links will connect authenticated users through The Ohio State University Libraries, while [OA full-text] links point to an open access version of the article that should be available to all users.

Did we miss an interesting article? Please share the citation!

Copyright

Bailey, L. (2016). How Copyright Law is Promoting Cultural Amnesia. Copyright & New Media Law20(2), 1-5. [OSU full text]

Kristof, C. (2016). Data and Copyright. Bulletin Of The Association For Information Science & Technology42(6), 20-22. [OA full text]

Matulionyte, R. (2016). 10 years for Google Books and Europeana: copyright law lessons that the EU could learn from the USA. International Journal Of Law & Information Technology24(1), 44-71. doi:10.1093/ijlit/eav018 [OA full text]

Menard, G. (2016). Copyright, digital sharing, and the liberal order: sociolegal constructions of intellectual property in the era of mass digitization. Information, Communication & Society19(8), 1061-1076. doi:10.1080/1369118X.2015.1069872. [OSU full text]

Price, D. (2016). Stop Using Our Songs!. Copyright & New Media Law20(3), 5-9. [OSU full text]

Reymond, M. J. (2016). Lenz v Universal Music Corp : Much ado about nothing? International Journal Of Law & Information Technology24(2), 119-127. doi:10.1093/ijlit/eav021 [OA full text]

Tehranian, J. (2016). Constitutionalizing Infringement: Balancing Copyright and Free Speech. Copyright & New Media Law20(3), 1-4. [OSU full text]

Copyright Education

Estell, A., & Saunders, L. (2016). Librarian Copyright Literacy: Self-Reported Copyright Knowledge Among Information Professionals in the United States. Public Services Quarterly12(3), 214-227. doi:10.1080/15228959.2016.1184997 [OA full text]

Jaszi, P., Remington, M., Ivins, O., & Dyas-Correia, S. (2016). Copyright and Intellectual Property: What You Need to Know. Serials Librarian70(1-4), 34-43. [OA full text]

Libraries

Ensign, D. (2016). What is Kirtsaeng and Why You Should Care. Kentucky Libraries80(3), 27-28. [OSU full text]

farrelly, d. (2016). VHS Copyright and Due Diligence. Library Journal141(20), 16. [OSU full text] / [OA full text]

Miller, R., & Homol, L. (2016). Building an Online Curriculum Based on OERs: The Library’s Role. Journal Of Library & Information Services In Distance Learning103(3/4), 349-359. doi:10.1080/1533290X.2016.1223957 [OSU full text]

Peet, L. (2016). Sci-Hub Sparks Critique of Librarian. Library Journal141(15), 14-17. [OSU full text] / [OA full text]

Publishing & Scholarly Communication

Bennett, L., & Flanagan, D. (2016). Measuring the impact of digitized theses: a case study from the London School of Economics. Insights: The UKSG Journal29(2), 111-119. doi:10.1629/uksg.300 [OSU full text] / [OA full text]

Laakso, M., & Lindman, J. (2016). Journal copyright restrictions and actual open access availability: a study of articles published in eight top information systems journals (2010-2014). Scientometrics109(2), 1167-1189. doi:10.1007/s11192-016-2078-z [OA full text]

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By Maria Scheid, Rights Management Specialist at the Copyright Resources Center, The Ohio State University Libraries

 

How to Negotiate a Publication Agreement

Dealing with a publisher may be intimidating, but a little work at the beginning of the publishing journey can eliminate work later.  A publication agreement spells out what rights are being requested via transfer or license from the copyright holder to the publisher.  The rights granted to a publisher can impact your future rights in your work.  If you would like to distribute copies of your work or even reuse it as part of future research, instruction, or professional development, then you may need to negotiate with your publisher.  To get ready for those negotiations, read on!

 

#1 – Educate yourself

Knowing your rights as an author under U.S. copyright law can help you understand the strength of your position when negotiating your publication agreement.  The bundle of rights encompassed by the word “copyright” goes far beyond just making copies of a work and includes the rights to:  reproduce the work, prepare derivative works, distribute the work, publicly perform the work, and publicly display the work.  To get educated and know your rights, we recommend starting with the Copyright Basics and Author’s Rights pages of our website.  They will give you an overview of what copyright is and is not and provide links to additional information.

 

#2 – Know what you want

The second step is knowing what rights you would like to keep.  Many publishers prefer a complete transfer of copyright or an exclusive license.  This allows the publisher to use the work however they deem necessary for publication.  Do you want to share your work when teaching courses?  Do you want to retain the right to translate your work into other languages, or turn it into a movie?  A copyright transfer means that the author, now former copyright holder, may be contractually bound in how they may or may not reuse the work.  Additionally, they may not be able to use the work without a statutory exception or permission from the publisher. Think about how you might use your work in the future, and what rights you should keep to allow those activities.  Then, move on to the next step.

 

#3 – Read your contract

Read your publishing agreement.  While there are any number of variations on publication rights, there are some that publishers typically use.  The three examples below are prevalent among academic publishers.  They are: (i) a complete transfer of copyright to the publisher; (ii) a complete transfer of copyright to the publisher, with an immediate license granted to the author; and (iii) a license given to the publisher, with the author retaining copyright.

 

3A – Transfer of Copyright

This is the most restrictive publishing agreement: You give up your copyright entirely.  The American Medical Association (AMA) requests this type of transfer in a publishing agreement for their journals and newsletters.  The agreement transfers the copyright in a work, in its entirety, to the AMA using the following language:

I hereby transfer, assign, or otherwise convey all copyright ownership, including any and all rights incidental thereto, exclusively to the AMA….

After signing such an agreement, you would be very limited in what you could do with your work.  You would not be able to make copies of your work for teaching or give a reading from your work without permission from the publisher or a statutory copyright exemption.

 

3B – Transfer of Copyright, with License to Author

Some publication agreements transfer copyright in its entirety to the publisher and immediately grant the author limited license(s) to use the work in specific ways.  The American Library Association (ALA) uses this model in a Copyright Assignment Agreement.  After using language similar to that in 3A to obtain full copyright from the author, the ALA goes on to provide the author a limited license:

Publisher hereby grants Author a royalty-free, limited license for the following purposes, provided the Work is always identified as having first been published by Publisher:

  • The right to make and distribute copies of all or part of the Work for use in teaching; …
  • The right to make oral presentations of material from the Work; …

If the uses allowed by the publication agreement cover all the ways you foresee using your work, then this agreement may work for you.

 

3C – Publisher Receives a License, Author Retains Copyright

If the language in your publishing agreement isn’t asking for a complete copyright transfer, it is likely asking you to give the publisher a license.  The Journal of Machine Learning Research (JMLR) requests a license in order to publish accepted articles in the journal.  The pertinent language in their “Nonexclusive Publication Agreement” is below:

…we need from every author whose work is to appear in JMLR certain nonexclusive licenses…. You hereby give to MIT Press the right to be the first publisher of the article in print form…. You hereby give to the Sponsor the right to be the first publisher of the article in electronic form.

MIT Press is asking for a nonexclusive[1] license, which means that you can exercise your rights as copyright owner without asking for permission from JMLR.   Be prepared to inform any subsequent publishers about prior publications.

 

#4 – Negotiations

Based on the type of publication agreement you received, you may have to adjust your expectations of what can be negotiated.  A publisher requesting a copyright transfer is less likely to allow an author to keep copyright and grant the publisher a limited license.  When setting your expectations, it may be helpful to ask others who have worked with your publisher about their experiences.  This is particularly true if they tried, successfully or not, to negotiate their agreement. Some Universities have created resources to help authors negotiate their rights.  In particular, the Universities of the Big 10 Academic Alliance have created an Addendum that authors can use when negotiating with their publisher.  This addendum works to preserve rights that academic authors commonly wish to keep, all of which look towards removing restrictions from the flow of information and allowing a freer exchange of ideas.

 

#5 – Make all edits/changes in writing

Whenever copyright is transferred, it must be in writing and signed.  One small exception is that a nonexclusive license does not require a signature.  In addition, it is recommended that you keep records of your negotiations with the publisher.  Note the date you send your request for modification, how you send it (email, postal service, inter-office mail), when you get a response, and of course what the response is.  An email will fulfill the requirement for a writing, so be sure to always review your emails before you hit “send”.  If you orally negotiate a change in your publication agreement, get those changes in writing.  Take extensive notes, summarize your notes in an email, and send it to the publisher with a request that they confirm the information is correct.

 

Conclusion

The opportunity to negotiate is always available.  The publisher may not agree to all of your requests, but asking can ensure that you retain important rights in your work and save you from hassle down the road.  Knowing your rights, and which of those rights a publisher is requesting, can help assess a publication agreement and determine what changes, if any, you would like to make.  Taking copious notes, and always getting any changes to a publication agreement in writing, will make your negotiations enforceable and truly protect your ability to use your work.

If there is any confusion over what a publication agreement is requesting, check out Phrases to Look for in Publisher Copyright Agreement Forms.  For questions on your rights or your publication agreement, feel free to reach out to the Copyright Resources Center by posting a comment here on the blog, tweeting at us (@OSUCopyright), or sending us an email.

Have you negotiated a publication agreement?  Were you successful in getting the changes you requested?  Let us know what your experience was like by leaving us a comment!

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By Marley C. Nelson, Rights Management Specialist, and Sandra A. Enimil, Head of the Copyright Resources Center, The Ohio State University Libraries.

 

[1] A nonexclusive license is a contract that allows a copyright owner to grant another party the ability to exercise one of the bundle of rights contained in copyright, while retaining the ability to simultaneously exercise that right.  These licenses are at times given for a limited length of time.  An exclusive license grants another party the ability to exercise one or all of the rights contained in copyright, but does not allow the copyright owner to simultaneously exercise those rights.  An unlimited exclusive license has little, aside from its name, to distinguish it from a full transfer of copyright.

Open Access Week 2016

To kick off this year’s Open Access Week, we are sharing information on open access workshops offered by The Ohio State University Libraries throughout the week. This blog post first appeared on the Research Commons blog.

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Open Access Week Logo

Open Access Week 2016 by SPARC is licensed under CC-BY 4.0 (cropped).

 

Next week, October 24-30, 2016, we celebrate the 9th International Open Access Week. This year’s theme is “Open in Action” and will highlight ideas for taking action to open research and scholarship.

Open Access Week is a yearly global event to spread awareness of Open Access, a movement that supports free and immediate access to research. The Open Access movement seeks to maximize the impact and accessibility of published research through the removal of financial and use restrictions placed on research. Interested in learning more about Open Access? Peter Suber’s “Open Access Overview” provides a great summary of the Open Access movement and the different forms and vehicles through which Open Access research may be shared.

Join us at the Research Commons and Thompson Library to celebrate Open Access by attending an OA workshop offered by The Ohio State University Libraries next week:

 

Open Access: Know Your Rights, Share Your Research

This workshop will cover the basics of copyright and open access, including understanding your rights as an author, sharing your research to a broader audience, and publishing in open access journals. Presented in conjunction with International Open Access Week, this workshop will feature speakers from the University Libraries’ Copyright Resources Center and Publishing and Repository Services department. Light refreshments will be provided, and our presenters will be available afterward for consultations.

Light refreshments will be provided, and our presenters will be available afterward for consultations.
When: Tuesday, October 25, 11:00am – 12:30pm
Where: Research Commons, 3rd floor of the 18th Avenue Library

Register: go.osu.edu/oa-workshop

 

Open Access Week: Creative Commons

Please join the University Libraries’ Copyright Resources Center for a workshop on Creative Commons (CC). The session will introduce CC and explore how CC licenses benefit creators and users of licensed material. These licenses contribute to affordability and the development and use of Open Educational Resources, a particularly relevant topic for us in light of the university-wide focus on affordable learning. Bring your questions!

When: Wednesday, October 26, 10:00 am-11:30 am

Where: Thompson Library, Room 165

RSVP: http://go.osu.edu/oa-creativecommons

 

Open Data: A Panel Discussion

Curious about Open Data? Want to know more about where to find Open Data to use in your own research, or how to make your data open to comply with funding agency mandates? Have your top concerns and questions addressed by a group of campus experts – all who are interested in Open Data are welcome!

This event is part of Data Analytics Month @ Ohio State. Learn more at: go.osu.edu/dataanalyticsmonth.

 

When: Wednesday, October 26, 2:00 – 3:30pm
Where: Research Commons, 3rd floor of 18th Avenue Library

Register: go.osu.edu/opendata-panel

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By Maria Scheid, Rights Management Specialist at the Copyright Resources Center, The Ohio State University Libraries

Articles of Interest: January-June 2016

This post highlights articles published in the first half of 2016 with a focus on copyright, especially as it pertains to libraries, higher education, and scholarly communication. Links to the full-text articles are provided when available; [OSU full-text] links will connect authenticated users through The Ohio State University Libraries, while [OA full-text] links point to an open access version of the article that should be available to all users.

Did we miss an interesting article? Please share the citation in the comments!

Copyright

Albanese, A. (2016). Google case ends, but copyright fight goes on. Publishers Weekly263(17), 4-6. [OSU full text] / [OA full text]

Aufderheide, P., & Sinnreich, A. (2016). Documentarians, fair use, and free expression: Changes in copyright attitudes and actions with access to best practices. Information, Communication & Society19(2), 178-187. doi:10.1080/1369118X.2015.1050050 [OSU full text]

Hellyer, P. (2016). Who owns this article? Applying copyright’s work-made-for-hire doctrine to librarians’ scholarship. Law Library Journal, 108(1), 33-54. [OSU full text] / [OA full text]

Hess, J., Nann, A., & Riddle, K. (2016) Navigating OER: The library’s role in bringing OER to campus. The Serials Librarian, 70:1-4, 128-134. doi:10.1080/0361526X.2016.1153326 [OSU full text]

Pike, G. H. (2016). Trans-Pacific Partnership: The devil in the details. Information Today33(1), 1-25. [OSU full text]

Libraries

Banks, M. (2016). What Sci-Hub is and why it matters. American Libraries47(6), 46-48. [OSU full text]

Dygert, C., & Barrett, H. (2016) Building your licensing and negotiation skills toolkit. The Serials Librarian, 70:1-4, 333-342. doi: 10.1080/0361526X.2016.1157008 [OSU full text]

Enis, M. (2016). Please rewind. Library Journal141(10), 45-47. [OSU full text]

Finley, T. K. (2016). The impact of 3D printing services on library stakeholders: A case study. Public Services Quarterly, 12(2), 152-163. doi:10.1080/15228959.2016.1160808 [OSU full text]

Graham, R. G. (2016). An Evidence-Informed Picture of Course-Related Copying. College & Research Libraries77(3), 335-358. [OSU full text] / [OA full text]

Lipinski, T. A., & Chamberlain Kritikos, K. (2016). Copyright reform and the library and patron use of non-text or mixed-text grey literature: A comparative analysis of approaches and opportunities for change. Grey Journal (TGJ), 12(2), 67-81. [OSU full text]

Luo, L., & Trott, B. (2016). Ethical issues in reference: An in-depth view from the librarians’ perspective. Reference & User Services Quarterly55(3), 189-198. [OSU full text] / [OA full text]

Nilsson, I. (2016). Developing new copyright services in academic libraries. Insights: The UKSG Journal29(1), 78-83. doi:10.1629/uksg.276 [OSU full text] / [OA full text]

Publishing & Scholarly Communication

Beard, R. M. (2016). An investigation of graduate student knowledge and usage of open-access journals. Journal of Electronic Resources Librarianship28(1), 25-32. doi:10.1080/1941126X.2016.1130453 [OSU full text]

Bennett, L., & Flanagan, D. (2016). Measuring the impact of digitized theses: A case study from the London School of Economics. Insights: The UKSG Journal29(2), 111-119. doi:10.1629/uksg.300 [OSU full text] / [OA full text]

Schlosser, M., (2016). Write up! A study of copyright information on library-published journals. Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication. 4, p.eP2110. doi:10.7710/2162-3309.2110 [OA full text]

Sims, N. N. (2016). My unpublished research was scooped? College & Research Libraries News77(6), 296-301. [OSU full text] / [OA full text]

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By Maria Scheid, Rights Management Specialist at the Copyright Resources Center, The Ohio State University Libraries

Articles of Interest: July-December 2015

This post highlights articles published in the second half of 2015 with a focus on copyright, especially as it pertains to libraries, higher education, and scholarly communication. Links to the full-text articles are provided when available; [OSU full-text] links will connect authenticated users through The Ohio State University Libraries, while [OA full-text] links point to an open access version of the article that should be available to all users.

Did we miss an interesting article? Please share the citation in the comments!

Copyright

Datig, I., & Russell, B. (2015). “The fruits of intellectual labor”: International student views of intellectual property. College & Research Libraries76(6), 811-830 [OA full text] [OSU full text]

Franklin, T. (2015). Copyright and fair use in the digital age. EContent38(7), 8-10. [OSU full-text]

Gordon-Murnane, L. (2015). Copyright tools for a digitized, collaborative culture. Online Searcher39(6), 28-52. [OSU full-text]

Muriel-Torrado, E., & Fernández-Molina, J. (2015). Creation and use of intellectual works in the academic environment: Students’ knowledge about copyright and copyleft. Journal of Academic Librarianship41(4), 441-448. [OSU full-text] ­­­­

Owen, L. (2015). Fair dealing: A concept in UK copyright law. Learned Publishing28(3), 229-231. doi:10.1087/20150309 [OSU full-text]

Shan, L. (2015). Conditional access to music: Reducing copyright infringement without restricting cloud sharing. International Journal of Law & Information Technology23(3), 235-260. doi:10.1093/ijlit/eav008 [OA full-text]

Smith, D. (2015). Finding parents for orphan works: Using genealogical methods to locate heirs for obtaining copyright permissions. Journal of Academic Librarianship41(3), 280-284. [OSU full-text]

Libraries

Christou, C. (2015). Mass digitization and copyright. Information Today32(10), Cover-29. (Periodical) [OSU full-text]

Kawooya, D. k., Veverka, A. a., & Lipinski, T. t. (2015). The copyright librarian: A study of advertising trends for the period 2006–2013. Journal of Academic Librarianship41(3), 341-349. [OSU full-text]

Riley-Reid, T. D. (2015). The hidden cost of digitization – things to consider. Collection Building, 34(3), 89-93. doi:10.1108/CB-01-2015-0001 [OSU full-text]

Schmidt, L., & English, M. (2015). Copyright instruction in LIS programs: Report of a survey of standards in the U.S.A. Journal of Academic Librarianship41(6), 736-743. doi:10.1016/j.acalib.2015.08.004 [OSU full-text]

Wang, Y., & Yang, X. (2015). Libraries’ positions on copyright: A comparative analysis between Japan and China. Journal of Librarianship & Information Science47(3), 216-225. [OSU full-text]/[OA full-text]

Publishing & Scholarly Communication

Quinn, M. M. (2015). Open access in scholarly publishing: Embracing principles and avoiding pitfalls. Serials Librarian69(1), 58-69. [OSU full-text]

Sims, N. (2015). It’s all the same to me! Copyright, contracts, and publisher self-archiving policies. College & Research Libraries News76(11), 578-581. [OA full-text] / [OSU full-text]

Wassom, B. (2015). Navigating the rights and risks in social reading. Publishing Research Quarterly31(3), 215-219. doi:10.1007/s12109-015-9415-6 [OSU full-text]

Wilson, V. v. (2015). The open access conundrum. Evidence Based Library & Information Practice10(3), 116-118. [OSU full text] (From recurring Research in Practice column)

Legislation & Policy Developments

Christou, C. (2015). Copyright independence. Information Today32(7), 1-25. [OSU full-text]

Epperson, B. (2015). Copyright & fair use. ARSC Journal46(2), 293-300. [OSU full-text] (Recurring column in non-traditional academic journal)

Stannard, E. (2015). A copyright snapshot: The impact of new copyright legislation on information professionals. Legal Information Management15(4), 233-239. [OSU full text]

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By Maria Scheid, Rights Management Specialist at the Copyright Resources Center, The Ohio State University Libraries

Copyright in the Libraries: Fine Arts Library

Copyright touches many library services because we collect, share and loan original works fixed in a wide variety of tangible media. The Copyright Resources Center conducted a series of informational interviews with faculty and staff from various areas of The OSU Libraries to discuss the ways in which they engage with copyright issues. This blog series documents those conversations, and highlights how copyright law helps to shape services provided by the Libraries. See all available posts in the series here.

Profile photo of Sarah Falls

Sarah Falls, Fine Arts Librarian

Sarah Falls, Assistant Professor, is the Head of the Fine Arts Library at OSU, and as Fine Arts Librarian, Sarah supports the Departments of DesignArt, History of Art, Arts Administration, Education and Policy, and the Advanced Computing Center for the Arts and Design. I met with Sarah to discuss copyright and the arts, and the unique influence copyright exerts on these particular disciplines.

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Copyright in the Libraries: Digital Content Services (Part 1)

Copyright touches many library services because we collect, share and loan original works fixed in a wide variety of tangible media. The Copyright Resources Center conducted a series of informational interviews with faculty and staff from various areas of The Ohio State University Libraries to discuss the ways in which they engage with copyright issues. This blog series documents those conversations, and highlights how copyright law helps to shape services provided by the Libraries. See all available posts in the series here.

Photo of Melanie Schlosser

Melanie Schlosser, Digital Publishing Librarian

Digital Content Services at The OSU Libraries include the Libraries’ Publishing Program and the Knowledge Bank, OSU’s institutional repository (this post focuses on the Libraries’ Publishing Program, while Digital Content Services: Part 2 will discuss the Knowledge Bank). Melanie Schlosser (Digital Publishing Librarian) and Maureen Walsh (Institutional Repository Services Librarian) are interim co-heads of Digital Content Services; Melanie and Maureen met with me to discuss how copyright affects their work in the publishing program and the institutional repository. In fact, they observed that not a day goes by when they aren’t thinking about copyright, as they are constantly working with copyrighted materials and “someone else’s content.”

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The Research Commons Needs Your Stories!

Predatory publishers, solicitation scams, and unethical publishing practices — the Research Commons needs your stories!

This year during International Open Access Week (October 19-25), the Research Commons, in partnership with the Libraries’ Publishing Program and the Copyright Resources Center, will host a panel discussion about the potentials and pitfalls of Open Access publishing.

As we prepare, we invite OSU faculty, postdocs, and graduate students to share your experiences with unscrupulous publishers and questionable publishing practices. We will use your experiences to inform our program, and may ask your permission to share especially relevant stories more widely.

Please email your story to Melanie Schlosser (schlosser.40@osu.edu) by September 1st.

Program organizers: Josh Sadvari (Research Commons Program Manager), Sandra Enimil (Head, Copyright Resources Center), and Melanie Schlosser (Digital Publishing Librarian).

 

This announcement first appeared on the Research Commons blog.

Articles of interest: July-December 2014

This post highlights articles published in the last six months with a focus on copyright, especially as it pertains to libraries, higher education, and scholarly communication. Links to the full-text articles are provided when available; [OSU full-text] links will connect authenticated users through The Ohio State University Libraries, while [OA full-text] links point to an open access version of the article that should be available to all users.

Did we miss an interesting article? Please share the citation in the comments!

Copyright

Abdenour, J. (2014). Documenting fair use: Has the statement of best practices loosened the fair use reins for documentary filmmakers? Communication Law & Policy19(3), 367-398. [OSU full-text]

Collins, S. (2014). YouTube and limitations of fair use in remix videos. Journal of Media Practice, 15(2), 92-106. [OSU full-text]

Cowart, T. W., Gershuny, P., & Hawk, G. B. (2014). A survey of state copyright law. Southern Law Journal24(2), 311-335. [OSU full-text]

Glushko, R., Graham, R., Ludbrook, A., & Martin, H. (2014). Understanding “large and liberal” in the context of higher education. Feliciter60(4), 14-21. [OSU full-text]

Heald, P. J. (2014). How copyright keeps works disappeared. Journal of Empirical Legal Studies11(4), 829-866. [OSU full-text]

Hua, J. J. (2014). Construction of digital commons and exploration of public domain. Journal of International Commercial Law & Technology, 9(3), 148-164. [OA full-text] / [OSU full-text]

Olson, K. K. (2014). The future of fair use. Communication Law & Policy19(4), 417-432. [OSU full-text]

Libraries

Anderson, R. (2014). Asserting rights we don’t have. Library Journal139(15), 12. [OA full-text]

Behnk, R. b., Georgi, K., Granzow, R., & Atze, L. (2014). Testing the HathiTrust copyright search protocol in Germany: A pilot project on procedures and resources. D-Lib Magazine20(9/10), 1. [OA full-text]

Dougan, K. (2014). “YouTube has changed everything”? Music faculty, librarians, and their use and perceptions of YouTube. College & Research Libraries75(4), 575-589. [OA full-text]

King, R. (2014). House of Cards: The Academic Library Media Center in the Era of Streaming Video. Serials Librarian67(3), 289-306. [OSU full-text]

McKinnon, L. l., & Helge, K. S. (2014). Copyright, open access and library instruction. Library Hi Tech News31(10), 13-16. [OSU full-text]

Owen, V. (2014). The librarian’s role in the interpretation of copyright law: Acting in the public interest. Feliciter60(5), 8-12. [OSU full-text]

Rodriguez, J. E., Greer, K., & Shipman, B. (2014). Copyright and you: Copyright instruction for college students in the digital age. Journal of Academic Librarianship40(5), 486-491. [OSU full-text]

Schopfel, J., Chaudiron, S., Jacquemin, B., Prost, H., Severo, M., & Thiault, F. (2014). Open access to research data in electronic theses and dissertations: An overview. Library Hi Tech32(4), 612-627. [OSU full-text]

Soltau, C., & Farrell, A. (2014). Copyright and the Canadian for-profit library. Feliciter60(6), 9-14. [OSU full-text]

Williams, L. A., Fox, L. M., Roeder, C., & Hunter, L. (2014). Negotiating a text mining license for faculty researchers. Information Technology & Libraries33(3), 5-21. [OA full-text]

Publishing & scholarly communication

Dawson, D. D. (2014). The scholarly communications needs of faculty: An evidence based foundation for the development of library services. Evidence Based Library & Information Practice, 9(4), 4-28. [OA full-text]

Dutta, G., & Paul, D. (2014). Awareness on institutional repositories-related issues by faculty of University of Calcutta. DESIDOC Journal of Library & Information Technology34(4), 293-297. doi:10.14429/djlit.34.5138 [OSU full-text]

Rahmatian, A. (2014). Make the butterflies fly in formation? Management of copyright created by academics in UK universities. Legal Studies, 34(4), 709-735. [OSU full-text]

 

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By Jessica Meindertsma, Rights Management Specialist at the Copyright Resources Center, The Ohio State University Libraries

Articles of interest: January-June 2014

This post highlights citations for recent scholarly articles with a focus on copyright, especially as it pertains to libraries, higher education, and scholarly communication. Articles were selected according to the following criteria: scholarly/peer-reviewed, English language, published within the past six months, and subject matter pertaining to copyright and libraries, higher education, or scholarly communication. Links to the full-text articles are provided when available; [OSU full text] links will connect authenticated users through The Ohio State University Libraries, while [OA full text] links point to an open access version of the article that should be available to all users.

Did we miss an interesting article? Please share the citation in the comments!

Library services

Crews, K. D. (2014). Copyright and universities: Legal compliance or advancement of scholarship? The growth of copyright. IPRinfo Magazine, 2, 14-15. [OA full text]

Gilliland, A. T., & Bradigan, P. S. (2014). Copyright information queries in the health sciences: trends and implications from the Ohio State University. Journal Of The Medical Library Association102(2), 114-117. doi:10.3163/1536-5050.102.2.011 [OSU full text]

Gore, H. (2014). Massive open online courses (MOOCs) and their impact on academic library services: Exploring the issues and challenges. New Review of Academic Librarianship20(1), 4-28. doi:10.1080/13614533.2013.851609 [OA full text]

Myers, C. S. (2014). Answering copyright questions at the reference desk: A guide for academic librarians. Reference Librarian55(1), 49-73. doi:10.1080/02763877.2014.856260 [OSU full text]

Library policies & procedures

Bowen, T., Calter, M., Lee, F., & Parang, E. (2014). Using computing power to replace lawyers: Advances in licensing and access. Serials Librarian66(1-4), 232-240. doi:10.1080/0361526X.2014.881221 [OSU full text]

Clark, A., & Chawner, B. (2014). Enclosing the public domain: The restriction of public domain books in a digital environment. First Monday19(6), 6. doi:10.5210/fm.v19i6.4975 [OA full text]

Dryden, J. (2014). The role of copyright in selection for digitization. American Archivist77(1), 64-95. [OA full text]

Dygert, C., & Langendorfer, J. M. (2014). Fundamentals of e-resource licensing. Serials Librarian66(1-4), 289-297. doi:10.1080/0361526X.2014.881236 [OSU full text]

Simon, J. C. (2014). E-book purchasing best practices for academic libraries. Journal of Electronic Resources Librarianship26(1), 68-77. doi:10.1080/1941126X.2014.878640 [OSU full text]

Legislation

Michael, G. J. (2014). Politics and Rulemaking at the Copyright Office. Journal of Information Technology & Politics11(1), 64-81. doi:10.1080/19331681.2013.872073 [OSU full text]

Muhammad Waris, B. (2014). National Library of Pakistan as Legal Depository. Pakistan Library & Information Science Journal45(1), 18-23. [OSU full text]

Nsibirwa, Z., Hoskins, R., & Stilwell, C. (2014). Building the South African nation through legal deposit: The impact of legislation on preservation of digital materials. African Journal of Library, Archives & Information Science24(1), 53-65. [OSU full text]

Publishing & scholarly communication

Björk, B., Laakso, M., Welling, P., & Paetau, P. (2014). Anatomy of green open access. Journal of the Association for Information Science & Technology65(2), 237-250. doi:10.1002/asi.22963 [OA full text]

Cheng, W., Ren, S., & Rousseau, R. (2014). Digital publishing and China’s core scientific journals: A position paper. Scientometrics98(1), 11-22. doi:10.1007/s11192-012-0873-8 [OA full text]

Ludewig, K. (2014). MedOANet: The Copyright and OA Landscape in Mediterranean Europe. Liber Quarterly: The Journal of European Research Libraries23(3), 187-200. [OA full text]

Lwoga, E., & Questier, F. (2014). Faculty adoption and usage behaviour of open access scholarly communication in health science universities. New Library World115(3/4), 116-139. doi:10.1108/NLW-01-2014-0006 [OSU full text]

Melero, R. R., Rodríguez-Gairín, J. M., Abad-García, F. F., & Abadal, E. E. (2014). Journal author rights and self-archiving: The case of Spanish journals. Learned Publishing27(2), 107-120. doi:10.1087/20140205 [OSU full text]

Updated 8/8/2014 with K. D. Crews article. 

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By Jessica Meindertsma, Rights Management Specialist at the Copyright Resources Center, The Ohio State University Libraries

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