Month: August 2012 (page 1 of 2)

Found in the Collection: Fleischmann’s Yeast Comic Advertisements

Well, kids, school is officially back in session here at The Ohio State University! Now, although we know you’re enthralled with the excitement of coursework, cafeteria food, cramped dorm-rooms and orientation ice-breakers, give yourself a break! At some point in your college career, you may also want to consider: dating.

What’s that you say? Bad skin leftover from high school getting you down? We know that microeconomics textbook looks big enough to hide behind forever, but it’s time you stepped out to face the music that’s blasting from fraternity row. Luckily, there is hope and help in Fleischmann’s Yeast. As you will see below, many young bucks your age have faced the same plight of pimples, and after choking down a few cakes of yeast they walked away clear skinned and confident. Just see the comic strip ads for Fleischmann’s Yeast, the cure-all for adolescent acne, self-doubt and Saturday nights.

1930s Fleischmann’s Yeast comic strip advertisement. From the San Francisco Academy of Comic Art Collection, The Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum (click to enlarge)

1930s Fleischmann’s Yeast comic strip advertisement. From the San Francisco Academy of Comic Art Collection, The Ohio State University Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum (click to enlarge)

1930s Fleischmann’s Yeast comic strip advertisement. From the San Francisco Academy of Cartoon Art Collection, The Ohio State University Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum. (click to enlarge)

1930s Fleischmann’s Yeast comic strip advertisement. From the San Francisco Academy of Comic Art Collection, The Ohio State University  Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum. (click to enlarge)

We’ve got a soft-spot for comic advertisements over here, as you could probably tell from last months post on Noel Sickles and Milton Caniff’s Mr. Coffee Nerves. However, unlike the men behind Paul Arthur, we have not identified the artist or artists behind Fleischmann’s Yeast comic strips. As always, guesses are welcome!

Happy Birthday, Jack Kirby! Found in the Collection: Captain America # 206

Happy 95th Birthday to Jack Kirby, the true King of Comics! Below, a signed original page from Kirby’s 1977 Captain America No. 206, one of the beloved few Kirby originals in our collection at the Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum.

Original Jack Kirby page from “Captain America # 206″. From the International Museum of Cartoon Art Collection, The Ohio State University Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum (click to enlarge)

PRESS RELEASE: The National Cartoonist Society Foundation Answers Schulz Challenge (click to enlarge)

Upcoming Cartoon Library Event! Nick Anderson on Humor and Opinion: The Art of the Political Cartoon

This event is open to the public. Non-OSU affiliates can register by calling 1-800-762-5646.

This event has been made possible in collaboration with the Ohio State University Alumni Association, The Humanities Institute, and the John Glenn School of Public Affairs. Sponsored in part by the Mark J. Cohen and Rosie Marie McDaniel Endowment, and Liberty Mutual Insurance.

Happy First Day of Classes, OSU!

Happy First Day of Classes, OSU!

From all of us at the Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum, with the help of Paul Reinman and Merrie Chase.

Paul Reinman original for “Merrie Chase”. From the International Museum of Cartoon Art Collection, The Ohio State University Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum (click to enlarge)

Found in the Collection: “Maybe I Just Have Big Bones?”

As proven by the overwhelming response from our readers on Bill Blackbeard’s cartoon textile, the power of crowd-sourcing on the comics blogosphere is something we are more than happy to harness. Falling wonderfully in line with our old favorite The Short Circus (which was identified by one of the creators himself), the solitary page below had us both intrigued and in stitches when we stumbled across it in the International Museum of Cartoon Art Collection.

Page 2 of the story ”Maybe I Just Have Big Bones” from ”Plop!” Vol. 4 # 22, July/August, 1976. From the International Museum of Cartoon Art Collection, The Ohio State University Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum (click to enlarge)

This spectacularly grotesque page from issue number 22 of DC Comics’ Plop! volume 4 is the second of a two-page story entitled Maybe I Just Have Big Bones?, and unfortunately nearly the only piece in the issue that is unsigned. Plop!, which ran in the mid 1970s for 24 issues and featured horror and humor similar to that seen in MAD Magazine, was especially known for its Basil Wolverton and Wally Wood covers on the first 19 issues.

Edited by Joe Orlando, Plop! No. 22 contained work from Sergio Aragones, Dave Manak, John Albano, Don Edwing, and many more. The Grand Comics Database guesses Bill Draut as the artist for our mystery page, which may be correct.

If any of our readers can confirm this or take a guess, feel free to write in, or just enjoy the page!

Found in the Collection: Wes Herschensohn (1928-1985)

Best known for his animation work for the heaviest of hitters–Walt Disney Studios, Hanna Barbera and Filmation–Wes Herschensohn lived an incredibly accomplished life in his short 57 years. Having collaborated with Pablo Picasso on an animated short, he also conceived, animated, and co-produced “The Picasso Summer” starring Albert Finney and Yvette Mimieux for Warner Brothers, based on a Ray Bradbury story in 1969.

A year before first meeting Picasso at a dinner in Cannes in 1964, Herschensohn produced the following sequential futuristic water-colored illustrations. Each has rhyming captions penciled on the back, which we have included in the image caption. Whether they were used or intended for an animation is unknown to us.

“…Though frightful things may leer and nod, where never man before has trod…” Wes Herschensohn original “I”. From the International Museum of Cartoon Art collection, The Ohio State University Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum (click to enlarge)

…”The air seemed filled with wondrous ships, returning from undreamed of trips…” Wes Herschensohn original “II”. From the International Museum of Cartoon Art collection, The Ohio State University Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum (click to enlarge)

…”Man could leap himself into the air, and fly or journey anywhere, without a second thought or care”… Wes Herschensohn original “III”. From the International Museum of Cartoon Art collection, The Ohio State University Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum (click to enlarge)

…”Saw sight after wondrous sight, and watched from some astounding height, a population all in flight!”… Wes Herschensohn original “IV”. From the International Museum of Cartoon Art collection, The Ohio State University Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum (click to enlarge)

Found in the Collection: Rube Goldberg’s Sculptures

Amid the original art, rare newspaper clippings and books galore- the Cartoon Library also preserves all kinds of treasures that are not necessarily comic art, but related to the history of the cartoonist or collector. As we saw in the Eldon Dedini holdings that included grade school report cards and the like, these objects help to flesh out the complete story of a life.

Rube Goldberg, one of the few cartoonists whose name became a household expression, was not only a master of the pen but an incredibly talented sculptor as well. Goldberg spent much of the last ten years of his life working at sculpture, and we are happy to have a good number of them here in our collection here at the Cartoon Library.

Below, a sampling of Rube Goldberg’s sculptures, starting with his rendering of American politician Everett Dirksen:

Rube Goldberg sculpture of Everett Dirksen. From the International Museum of Cartoon Art Collection, The Ohio State University Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum (click to enlarge)

Goldberg’s bust of Harry Hershfield, his cartoonist contemporary and friend.

Rube Goldberg’s sculpture of Harry Hershfield. From the International Museum of Cartoon Art Collection, The Ohio State University Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum (click to enlarge)

The following three: “Woman with Earrings”, “Fighter” and “Elderly Man”

Rube Goldberg’s sculpture of “Woman with Earrings” From the International Museum of Cartoon Art Collection, The Ohio State University Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum

Rube Goldberg’s sculpture “Fighter“. From the International Museum of Cartoon Art Collection, The Ohio State University Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum (click to enlarge)

Rube Goldberg’s sculpture “Elderly Man” From the International Museum of Cartoon Art Collection, The Ohio State University Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum

Rube Goldberg also captured his sense of humor through a lot of his sculptures, like the one below, cleverly titled “Snake’s Day Off

Rube Goldberg’s sculpture “Snake’s Day Off” From the International Museum of Cartoon Art Collection, The Ohio State University Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum (click to enlarge)

Detail of Rube Goldberg’s sculpture “Snake’s Day Off” From the International Museum of Cartoon Art Collection, The Ohio State University Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum

The Rube Goldberg sculptures are among many others included in various collections here at the Cartoon Library, and we take pride in our ability to archivally house them.  In case any readers out there are curious about how we store them, take a look below! All sculptures are wrapped in archival corrosion-interception bags, tied snug with ribbon instead of tape, with their finding numbers easily located on a string tag.

Found in the Collection: Famous American Cartoonists

Meet your favorite Famous American Cartoonists, on the cover of The New York Herald colored section!

Color section cover of The New York Herald, August 26th 1900. From the San Francisco Academy of Comic Art Collection, The Ohio State University Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum. (click to enlarge)

Ah, the distinguished men of the funny pages in 1900. Who do you like best?

We think Carl Schultze is rather dashing. However, it was Dan Smith who regularly produced some of the most breathtaking covers for the Herald, which we’ll be featuring in the coming weeks. The Herald’s 8-page “colored section” featured not only comics, but overflowed with painted photographs, jokes, poems, commentary on fashion and society, and more. We have many of these complete colored sections in our San Francisco Academy of Cartoon Art Collection.

Found in the Collection: Bill Blackbeard’s Cartoon Textile

Hey, all of you cartoon aficionados! Help us identify the characters in this incredible embroidered textile

When we received the Bill Blackbeard collection, among it was this textile of over 100 embroidered cartoon characters. Unfortunately, we do not know who produced such a marvel, but we’re working hard to at least identify each character they lovingly stitched into the fabric.

Do you recognize any of the characters? We have digitally numbered the textile, and you can enlarge the image by clicking on it (we recommend using your browser to zoom even further). Below it you will find our best guesses as well as a number of blanks that we would love your help on.

Please leave us a comment with your expert findings!

Cartoon Textile from The San Francisco Academy of Comic Art Collection, The Ohio State University Cartoon Library & Museum

—-UPDATE—-

Wow! Thanks so much, everyone! Incredible detective work- we’re all in awe and ever-so-grateful over here at the Cartoon Library. Thank you for your patience as we fact-checked and updated our list. There are still some more to go! Unfortunately, our blog software does not allow us to upload very large files. Instead, I have provided details below of the unidentified characters. We hope you’ll keep contributing!

Cartoon Textile [detail] from The San Francisco Academy of Comic Art Collection, The Ohio State University Cartoon Library & Museum

Cartoon Textile [detail] from The San Francisco Academy of Comic Art Collection, The Ohio State University Cartoon Library & Museum

1. Buck Rogers

2. Joe Stork (Krazy Kat) (Thanks to reader Steven Stwalley!)

3. Napoleon

4. Uncle Elby

5. Checkered Demon

6. Marsupilami (Thanks to reader Eric Newsom!)

7. Bug Rogers (Gordo)

8. Churchy LaFemme

9.

10. Pogo

11. Albert Alligator

12. Dick Tracy

13. Offisa Pup

14. Krazy Kat

15. Ignatz Mouse

16. Mock Duck (Krazy Kat) (Thanks to reader Paul!)

17. Rudy

18.

19. Hawkshaw the Detective

20. Major Hoople

21.

22. Farside

23. Giff Wiff (Katzenjammer Kids) (Thanks to reader Jean-Paul Jennequin)

24. Eugene the Jeep

25. Farside (Thanks to reader Eric Newsom!)

26. Sheena

27. Little Orphan Annie & Sandy

28. Sparkplug

29. Sunshine

30. Barney Google

31. Old Doc Yak (Thanks to reader Steven Stwalley!)

32. Mamie (Moon Mullins) (Thanks to reader Steven Stwalley!)

33. Baron Bean (Thanks to reader Steven Stwalley!)

34.

35. Emmy (Moon Mullins)

36. Uncle Willie ? (Moon Mullins)

37. Mr. Beans (Robert Dickey) (Thanks to reader Steven Stwalley!) & Tippie (Edwina Dumm) (Thanks to Tom Spurgeon!)

38. Farside (Thanks to reader Eric Newsom!)

39. Dirty Dalton (Thanks to reader Paul!)

40. Texas Slim (Thanks to reader Paul!)

41. Wimpy

42. Maggie & Jiggs (Bringing Up Father)

43. Maud

44. Happy Hooligan

45. George Booth dog

46. Felix the Cat

47. Salesman Sam (Thanks to reader Roger Langridge!)

48. Scrooge McDuck

49. character from Casey the Cop (by Charles Rodrigues) (Thanks to reader Frank Pauer!)

50. Buster Brown & Mary Jane

51.

52. Boob McNutt (Thanks to reader Steven Stwalley!)

53. Mutt & Jeff

54. Tige and Midnight (Buster Brown)

55. Shmoo

56. Little Joe (by Ed Leffingwell) (Thanks to reader Steven Stwalley!)

57. Bunky (Thanks to reader Steven Stwalley!)

58. Jerry on the Job (Thanks to reader Chris Mautner!)

59. Casey the Cop (by Charles Rodrigues) (Thanks to reader Louis Wysocki!)

60. Kitty (Polly & Her Pals)

61. Polly Perkins

62. Maw (Suzie Perkins)

63. Neewah (Thanks to reader Steven Stwalley!)

64. Paw (Sam’l Perkins)

65. Ashur Earl Perkins (Thanks to reader Steven Stwalley!)

66.

67. Tater (Snuffy Smith)?

68. Abbie the Agent

69.

70. Captain Easy

71. Wash Tubbs

72. Foozy (Alley Oop)?

73.

74. character from “Casey the Cop” (by Charles Rodrigues) (Thanks to reader Frank Pauer!)

75. Skeezix (Gasoline Alley) (Thanks to reader Steven Stwalley!)

76. Bennie the Swink (Wash’s pet in Captain Easy) (Thanks to reader Todd Hillmer!)

77.

78. Little Jimmy

79. Broom Hilda

80. Alley Oop

81. Bécassine, mother, and Uncle Corentin (From L’enfance de Bécassine) (Thanks to reader Jean-Paul Jennequin!)

82. General Halftrack (Beetle Bailey)

83. Der Captain (Thanks to reader Steven Stwalley)

84. Tehuana Mama (Gordo)

85. From Bécassine, unknown character (Thanks to reader Jean-Paul Jennequin!)

86. Oola (Alley Oop) (Thanks to reader Roger Langridge!)

87. The General (Little Joe) (Thanks to reader Richard Olson!)

88. Getafix (Thanks to reader Andres Denkberg!)

89. Obelix (Thanks to reader Mike Lynch!)

90.

91. Dolly Dimples (by Grace Drayton) (Thanks to reader Holmes from Barnacle Press!)

92.

93. The Sea Hag (Popeye) (Thanks to reader Brian Hagen!)

94. Alice The Goon (Popeye) (Thanks to reader Mike Lynch!)

95. Sappo (Popeye) (Thanks to reader Roger Langridge!)

96. Der Professor (Katzenjammer Kids) (Thanks to reader Mike Lynch!)

97. Popeye

98. Swee’Pea sitting in the mouth of Toar (Popeye)  (Thanks to reader Paul!)

99. Fritz (Katzenjammer Kids)

100. Mama (Katzenjammer Kids)

101. Hans (Katzenjammer Kids)

102. Little Nemo in Slumberland (The Imp, ?, Flip, The Princess, Little Nemo)

103. Snoopy

104. Oat Willie (Gilbert Shelton) (Thanks to reader Steven Stwalley!)

105. Woodstock

106. Fat Freddy’s Cat

107. Yellow Kid

108.

109. Mickey Mouse and Minnie Mouse

110. Mr. Jack (Swinnerton)

111. Physically Powerful Katrina (Toonerville)

112. Mickey “Himself” McGuire (Thanks to reader Mike Lynch!)

113. Snake (B.C.) (Thanks to reader Brian Bonelli!)

114. Fat Broad?

115. Count Screwloose (Thanks to reader Steven Stwalley!)

116. Senor Dog (Gordo)

117. Ponce De Leon (Gordo)

118. Poosy Gato (Gordo)

119. Uncle Bim (The Gumps) (Thanks to reader Jared Gardner!)

120. -Not numbered in image- anteater from B.C. (Thanks to reader Steven Stwalley)

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