From Woody's Couch

Our Playbook on OSU History

Category: People (page 1 of 49)

Gay Activism at OSU is Recognized in Early ’70s

The Ohio State University Archives would like to wish a happy Pride to all of our friends in the LGBTQ+ community! Pride is an annual month-long celebration and protest remembering the struggles of LGBTQ+ community both past and present. The tradition of Pride began on June 28, 1969, when a police raid on the Stonewall Inn, a gay bar in New York City, escalated into a riot against police abuses that lasted for days. Police raids on “gay spaces” were a common practice in the twentieth century, with many on the receiving end experiencing police misconduct in the forms of assault and humiliation tactics. With the Stonewall Riots came a new wave of movements dedicated to LGBTQ+ rights unlike those before.

‘The Lantern’, May 17, 1971.

The Ohio State University and the city of Columbus felt that wave. Organizations dedicated to promoting gay liberation and creating safe social spaces for gay students at OSU began to form and vocalize themselves. The Ohio State chapter of the Gay Liberation Front (GLF), which gained official recognition by the University in March of 1971, sponsored and organized many events in the summer of that same year. These included educational events, guest speakers, film screenings, organizational meetings, and, of course, social dances. Mass meetings were held regularly at Saint Stephens Episcopal Church on Woodruff Avenue, dances took place every Monday at the Newport Music Hall (then the Agora Ballroom), and a GLF sponsored event featuring activist Frank Kameny took place in the Ohio Union.

The Gay Activist Alliance featured in the 1973 Makio, page 255.

After succeeding the GLF in autumn of 1971, the Gay Activists Alliance (GAA) continued the task of organizing the gay community. In addition to providing social events such as dances, the GAA provided counseling services to individuals. By 1975 the dances held at the Ohio Union stopped due to frequent harassment, but the Alliance continued to operate its counseling services from its office in the Ohio Union. In a Lantern article from January 1975, Robert Smith, a sophomore, said, “People call just to hear another gay person’s voice. They may call and just hang up several times before they get the courage to say anything.” The counseling was intended to help gay individuals accept themselves, though severe and complex individual situations were often referred to outside counselors.

‘The Lantern’, January 26, 1972.

Additionally, the GAA, having been funded in part by the Undergraduate Student Government, also began publishing its own newsletter called the Columbus Gay Activist, in 1971. The publication caused some controversy the next year, however, when it was denied funding by the Office of Student Accounting. Fearing legal reprisal over an article in the October 11, 1972, issue of the Activist, University legal counsel Jacob E. Davis instructed the auditing office to deny funds, claiming the article, which was about anal sex, would have violated state and local obscenity laws. Affording the money to the GAA and its newsletter would have therefore opened the University open to lawsuits for the misuse of state funds, according to Davis. Although the Archives contains records of the Gay Activist Alliance meeting with then-University President Harold L. Enarson and then-Executive Vice President Edward Q. Moulton, it is not clear how this situation was resolved.

Although this history of LGBTQ+ activism on Ohio State’s campuses is greater than what has been presented here, it is important that we share what we can this Pride season. Stonewall occurred in New York City, but the LGBTQ+ community continues to exist everywhere.

Written by John Hooton

Happy Thanksgiving from the Archives

Written and assembled by Olivia Wood

Happy Thanksgiving!  To celebrate the most delicious time of the year, we’ve decided to post some pictures commemorating different types of feasts here at Ohio State ranging from the late 19th century up until the 21st century.  Enjoy!

 

A Food and Nutrition class in Hayes Hall preparing a meal, circa 1900.

 

A Food and Nutrition course holding a meal, 1950.

 

An Ohio State home economics class preparing a meal, 1895.

 

Two students sharing dessert, circa 1930.

 

A group of students sharing a snack of celery, crackers, and cigarettes…yum? Circa 1940.

 

Students and chefs with a dessert spread of cake and cookies, 1942.

 

Student-employee appreciation event hosted in the Oval with a feast of pizza and cake, 2000.

 

The International Party hosted by the Mother’s Club, 1954.

 

Two students toasting to each other, circa 1930.

 

An ox roast held at Ohio State, circa May 1916. An ox roast really isn’t actually roasted ox–it’s roast beef!

Bleeds Scarlet and Gray: Bartels turned passion for athletics into winning career as coach and educator

Written by Olivia A. Wood

After the recent passing in June of Dr. Robert “Bob” Louis Bartels, his family was kind enough to bring some of his material to the Archives that related to his career at OSU. When we looked at the material, we discovered that while Bartels was known to many as a head coach for Men’s Swimming and Diving, his impact on campus and the community was much greater than that. Bartels, born on November 14, 1928, was also a swimmer and professor at OSU, and he held many leadership roles in professional and community organizations.

Bob Bartels, 1950

Bartels stands at the edge of the pool, 1950

Bartels came to Ohio State University in the fall of 1947, ultimately receiving his Bachelor of Science degree in Education, with a major in Physical Education, in 1951.  He continued his graduate education at Ohio State, receiving his Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy degrees in 1952 and 1961, respectively.  Both degrees Bartels earned were in Education, with a focus in physical education.

During his undergraduate career, Bartels swam for The Ohio State University men’s swim team from 1949 until 1951.  Under the leadership of the legendary Coach Mike Peppe, Bartels and his teammates won three Big Ten and two national championship titles.  Along the way, he earned a Varsity “O” in swimming, and in 1949, Bartels was named as a first-team All-American “as one of the best breaststrokers in the country,” according to a Department of Athletics obituary.

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Bartels received a paddle from the 1963 men’s
swim team with all of their signatures on the back.

Having swum for Ohio State, Bartels went on to coaching at Kenyon College, Ohio University and The Ohio State University.  Bartels served as the freshman swimming coach at Ohio State while working towards his Master’s degree. Then, from 1952 until 1954, Bartels worked as the head swimming coach at Kenyon College, where he led his team to win the Ohio Conference Championship. (During that time, he also served as the Assistant Director of Athletics there.) Bartels maintained the same position, along with the appointment as tennis coach, during his time at Ohio University. Bartels returned in 1959 to Ohio State where he served as an assistant swimming coach under Peppe.  In 1962, under their guidance, the team won the national championship title.  Bartels took over as the head swimming coach after Peppe retired in 1963, and he coached the team until 1967.

Meanwhile, Bartels was building his academic career. While coaching at Ohio University, he was an Instructor and Assistant Professor of Physical Education.  After returning to OSU in 1959, Bartels served first as an Instructor, then as an Assistant, then Associate, then full Professor of Physical Education.  He also served as chairman of graduate studies for that department.

In 1980, he helped establish the Cardiac Rehabilitation Program, a joint venture of the Department of Health, Physical Education and Recreation, and the Student Health Center. In the program, heart attack victims learned to incorporate an exercise program into their recovery. It was a new concept at the time; previously, people who had suffered heart attacks were told to rest. But Bartels and his colleague, Prof. Edward L. Fox, concluded the heart, like any muscle, benefits from regular activity, so they created the program to teach survivors how to exercise successfully without creating more stress.

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Bartels and colleague, Edward L. Fox, demonstrate their cardiac rehabilitation equipment.

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Fox demonstrates how the cardiac rehabilitation equipment works.

During his professional career, Bartels published more than thirty academic publications and thirteen academic papers on that and other subjects related to physical education.

Bartels didn’t limit his professional contributions to teaching and coaching, though. From 1963 until 1986, Bartels served as the chairman of Safety Services for the Columbus Area Chapter of the American Red Cross. He also was elected as a member of the Commodore Longfellow Life Saving Society, a water safety program run by the American Red Cross.  In 1968 Bartels was elected to the Board of Directors of the College Swimming Coaches Association of America; he was elected as president in 1971. For his efforts, he received the “Distinguished Coach Award” in 1972 and the Honor Service Award for Service to Aquatic Sports in 1980, both from the Coaches Association. In 1979, Bartels was named as a Fellow of the American College of Sports Medicine.

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Bartels works with an OSU employee in the
Faculty Staff Fitness Program.

Bartels didn’t end his contributions after retirement.  He officially retired from Ohio State on January 1, 1989, upon which the College of Education appointed him as Professor Emeritus, and he continued to teach courses in Physical Education for many years.  Bartels also joined the Ohio State Retirees Association, and he was elected to the position of President in 1991.  The former athlete can be found in two different Hall of Fames on Ohio State’s campus: The Athletic Hall of Fame and the College of Education Hall of Fame, in which he was inducted in 1998 and 2002, respectively.  Bartels also served on the Board of Directors of the Varsity “O” Association.

Finally, faculty and staff who participate in the Your Plan for Health program to stay healthy and active, aren’t the first on campus to be guided toward healthy fitness choices. In 1975, Bartels created the Faculty Staff Fitness Program.  The program offered OSU faculty and staff participants access to a gym, a personalized health and exercise management program, sports trainers, and dietary counseling.  Bartels served as the director of the Faculty Staff Fitness Program from its beginning until 1989.

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Professor Bartels, 2002

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