Category: New Acquisitions (page 1 of 3)

Jack Ziegler Collection Donated to OSU Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum

 

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Drawing for The Essential Jack Ziegler, published in 2007.

 
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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: December 21, 2016

Jack Ziegler Collection Donated to The Ohio State University Libraries’
Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum 

 

COLUMBUS— Renowned cartoonist Jack Ziegler has donated his personal collection of original art and archival materials to the Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum (BICLM). Ziegler is best known for his contributions to The New Yorker; since 1974, the magazine has published over 1,500 of his cartoons. His work has also appeared in eight collections, the children’s book Mr. Knocky, and the anthology The Essential Jack Ziegler, which was published in 2000.

This collection spans half a century of cartooning, from the sketchbooks of a budding artist and early days at The New Yorker to recent work. Ziegler says about his donation, “It was important to me to locate a place that would properly preserve all my original published cartoon art from The New Yorker magazine, et al., along with related miscellany, for future scholars and the general public or other interested parties to peruse.” When considering where to house his artwork permanently, Ziegler visited the BICLM.

“Jenny Robb and Wendy Pflug were kind enough to give me the grand tour and I was greatly impressed with the care and seriousness of their and OSU’s approach,” he says, “so impressed in fact that I decided then and there to donate my archives.”

The donation includes 4,148 original drawings, contracts and paperwork, personal correspondence and journals, and manuscripts for an unpublished memoir. “Since I am still a practicing cartoonist, much of my unpublished (as well as some published) material is still here for possible use in my own future projects,” Ziegler says, “and going through my archives for eventual inclusion at OSU is an ongoing project.”

“We are so pleased to have this comprehensive collection of original cartoons, roughs, and papers from Jack Ziegler’s impressive and prolific career,” says curator Jenny Robb of the collection. “He is a truly talented and funny cartoonist who brought a unique style and sensibility to the New Yorker starting in the 1970s.  Because of this generous gift, Jack’s archives will be available for future study and exhibition.”

Our curator Jenny Robb with Jack Ziegler during a visit to the museum galleries.

Our curator Jenny Robb with Jack Ziegler during a visit to the museum galleries.

 

Click images to enlarge:

 

About the Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum:  The BICLM is one of The Ohio State University Libraries’ special collections. Its primary mission is to develop a comprehensive research collection of materials documenting American printed cartoon art (editorial cartoons, comic strips, comic books, graphic novels, sports cartoons, and magazine cartoons) and to provide access to these collections.  The BICLM recently moved into its newly-renovated 30,000 sq. ft. facility that includes a museum with three exhibition galleries, a reading room for researchers and a state-of-the-art collections storage space.  The library reading room is open Monday-Friday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. The Museum is open Tuesday-Sunday from 1 – 5 p.m.  See http://cartoons.osu.edu/ for further information.

The Ohio State University Libraries

Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum
Contact: Caitlin McGurk
Sullivant Hall
1813 N. High St
Columbus, OH 43210

614-292-0538 Phone
614-292-9101 Fax

Found in the Collection: Etta Hulme!

“I’m in this business to dispense opinions,” Etta Hulme once said in an interview, “and — if the job gets done right — to get people stirred up while keepin’ things on the funny side.” Best known for her editorial cartoons, Etta Hulme (1923-2014) was the chief cartoonist for the Fort Worth Star-Telegram for 36 years. She also served as President for the American Association of Editorial Cartoonists, and twice received the National Cartoonist Society award for Best Editorial Cartoonist. The BICLM recently acquired a collection of Hulme’s original artwork, sketches, correspondences, books, comics, and other belongings.

During her long and industrious career, Etta provided a consistent voice in cartooning. Her path wasn’t always easy; she was one of the only women to be hired as a full-time newspaper cartoonist, and was frequently carped for her boldly liberal views in a conservative Texan town. Etta laughed off criticism and even threats; her endless wit and terrific determination are best illustrated by her daily cartoons. Among the 33 sketches are a few that feature one of her popular targets, the IRS:

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Sketches for editorial cartoons. Dates unknown

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Sketches for editorial cartoons. Dates unknown

Etta’s cartooning long pre-dates her political strips. These are the artifacts of a long and varied career, beginning with Disney; the animation studios hired her during World War II, when restrictions on hiring women were temporarily lifted. During her early days working in animation, Etta earned her chops story-boarding, inventing characters, and cartooning for a kids’ audience.

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She submitted a number of storyboards to popular comic book publishers, many of which were turned down. Editors were often very candid with their criticism–letters like this one would have required a thick skin!

Rejection letter from Whitman Publishing Company, 1951

Rejection letter from Whitman Publishing Company, 1951

 

Eventually, in the late 1940s and early 1950s, Etta landed a regular job writing and drawing for “Red” Rabbit, a very popular kids’ comic. We found this fantastic photo in a box of her belongings—a group of kids in the early fifties, gathered around their favorite comic.

 

Photo of kids reading “Red” Rabbit circa early 1950s, with the caption “Yes sir, Mr. Laue, down here in Texas, Red Rabbit Comics are about all you ever see. Wherever you find five or six kids together, you’ll find two or three Red Rabbits.”

Photo of kids reading “Red” Rabbit circa early 1950s, with the caption “Yes sir, Mr. Laue, down here in Texas, Red Rabbit Comics are about all you ever see. Wherever you find five or six kids together, you’ll find two or three Red Rabbits.”

The “Mr. Laue” referred to in the caption is Charles “Chas” Laue, who was Etta’s editor. Etta and Chas had a friendly working relationship, and his letters were fond and informal, unlike previous editors’. Here’s an example of one such letter, in which Chas asks Etta for advertising advice:

 

Letter from Charles “Chas” Laue, March 22, 1951

Letter from Charles “Chas” Laue, March 22, 1951

Chas Laue was happy with a cover Etta (then Etta Parks) had drawn. Among a pile of original “Red” Rabbit covers are this sketch and final print, as well as some charming character sketches.

Sketch and final cover for “Red” Rabbit No. 22, September to October 1951

Sketch and final cover for “Red” Rabbit No. 22, September to October 1951

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Taking inspiration for both editorial cartoons and kids’ comics, Etta had a (heavily bookmarked!) collection of Cartoons Magazine, a World War I anthology of humor and politics, as well as these colorful comic books ranging from Krazy Kat to Korak.

 

A pile of thirteen Cartoons Magazine issues from 1913-1921

A pile of thirteen Cartoons Magazine issues from 1913-1921

 

Assortment of comic books from the early 1950s

Assortment of comic books from the early 1950s

Etta Hulme was a talented cartoonist and a fascinating person—this is just a small sample of her life and legacy. To learn more about Etta and her work:

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