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New Interview! Calvin & Hobbes creator Bill Watterson and Cul de Sac creator Richard Thompson talk libraries, comics, and the creative process with Ohio State

Dear Friends:

We are delighted to welcome you to two exhibitions of original cartoon art by Bill Watterson and Richard Thompson at the Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum, opening March 22, 2014. The shows will provide a unique opportunity to see—up-close—the original art of these two gifted cartoonists.

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The exhibition will include the very first “Calvin & Hobbes” strip. November 18, 1985. © Bill Watterson – Used by permission of the artist. Bill Watterson Deposit Collection, The Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum

Curator Jenny Robb recently chatted with Bill Watterson about comics and the upcoming exhibit:

Jenny Robb: Why did you choose to place your collection at The Ohio State University’s Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum?

Bill Watterson: Long ago my friend Rich West recommended the library to me. I met Lucy Caswell and was much impressed with her vision and scholarly professionalism. Some years after I stopped the strip, I wanted to get my work into a more protective, permanent environment, so the choice was a no-brainer. And now of course the Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum is even better. It’s a remarkable institution, and the fact that this fabulous resource is right in my home state is icing on the cake.

JR: The library and museum is focused on preserving and providing access to materials documenting the cartooning art form for public viewing and research. How do you feel this arrangement benefits the public? 

BW: The library helps counteract the art world’s condescension to the “low art” of cartoons, and it protects work that would otherwise be scattered or lost. In making original work available for anyone to study, it also gives us access to our own history. You know, if you’re a painter, it’s simply taken for granted that you’ll spend a lot of time in museums studying great paintings, but if you’re a cartoonist, it used to be very hard to see an original cartoon drawing. When you see an original “Steve Canyon” daily strip—they’re gigantic—it’s an entirely different experience than seeing a newspaper or book reproduction.  There is much to appreciate and learn about this wonderful art.

JR: It’s been almost 30 years since Calvin and Hobbes launched, and almost 20 since it ended. How did it feel to revisit the strip for this exhibition? 

BW: Oh, it’s fairly weird. There’s a sort of jet lag when you time-travel to your own past.

JR: When conceiving of a new strip, did the words or images come first? Or, is it a hybrid process?  Is the process fraught or does it flow?

BW: Most often I’d begin with the words. Generally, the writing underwent so many revisions that there was no point in drawing anything until the dialog was fully set.  I could always visualize the pictures anyway.  It was the writing that gave me fits.

JR: As newspaper readership—and, subsequently, production—declines, do you think there will be fewer opportunities for the average person to forge a lasting bond with a character the way that people did with Calvin and Hobbes

BW: That would be my guess. I can’t really picture the average person going to the trouble of curating his own little comic section, much less reading a new and unfamiliar strip for months to build up a relationship with it. There’s so much other content available—instantly and all for free—that there’s no reason to stick around if you’re not immediately enthralled. We consume everything like potato chips now.  In this environment, I suspect the cartoonist’s connection with readers is likely to be superficial and fleeting, unless he taps into some fervent special interest niche. And that audience, almost by definition, will be tiny. It’s a very different world from the days when everyone in America knew who Popeye, Dick Tracy or Charlie Brown was.

JR: How has the digital era and social media freed cartoon artists?

BW: Anyone can publish now, and there are no restrictions of taste, approach, or subject matter. The gatekeepers are gone, so the prospect for new and different voices is exciting. Or at least it will be if anyone reads them. And it will be even more exciting if anyone pays for them. It’s hard to charge admission without a gate.

JR: Richard Thompson’s work will be on display along with yours.  What makes him a standout to you? 

BW: Very few cartoonists do so much, so well. Richard is a wonderful writer and one of the rare ones who can write truly unique, hilarious characters. He’s drawn incisive caricatures, lavish illustrations, and one of the most beautiful comic strips I’ve ever seen. And just when you think it couldn’t be better, sometimes he paints the stuff. Richard has the extra-deluxe, jumbo-size skill set. It’s an inspiring body of work.

Calvin&Hobbes

Illustration from “The Indispensible Calvin and Hobbes”, 1992. © Bill Watterson – Used by permission of the artist. Bill Watterson Deposit Collection, The Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum

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Richard Thompson’s “Cul de Sac”, January 29, 2008 © Richard Thompson, collection of the artist – Used by permission of Richard Thompson

Exhibited along with Bill’s work is the immensely talented creator of Cul de Sac, Richard Thompson. Exhibition Curator Caitlin McGurk got the opportunity to chat with Richard:

Caitlin McGurk: What are your favorite comics currently being published, in the newspaper pages and beyond?

Richard Thompson: Pearls Before Swine, Frazz, and a few others. Currently the comics scene is so atomized, it’s hard to limit favorites to newspaper strips

CM: What is your take on how the digital era and social-media has affected cartoonists, and further more, what are your thoughts on the “death” of print?

RT: It’s sad and confusing.

CM: Tell us about your process with creating Cul de Sac.  Were the characters speaking to you after a while, or were the storylines a struggle?

RT: It was frighteningly easy. The characters came alive and I lost control of them early on. It was like dictation. The plots were so tenuous it didn’t matter what direction they went in. I always thought of it as an organic process. I’d just stand back and let it grow.

CM: How much of Cul de Sac is based on your own memories of childhood, or your experiences with your family?

RT: A lot. Almost none of it is specific enough that you could point to a given situation and easily find its inspiration.

CM: What is the best advice that you could give a young cartoonist?

RT: Run.

Try everything. Comics are, as they say, blowing up. The chance for invention is great but the chance for moneymaking is small. Right now creators are pretty much screwed.

CM: Where did you derive your inspiration for Richard’s Poor Almanac, and were there other reasons to discontinue it beyond a focus on Cul de Sac?

RT: I’ve gotten several dream jobs. Richard’s Poor Almanac was one of them. Each cartoon was sui generis (a curse and a blessing). I ended it when it became clear it was suffering in relation to Cul de Sac. I couldn’t juggle both cartoons.

CM: Who or what were the biggest influences on you as a cartoonist?

RT: Any cartoonist whose name begins with an ‘S': Sorel, Steadman, Steinberg, Sempe…I’m considering changing my name to “Sthompson.” Basically anybody who makes me want to draw. The list is endless.

CM: I understand that you and Bill Watterson have a close friendship. Can you tell us about the history between the two of you, and your thoughts on his work?

RT: I guess you could say that the whole world has a close friendship with Calvin and Hobbes (I know I do).  I’d known Rich West, one of Bill’s closest friends, for years.  Unknown to me, he sent Bill some of my old work and Bill liked it.  God knows I admire his work and comic genius immensely, so getting approbation from him made my head swell noticeably.  It was like receiving an ‘atta boy’ from Jesus Christ.

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Richard Thompson’s “Cul de Sac”, November 4th, 2007 © Richard Thompson, collection of the artist – Used by permission of Richard Thompson

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Join us this summer for Exploring Calvin and Hobbes and The Irresistible Force Meets the Immovable Object: A Richard Thompson RetrospectiveMarch 22 – August 3, 2014 / free / Tuesday-Sunday – 1pm to 5pm / Monday – Closed 

As an added bonus, the Wexner Center for the Arts will be screening the documentary Dear Mr. Watterson at 4pm on Saturday, March 22, followed at 7pm by John Hubley at 100, a viewing of the incredible animation by the creator of Mr. Magoo.

And if you visit campus after May 17, take a short walk over to the Wexner Center for the Arts and check out famed cartoonist Daniel Clowes’ show: May 17 – Aug 3, 2014 / Tuesday-Sunday – visit wexarts.org for hours and admission fees. It is going to be the summer of cartoon art at Ohio State!

 

For reprint and image use permissions, please contact Jane Carroll at carroll.296@osu.edu.

STEPHEN R. BISSETTE: Swamp Thing and the Birth, Life, and Death of the Comics Code Authority

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STEPHEN R. BISSETTE: Swamp Thing and the Birth, Life, and Death
of the 
Comics Code Authority

7pm, Tuesday April 29th, 2014
Wexner Film/Video Theater
FREE FOR ALL AUDIENCES

Veteran comics artist, writer, editor, publisher, and Center for Cartoon Studies instructor Stephen R. Bissette is perhaps best known for his landmark collaboration with writer Alan Moore and artists John Totleben and Rick Veitch on DC Comics’ Saga of the Swamp Thing (1983–87). Many credit that run as a catalyst to the demise of the Comics Code Authority (1954–2011), the mainstream comics industry’s self-regulatory institution formed in response to social, commercial, and Congressional pressure after the spring 1954 publication of Seduction of the Innocent by psychologist Dr. Fredric Wertham. On this 60th anniversary of Wertham’s book and the Comics Code’s initiation, Bissette reflects upon the controversy, launch, and impact of the Code and its eventual dismantling.

For more information visit: http://wexarts.org/film-video/swamp-thing-and-birth-life-and-death-comics-code
Visit the Facebook page for this event here: https://www.facebook.com/events/726968467347491/

Co-sponsored by the Wexner Center for the Arts and The Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum

Additionally, we are thrilled to be making this announcement during the ongoing Will Eisner celebration this March, held annually in association with the Comic Book Legal Defense Fund, the fighters of free speech in comics.

EVENTS – FRANK SANTORO : FROM GRID TO SPREAD

 

The Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum is thrilled to be partnering with the Humanities Institute’s working group Rough Draft to bring in Pittsburgh cartoonist and captain of his own Correspondence Course, Frank Santoro.

This event is FREE and OPEN TO THE PUBLIC.
To ensure the availability of space, if you plan to attend we ask that you please RSVP at cartoonevents@osu.edu

Microsoft Word - Santoro poster.docx

UPCOMING EXHIBIT: CALVIN & HOBBES AND RICHARD THOMPSON

The Ohio State University logo

Contact: Caitlin McGurk
The Ohio State University
Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum
1813 N. High Street
Columbus OH 43210-1343
614-292-0538
cartoons@osu.edu

For Immediate Release: February 7, 2014

Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum Announces Two New Exhibitions:

Exploring Calvin and Hobbes

&

The Irresistible Force Meets the Immovable Object: A Richard Thompson Retrospective

March 22 – August 3, 2014

 

Two new exhibitions of original art by cartoonists Bill Watterson and Richard Thompson will delight fans of Calvin and Hobbes and Cul De Sac. The exhibitions open March 22 at the Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum (BICLM) and will be on display through August 3, 2014.  An opening reception on Friday, March 21 from 6 – 8 p.m. is free and open to the public.  The companion shows provide a unique opportunity to see the original art of these two gifted cartoonists, who are friends and admirers of each other’s work.

Calvin&Hobbes

Exploring Calvin and Hobbes revisits the beloved comic strip created by Watterson from 1985 to 1995. The exhibition will feature original Calvin and Hobbes dailies and Sundays as well as specialty pieces by Watterson from his collection of more than 3,000 originals housed at the BICLM. This is only the second exhibition devoted to Calvin and Hobbes, which appeared in 2,400 newspapers worldwide at the height of its popularity.  Watterson won the National Cartoonists Society’s prestigious Reuben Award for “Outstanding Cartoonist of the Year” in both 1986 and 1988.

Six-year-old Calvin, named after the 16th-century theologian John Calvin, has a vivid imagination; an aversion to homework, chores, and girls; and a penchant for discussing the meaning of life.  Hobbes, named for the 17th-century British philosopher Thomas Hobbes, appears to most of the strips’ characters as a stuffed animal, but from Calvin’s perspective, he is a living, breathing—sometimes even dangerous—tiger.  He’s also a best friend, a playmate, a co-conspirator, and occasionally the voice of reason.  The strip follows the two as they navigate the bumpy ride of life, surrounded by a supporting cast that includes Calvin’s parents, his neighbor Susie, his babysitter Rosalyn, the school bully Moe, and his teacher, Mrs. Wormwood.

The exhibition, curated by BICLM curator Jenny E. Robb, explores Watterson’s mastery of the comic strip art form through engaging characters, thoughtful writing, and creative layouts.  It will also include original art by cartoonists who influenced Watterson, chosen by the artist from the BICLM’s collection, such as Charles Schulz, George Herriman, Jim Borgman, Berkeley Breathed, Garry Trudeau, and Ralph Steadman.

CulDeSac1

The 2011 winner of the Reuben Award for “Outstanding Cartoonist of the Year,” will be featured in the second exhibition, The Irresistible Force Meets the Immovable Object: A Richard Thompson Retrospective. This exhibit, curated by Caitlin McGurk, will not only include gorgeously hand-watercolored Sunday originals and black-and-white dailies from Thompson’s popular comic strip Cul de Sac, but will celebrate his lesser-known abilities as a master of caricature, gags, and editorial cartoons— both as cartoonist and painter.

The six-year run of Cul de Sac serves as an insightful, humorous, and at times sentimental illustration of suburban family life on the outskirts of the city, and therefore a meditation on the tiny and sacred universe we form with our family outside of the rest of the world.  The strip orbits around the activities of sibling child characters Alice and Petey Otterloop.  In an interview with Mike Rhode in 2008, Thompson explained, “Let’s have a comic strip with kids, because comic strips are only this big now, so if you can fit somebody into it, it better be a kid. I thought the kids should be the opposite—a small child who’s the unstoppable force and the brother who’s the immovable object and the way they collide would make some humor.”

This sentiment has grown to have a double meaning, as Thompson had to discontinue the strip in September 2012 due to the advancement of his Parkinson’s disease. Thompson’s work continues to be celebrated in the upcoming release of The Complete Cul de Sac and The Art of Richard Thompson (both to be published by Andrews McMeel), the $100,000 that was raised and donated to the Michael J. Fox Foundation in Richard’s name by the Team Cul de Sac project, and this exhibition, the most extensive display of his work to date.

 

About the Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum:  The BICLM is one of The Ohio State University Libraries’ special collections. Its primary mission is to develop a comprehensive research collection of materials documenting American printed cartoon art (editorial cartoons, comic strips, comic books, graphic novels, sports cartoons, and magazine cartoons) and to provide access to the collections.  The BICLM recently moved into its newly-renovated 30,000 sq. ft. facility that includes a museum with three exhibition galleries, a reading room for researchers and a state-of-the-art collections storage space.   The library reading room is open Monday-Friday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday 1 – 5 p.m. The museum is open Tuesday-Sunday from 1 – 5 p.m.  Seehttp://cartoons.osu.edu/ for further information.

“Dick Tracy” Collection Donated to the Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum

The Ohio State University logo

Contact: Caitlin McGurk
The Ohio State University
Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum
1813 N. High Street
Columbus OH 43210-1343
614-292-0538
cartoons@osu.edu

For Immediate Release: February 4, 2014

“DICK TRACY” COLLECTION DONATED TO THE OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY BILLY IRELAND CARTOON LIBRARY & MUSEUM

Gould photo

The family of the late Dick Tracy cartoonist Chester Gould has donated a substantial collection of original Dick Tracy comic strips and related materials to The Ohio State University Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum (BICLM). Gould wrote and drew Dick Tracy, one of the most popular and successful newspaper comic strips of all time, from 1931 until his retirement in 1977.

Chester Gould’s daughter, Jean Gould O’Connell, along with her son Tracy O’Connell and daughter Sue Sanders, made the decision to gift the Chester Gould Collection to Ohio State. The collection consists of more than 850 original Dick Tracy comic strips along with 64 original Sunday strips. Highlights include the original art for the first 30 days of the strip and Gould’s drawing board on whichDick Tracy was created, written and drawn for 46 years.

“As I got older, the time had come for me to make a decision about where to place my father’s work,” said Jean Gould O’Connell. “After traveling to Ohio State, my family and I were extremely impressed with the Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum. I know my father would have been very proud to have his work in such a prestigious place.”

Added Tracy O’Connell, “The material left our family with emotion, but with the knowledge my grandfather’s work will be accessible to the public as he originally intended.” The Chester Gould Collection will be housed in BICLM’s secure, climate-controlled storage space, which is part of the new library and museum facility. The materials will be catalogued and made available to researchers in the coming months.

“We are truly honored that Mrs. O’Connell has entrusted the Gould family’s collection to us,” said BICLM’s Curator and Associate Professor Jenny E. Robb. “These works of art and unique historical materials will delight researchers, fans, and visitors, and will be preserved for future generations to enjoy.”

Ohio State Vice Provost and Director of Libraries Carol Pitts Diedrichs said the enormously popular strip is a welcome addition to the BICLM collection. “It is wonderful that such a noteworthy donation as this is being added to the largest collection of cartoon art and comics material in the world,” said Diedrichs. “As one of the treasures of the BICLM, the Gould Collection can be viewed and studied by students and scholars from around the world.”

The Comic Art Price Guide author Jerry Weist wrote about the significance of the Dick Tracy comic strip, saying, “Anchored by some of the strongest inking in the history of comic strip art, Gould created a timeless black and white world of good versus evil that still captivates the art-lover’s eye today – and his story pacing is impeccable, with some of the most suspenseful and gruesome sequences of any comic strip.”

“To think that my grandfather’s creation, Dick Tracy, will be enjoyed and shared by generations to come is most exciting,” said Sue Sanders. “It gives us comfort in knowing his work will be respected, treasured and beautifully cared for at the museum.”

The collection is currently being catalogued and will be on display in the near future. Visit our website at http://cartoons.osu.edu for updates.

Chester Gould's drawing table and tabaret, on display at the entrance to our Treasures Gallery.

Chester Gould’s drawing table and tabaret, on display at the entrance to our Treasures Gallery.

 About the Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum: The BICLM is one of The Ohio State University Libraries’ special collections. Its primary mission is to develop a comprehensive research collection of materials documenting American printed cartoon art (editorial cartoons, comic strips, comic books, graphic novels, sports cartoons, and magazine cartoons) and to provide access to these collections. The BICLM recently moved into its newly-renovated 30,000 sq. ft. facility that includes a museum with three exhibition galleries, a reading room for researchers, and a state-of-the-art collections storage space. The library reading room is open Monday-Friday from 9 am to 5 pm and Sunday from 1-5 pm. See  http://cartoons.osu.edu for further information.

About The Ohio State University: The Ohio State University is a dynamic community of diverse resources, where opportunity thrives and where individuals transform themselves and the world. Founded in 1870, Ohio State is a world-class public research university and the leading comprehensive teaching and research institution in the state of Ohio. With more than 63,000 students (including 57, 000 in Columbus), the Wexner Medical Center, 14 colleges, 80 centers and 175 majors, the university offers its students tremendous breadth and depth of opportunity in the liberal arts, the sciences and the professions.

A Prophetic Vision of the 20th Century by J. Campbell Cory, 1901

Happy New Year, everybody! 2013 proved to be one of the biggest years in history for the Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum, and we can’t thank you enough for your patience during our move this summer, and your undying support in celebrating our incredible new home with us this Fall! We know that 2014 only holds even bigger and better opportunities for us, and we’re excited to share them all with you in the coming months.

Below, an original tearsheet (which is currently on exhibit in our Treasures gallery) from January 6, 1901 by J. Campbell Cory for the New York World. Unfortunately by 2014 we still haven’t mastered teleportation, let alone by 1987 as he predicts…

Click to enlarge:

20thCenturyPredictions

J. Campbell Cory tearsheet for the New York World. From the San Francisco Academy of Comic Art Collection, The Ohio State University Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum

See you all in 2014!

Happy Holidays from Arnold Roth and the Cartoon Library!

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Arnold Roth, Original art from National Lampoon. Arnold Roth Deposit Collection, The Ohio State University Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum

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Arnold Roth, Original art from National Lampoon. Arnold Roth Deposit Collection, The Ohio State University Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum

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Arnold Roth, Original art from National Lampoon. Arnold Roth Deposit Collection, The Ohio State University Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum

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Arnold Roth, Original art from National Lampoon. Arnold Roth Deposit Collection, The Ohio State University Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum

 

Comics Classes at OSU!

In the wake of the incredible 2013 Grand Opening Festival of Cartoon Art, we’ve had nothing but endless good things coming our way, with lots of exciting news to announce soon!

First, a huge thank you again to everyone who attended the Festival- we only look forward to continuing to serve and expand the comics community with engaging programming and powerful exhibits. An additional thanks goes out to our friends at the The Wexner Center for the Arts and Jared Gardner for making this all possible, to all of our generous donors!

If you haven’t checked them out yet, you can see images from the Festival on our Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum Facebook Page.

We’re also happy to announce TWO fabulous new OSU courses on comics that will be taught in the Will Eisner Seminar Room at the new Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum in the new year! If you’re an OSU student and happen to be reading this, there is still a small number of spaces available in these classes so be sure to sign up soon! More info below:

difficulthistories

English 2275: Pictures That Tick – Difficult History in Comics
Ben Owen
Spring 2014

Over the last three decades, a number of comics creators have used the lowly status of the comic book to their own advantage. By drawing true-life events in a medium that has no standing or credibility to claim the truth, they have been able to pose profound and urgent questions about how memory and history operate. Turning the gleeful taboo-trouncing of the underground comix movement to autobiographical and historical subjects, these artists have rendered shockingly visible bodies, acts, and histories that have otherwise remained hidden and untellable. The best artists working in comics right now tackle our skepticism towards comics—and towards drawn images generally—head on, posing a set of fascinating and bizarre questions, such as:

  • How do you tell a story from Auschwitz using funny animals?
  • Why draw war journalism when the war will be over long before you’ve finished drawing?
  • What color is your father’s death?

In this class we will seek to understand the varied and formally inventive answers artists have provided to those questions, and more importantly how those answers make us rethink not only artistic form, but also the ways in which we come to know history. New histories demand new forms for telling history, and the works we will look at in this class demonstrate a wide range of experiments in telling.

We will look at prominent works of comics autobiography, journalism, and history by creators such as Spiegelman, Alison Bechdel, Marjane Satrapi, Joe Sacco, Alan Moore, Lynda Barry and Neil Gaiman as well as lesser-known but influential work by Carol Tyler, Justin Green, and Phoebe Gloeckner. Our class discussions will touch on child abuse, survivor’s guilt, queer archives, the breakup of Yugoslavia, Jack the Ripper, September 11, the Iranian revolution, and scary puppets. Looking at these topics will necessarily lead to discussions of memory, justice, morality, the philosophy of history, and the ethics of aesthetic representation.

Comics&Time

English 5194: Comics & Time
Jared Gardner
Spring 2014

Time, history and memory is the dominant obsession of graphic narrative. For more than a century–and even before Einstein articulated his challenge to Newtonian time–comics have been exploring alternate models of time and multiple models for imagining it, navigating it, and  narrating it. This course will focus on late 20th- and early 21st- century graphic narratives that explore time as a central problem. This seminar is open to graduate and upper-level graduate students.

 

…Well, I know what classes I’ll be auditing this Spring!

Happy Halloween!

…from the Cartoon Library, Terry, and Nancy!
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Grand Opening Festival Update!

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Cartoon Library friends and fans, we’re coming up for a breath of air during the final stretch of planning for our Grand Opening Festival of Cartoon Art to let you know that the rumors are true: Festival registration has sold out and is now closed.

But fear not! There are still MANY ways to celebrate with us that weekend, and tickets are available to individual events:

  • The Academic Conference on Thursday and Friday are free and open to the public, up to and including the Henry Jenkins keynote speech! We’re thrilled to have renowned comics scholars from all over the world joining us for two days of panels and papers focusing on the strengths and special features of the Cartoon Library’s unparalleled collection. The Thursday and Friday conference schedule can be seen here.
  • Tickets for our kickoff program In Conversation: Paul Pope and Jeff Smith are ON SALE NOW through the Wexner Center for the Arts! Join us for a conversation between internationally acclaimed cartoonists and Ohio State University alumni Jeff Smith (Bone, RASL) and Paul Pope (THB, Heavy Liquid, Batman Year 100) as they discuss their extraordinary careers and reflect on the importance of comics history. $5 general public, Free for Ohio State students with BUCK ID
  • Tickets for our keynote event An Evening with the Hernandez Bros are ON SALE NOW through the Wexner Center for the Arts! Join us on Saturday, November 16th for a conversation between alternative comics legends Gilbert and Jaime Hernandez as they discuss their groundbreaking series Love & Rockets and their ongoing stories about Latino and Latina life, love, and punk rock on both sides of the border. $5 general public, Free for Ohio State students with BUCK ID
  • On November 1st, a very limited number of tickets will go on sale through the Wexner Center for the Arts for the individual Saturday and Sunday events including talks by Matt Bors, Eddie Campbell, Stephan Pastis, Brian Basset, and Kazu Kibuishi. Individual tickets will also go on sale that day for the Stripped screening and panel with Patrick McDonnell, Hilary Price, and Dylan Meconis, and the Looney Tunes Afternoon with Jeff Smith. Tickets for each event will be $5
    *When we say limited, we mean limited, so be sure to check the Wexner Center for the Arts ticket office early that day! https://wexarts.org/tickets
  • On Wednesday, November 15th the Wexner Center for the Arts will be screening The Art of Spiegelman (Clara Kuperberg & Joelle Oosterlinck, 2010) preceded by Every Tuesday: A Portrait of The New Yorker Cartoonists (Rachel Loube, 2012) as part of the 2013 Columbus Jewish Film Festival. Tickets are on sale now through the Columbus JCC.
    For more information: http://wexarts.org/film-video/art-spiegelman
  • The Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum Galleries will be officially open to the public for the very first time on Saturday, November 16th and Sunday, November 17th from 10am-5pm. On view will be our debut exhibit Substance and Shadow: The Art of the Cartoon curated by Brian Walker, and Treasures from the Collections of the Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum. For more information on the exhibits visit: http://cartoons.osu.edu/FCA/2013/exhibits
  • Limited space is still available for our Sunday Youth Programming events:
    -Ariol: Just a Donkey Youth ages 8-10 are invited to spend the morning with French cartoonist Marc Boutavant for a cartooning workshop based on his award-winning series Ariol.
    To register contact Caitlin McGurk at mcgurk.17@osu.edu – 614-292-1134
    -Teen Wex Lab: Comics Drawing Jam A comics drawing workshop for teens organized by the Wexner Center for the Arts, as well as a chat with Kazu Kibuishi!
    To register contact Jean Pitman at jpitman@wexarts.org

We’ve been so amazed and grateful for the incredible response we’ve received about the Festival this year, and can’t wait to party with you all in less than one month! Stay tuned for more updates.

*Festival artwork by Paul Hornschemeier

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